Gertrud Schoenberg

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Gertrud Schoenberg (née Kolisch; 11 July 1898 – 14 February 1967) was the second wife of Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg, whom she married in 1924, and the sister of his pupil the violinist Rudolf Kolisch.[1][2][3] She wrote the libretto for Schoenberg's one-act opera Von heute auf morgen under the pseudonym Max Blonda.[4] At her request Schoenberg's (ultimately unfinished) piece, Die Jakobsleiter was prepared for performance by Schoenberg's student Winfried Zillig.[5] After her husband's death in 1951 she founded Belmont Music Publishers devoted to the publication of his works, and was also a key figure in bringing about the premiere of Schoenberg's opera Moses und Aron.[2] Arnold used the notes G and E (German: Es, i.e., "S") for "Gertrud Schoenberg", in the Suite, for septet, Op. 29 (1925).[6]

She is not to be confused with either Gertrud Schönberg (1902–1947), who was Arnold Schoenberg's eldest child by his first wife Mathilde and who later married composer Felix Greissle,[7] or with the soprano Gertrude Schoenberg (1914–1999) who had been a student of Schoenberg's and was the wife of composer Leon Kirchner.[8][9]

Her grandson is lawyer E. Randol Schoenberg.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Neighbour, O[liver] W. (2001), "Schoenberg [Schönberg], Arnold (Franz Walter)", The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell (London: Macmillan Publishers)
  2. ^ a b Shoaf, R. Wayne (1992). "Satellite Collections in the Archive of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute", Journal of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute 15, no. 1 (June): pp.9–110. Citation on p.64.
  3. ^ Silverman, Kenneth (2010). Begin Again: A Biography of John Cage, p.223. ISBN 978-1-4000-4437-5.[full citation needed]
  4. ^ Arnold Schönberg Center, see 1929
  5. ^ Zillig, Winfried (1961). "Arnold Schönbergs 'Jakobsleiter'", Österreichische Musikzeitschrift 16, no. 5 (May), p. 193-204.
  6. ^ MacDonald, Malcolm (2008). Schoenberg, second edition, The Master Musicians Series (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press): p. 216. ISBN 978-0-19-517201-0.
  7. ^ Neighbour, O[liver] W. (2001), "Schoenberg [Schönberg], Arnold (Franz Walter)", The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell (London: Macmillan Publishers)
  8. ^ Gertrude Kirchner obituary on Tributes.com (Accessed November 29, 2011) gives Thursday, January 14 as her date of death, whereas her obituary in the Boston Globe (Wednesday, January 20, 1999) states she "died Sunday of cancer in Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center".
  9. ^ "Leon Kirchner", nndb.com.