German submarine U-778

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: U-778
Ordered: 20 January 1941
Builder: Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven
Yard number: 161
Laid down: 3 July 1943
Launched: 6 May 1944
Commissioned: 7 July 1944
Out of service: 8 May 1945
Fate: Sank while under tow 4 December 1945.
General characteristics
Type: Type VIIC submarine
Displacement: 769 tonnes (757 long tons) surfaced
871 t (857 long tons) submerged
Length: 67.1 m (220 ft 2 in) o/a
50.5 m (165 ft 8 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.2 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
4.7 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Draft: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Propulsion: 2 × supercharged Germaniawerft 6-cylinder 4-stroke F46 diesel engines, totalling 2,800–3,200 bhp (2,100–2,400 kW). Max rpm: 470-490
2 × GL RP 137/c electric motors, totalling 750 shp (560 kW) and max rpm: 296
Speed: 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) surfaced
7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged
Range: 8,500 nmi (15,700 km) at 10 kn (19 km/h) surfaced
80 nmi (150 km) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Crush depth: 250–295 m (820–968 ft)
Complement: 44–52 officers & ratings
Armament:
Service record
Part of: Kriegsmarine:
11th U-boat flotilla
Commanders: Oblt.z.S. Ralf Jürs
Operations: 1 patrol - 4 March 1945 to 26 March 1945
Victories: None

German submarine U-778 was a Type VIIC U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine in World War II. She only completed one combat patrol and sank no Allied ships. She was surrendered to the Allies at Bergen on the 8 May 1945.[1]

On 4 December 1945, she was being towed offshore, to be scuttled as part of Operation Deadlight, but foundered and sank before reaching the scuttling ground, at a point 55°32′N 7°7′W / 55.533°N 7.117°W / 55.533; -7.117, 16 nautical miles (30 km; 18 mi) North East of Malin Head[1] in around 70 metres (230 ft) of water. The wreck was rediscovered by marine archaeologist Innes McCartney in 2001.[2]

In 2007, Derry City Council announced plans to raise the boat to be the main exhibit of a new maritime museum.[3] Many of the other Operation Deadlight U-boats were used for target practice and sunk by gunfire, torpedoes, rockets or bombs. U-778, by contrast, is remarkably intact and lies in relatively shallow water.

On 3 October 2007, an Irish diver, Michael Hanrahan, died whilst filming the wreck as part of the salvage project.[4] In November 2009, a spokesman from the council's heritage museum service announced the salvage project had been cancelled for cost reasons.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b "U-778". uboat.net. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  2. ^ "U778 image from expedition gallery". 
  3. ^ Bowcott, Owen (2007-08-20). "Raise the U-boat: council plans to put Nazi sub in maritime museum". The Guardian. 
  4. ^ "Team to recover U-boat diver body". BBC. 2007-10-03. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  5. ^ "Costs sink plan to raise U-boat". BBC. 2009-11-12. Retrieved 2009-11-25. 
Bibliography
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). "Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945". Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German) IV (Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler). ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 55°32′N 7°7′W / 55.533°N 7.117°W / 55.533; -7.117