Geschwind–Galaburda hypothesis

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The Geschwind–Galaburda hypothesis was proposed by Norman Geschwind and Albert Galaburda to explain sex differences in cognitive abilities by relating them to lateralization of brain function. The basic idea is that differences in maturation rates between the cerebral hemispheres are mediated by circulating testosterone levels, and that sexual maturation acts to fix the hemispheres at different relative stages of development after puberty.

According to the theory, male brains mature later than females, and the left hemisphere matures later than the right.

See also[edit]

References and further reading[edit]

  • Geschwind, N., & Galaburda, A.M. (1987). Cerebral Lateralization: biological mechanisms, associations and pathology. MIT press: Cambridge, MA.
  • Geschwind, N., & Galaburda, A.M. (1985a). Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, associations, and pathology: I. A hypothesis and a program for research. Archives of Neurology, 42, 428–459.
  • Geschwind, N., & Galaburda, A.M. (1985b). Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, associations, and pathology: II. A hypothesis and a program for research. Archives of Neurology, 42, 521–552.
  • Geschwind, N., & Galaburda, A.M. (1985c). Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, associations, and pathology: III. A hypothesis and a program for research. Archives of Neurology, 42, 634–654.
  • Geschwind, N. (1979). Specializations of the Human Brain. Scientific American 241(3):180–199.
  • Geschwind, N. (1972). Language and the Brain. Scientific American 226 (4):76–83.