German torpedo boat T-36

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Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: T-36
Ordered: 23 April 1938
Builder: Schichau, Elbing
Laid down: 1942
Launched: 5 February 1944
Commissioned: 9 December 1944
Fate: Sunk, 5 May 1945
General characteristics [1]
Class & type: Type 1939 torpedo boat
Displacement: 1,294 long tons (1,315 t) (standard)
Length: 97 m (318 ft 3 in) o/a
Beam: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
Draft: 3.22 m (10 ft 7 in)
Installed power: 29,000 shp (22,000 kW)
Propulsion: 2 × shafts
2 × Wagner geared steam turbine sets
4 × Wagner water-tube boilers
Speed: 32.5 knots (60.2 km/h; 37.4 mph)
Complement: 206
Armament: 4 × 1 - 105 mm (4.1 in) guns
2 × 2 - 37 mm (1.5 in) anti-aircraft (AA) guns
7 × 1 - 20 mm (0.8 in) AA guns
2 × 3 - 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes
Service record

German torpedo-boat T-36 was a torpedo boat (a type of small destroyer popular in European navies) built for the Kriegsmarine during the Second World War. Built by Schichau of Elbing, T-36 was the last of fifteen Type 39 torpedo boats, sometimes referred to as the Elbing class. She was laid down in 1942, launched on 5 February 1944 and commissioned on 9 December 1944. T-36 was assigned to general escort duties and stationed in the Baltic.

In January 1945 T-36 was involved in the aftermath of the Wilhelm Gustloff disaster. Wilhelm Gustloff was a passenger liner pressed into service as a transport for Operation Hannibal, the evacuation of East Prussia before the advancing Red Army. As she was fleeing Gotenhafen, on the night of 30 January, crowded with German Navy personnel, servicemen and civilians, she was torpedoed by Soviet submarine S-13. A number of ships attended, including T-36, in order to search for survivors. T-36 was able to pick up 564 survivors from the disaster, which claimed over 9,000 lives.

T-36 was mined off Swinemunde on 4 May 1945 and disabled. She was sunk the following day by a Soviet air attack.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Conway p238

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