German submarine U-13 (1935)

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For other ships of the same name, see German submarine U-13.
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: U-13
Ordered: 2 February 1935
Builder: Deutsche Werke, Kiel
Yard number: 248
Laid down: 20 June 1935
Launched: 9 November 1935
Commissioned: 30 November 1935
Fate: Sunk 31 May 1940, in the North Sea. 26 survivors
General characteristics
Type: IIB
Displacement: 279 Tons surfaced
329 Tons submerged
Length: 42.7 m (140 ft)
Beam: 4.1 m (13 ft)
Speed: 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) surfaced
7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) submerged
Endurance: Surfaced 1,800 Miles at 12 Knots
Submerged 43 Miles at 4 Knots
Crew: 25
Armament: 3 Fore Torpedo tubes with 6 21 inch Torpedos and 1 2 cm AA gun on fore-deck
Service record
Part of: Kriegsmarine:
1st U-boat Flotilla
Identification codes: M 15 421
Commanders: Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen
Karl Daublebsky von Eichhain
Heinz Scheringer
Wolfgang Lüth
Max-Martin Schulte
Operations: Nine
Victories: Nine ships sunk for a total of 28,056 GRT
Two ships damaged for a total of 14,316 GRT

German submarine U-13 was a Type IIB U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine which was commissioned on 30 November 1936, following construction at the Deutsche Werke shipyards at Kiel. The first commander on board was Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen. In its career it completed nine patrols, all while serving with the 1st U-boat Flotilla. It succeeded in sinking nine ships and damaging two more.

Fate[edit]

U-13 was sunk on 31 May 1940, in the North Sea 11 miles south-east of Lowestoft, in position 52°26′N 02°02′E / 52.433°N 2.033°E / 52.433; 2.033Coordinates: 52°26′N 02°02′E / 52.433°N 2.033°E / 52.433; 2.033 by depth charges from the British sloop HMS Weston. There were no casualties.

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage
(GRT)
Fate[1]
10 September 1939 Magdapur  United Kingdom 8,641 Sunk (mine)
16 September 1939 City of Paris  United Kingdom 10,902 damaged (mine)
24 September 1939 Phyrné  France 2,660 Sunk (mine)
30 September 1939 Cairnmona  United Kingdom 4,666 Sunk
19 November 1939 Bowling  United Kingdom 793 Sunk
6 January 1940 City of Marseilles  United Kingdom 8,317 Damaged (mine)
31 January 1940 Start  Norway 1,168 Sunk
1 February 1940 Fram  Sweden 2,491 Sunk
6 February 1940 Anu  Estonia 1,421 Sunk (mine)
17 April 1940 Swainby  United Kingdom 4,935 Sunk
26 April 1940 Lily  Denmark 1,281 Sunk
28 April 1940 Scottish American  United Kingdom 6,999 Damaged

References[edit]

Notes
Bibliography
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). "Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945". Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German) IV (Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler). ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 

External links[edit]

See also[edit]