German submarine U-400

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Career
Name: U-400
Ordered: 25 August 1941
Builder: Howaldtswerke, Kiel
Yard number: 32
Laid down: 18 November 1942
Launched: 8 January 1944
Commissioned: 18 March 1944
Fate: Sunk, 15 December 1944
General characteristics
Type: Type VIIC submarine
Displacement: 769 tonnes (757 long tons) surfaced
871 t (857 long tons) submerged
Length: 67.1 m (220 ft 2 in) o/a
50.5 m (165 ft 8 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.2 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
4.7 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Draft: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Propulsion: 2 × supercharged Germaniawerft 6-cylinder 4-stroke F46 diesel engines, totalling 2,800–3,200 bhp (2,100–2,400 kW). Max rpm: 470-490
2 × GL RP 137/c electric motors, totalling 750 shp (560 kW) and max rpm: 296.
Speed: 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) surfaced
7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged
Range: 15,170 km (8,190 nmi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
150 km (81 nmi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Crush depth: 250–295 m (820–968 ft)
Complement: 44–52 officers and ratings
Armament: 5 × 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four bow, one stern)
14 × G7e torpedoes or 26 TMA mines
1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) deck gun (220 rounds)
Various AA guns
Service record[1][2]
Part of: 5th U-boat Flotilla
(18 March–31 October 1944)
11th U-boat Flotilla
(1 November–15 December 1944)
Commanders: Kptlt. Horst Creutz
(18 March–15 December 1944)
Operations: a. 15–16 November 1944
b. 18 November–15 December 1944
Victories: None

German submarine U-400 was a Type VIIC U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

The submarine was laid down on 18 November 1942 at the Howaldtswerke yard in Kiel as 'werk' 32, launched on 8 January 1944 and commissioned on 18 March under the command of Kapitänleutnant Horst Creutz.[1]

Service history[edit]

After training with the 5th U-boat Flotilla, U-400 was attached to the 11th U-boat Flotilla for front-line service on 1 November 1944.[1]

The U-boat sailed from Horten in Norway for her first war patrol on 15 November 1944, and headed for the waters off Land's End.[2] Despite repeated requests for reports by the German U-boat Command, none were received. The U-boat was eventually listed as "missing" at the end of January 1945. After the war, the Allies attributed the loss of U-400 to a depth charge attack by the frigate HMS Nyasaland on 17 December 1944, about 30 nautical miles (56 km) SE of Kinsale, Ireland.[3]

Discovery[edit]

The wreck of U-400 was finally identified by nautical archaeologist Innes McCartney and historian Axel Niestle in 2006, about 10 miles (16 km) north-west of Padstow, Cornwall, at position 50°39.9′N 5°5′W / 50.6650°N 5.083°W / 50.6650; -5.083Coordinates: 50°39.9′N 5°5′W / 50.6650°N 5.083°W / 50.6650; -5.083[1] close to the wrecks of two other U-boats, U-325 and U-1021. All three submarines were sunk in the Bristol Channel by a deep-trap minefield.[1]

The U-boat sunk by Nyasaland is now believed to have been U-772.[4]

Previously recorded fate[edit]

U-400 was noted as sunk in mid-December 1944 in the British minefield 'HX A1' off the Cornish coast.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e "The Type VIIC boat U-400 - German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net". uboat.net. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "War Patrols by German U-boat U-400 - Boats - uboat.net". uboat.net. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "The loss of U-325, U-400 and U-1021". www.uboat.net. Retrieved 2010-01-13. 
  4. ^ "War Mystery Solved". www.cix.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-01-13. 
Bibliography

External links[edit]

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