Giacomo Simoneta

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Giacomo Simoneta (1475–1539) was an Italian Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.

Biography[edit]

Giacomo Simoneta was born in Milan in 1475, the son of Giovanni Simoneta and his second wife Catarina Barbavara.[1]

He studied law in Milan.[2] In 1494, he became a member of the Collegio degli Avvocat in Milan.[3] He became a consistorial advocate in 1505.[4] He became an auditor of the Roman Rota in 1511 and served as the dean of the Roman Rota from 1522 to 1528.[5] He also participated in the Fifth Council of the Lateran from 1512 to 1517.[6]

On July 17, 1528, he was elected bishop of Pesaro.[7] He was consecrated as a bishop on September 14, 1529 in the chapel of San Lorenzo in Piscibus by Cardinal Agostino Spinola.[8] While Paolo Capizzuchi was absent from Rome, Pope Clement VII name Bishop Simoneta to replace him in the matter of the divorce of Henry VIII of England.[9]

Pope Paul III created him a cardinal priest in the consistory of May 21, 1535.[10] He received the red hat and the titular church of San Ciriaco alle Terme Diocleziane on May 31, 1535.[11]

On December 20, 1535, he was named bishop of Perugia.[12] He and six other cardinals were named on April 8, 1536 to a congregation for celebrating an ecumenical council.[13] He was named bishop of Lodi on August 4, 1536, though he later resigned the government of the diocese in favor of his nephew Giovanni Simoneta on June 20, 1537.[14] He opted for the titular church of Sant'Apollinare alle Terme Neroniane-Alessandrine on November 28, 1537.[15] On December 10, 1537, he resigned the administration of Pesaro in favor of his nephew Ludovico Sermoneta, who later became a cardinal himself.[16]

A short time later, he became prefect of the Apostolic Signatura.[17] On January 7, 1538, he and eight other cardinals were named to a second congregation charged with preparing for an ecumenical council.[18] On February 6, 1538, he was appointed to the diocese of Nepi-Sutri.[19] He resigned the government of Perugia on July 20, 1538.[20]

He mediated a dispute between Florence and Siena for control over Montepulciano and was able to broker a mutually agreeable solution.[21] In 1539, he was the papal legate to the Council of Vincenza, along with Cardinals Girolamo Aleander de Motta and Bonifacio Ferreri.[22] On January 10, 1539, he became Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals.[23]

He died in Rome on November 1, 1539.[24] He is buried in Trinità dei Monti.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  2. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  3. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  4. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  5. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  6. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  7. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  8. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  9. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  10. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  11. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  12. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  13. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  14. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  15. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  16. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  17. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  18. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  19. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  20. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  21. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  22. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  23. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  24. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
  25. ^ Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church