Gibsonville, North Carolina

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Gibsonville, North Carolina
Town
Motto: "Good in Gibsonville, Great in the USA!"
Location in Guilford County and the state of North Carolina.
Location in Guilford County and the state of North Carolina.
Coordinates: 36°6′9″N 79°32′21″W / 36.10250°N 79.53917°W / 36.10250; -79.53917Coordinates: 36°6′9″N 79°32′21″W / 36.10250°N 79.53917°W / 36.10250; -79.53917
Country United States
State North Carolina
Counties Guilford, Alamance
Area
 • Total 3.51 sq mi (9.08 km2)
 • Land 3.49 sq mi (9.05 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 732 ft (223 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 6,410
 • Density 1,834/sq mi (708.1/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 27249
Area code(s) 336
FIPS code 37-25980[1]
GNIS feature ID 0985675[2]
Website www.gibsonville.net

Gibsonville is a town in Alamance and Guilford counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is part of the Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area.[1]
The population of Gibsonville as of 2010 was 6,410.[3]

History[edit]

Gibsonville was named for an early settler.[4]

Geography[edit]

Gibsonville is located at 36°06′09″N 79°32′21″W / 36.102628°N 79.539078°W / 36.102628; -79.539078 (36.102628, -79.539078).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.5 square miles (9.1 km2), of which 0.012 square miles (0.03 km2), or 0.28%, is water.[3]

The town is almost evenly split between Alamance and Guilford counties. The town is economically and geographically tied to the town of Elon, and Elon University in Alamance County. Gibsonville was named for Joseph Gibson, a prominent Guilford County planter of the antebellum period. Gibson's Federal-style house remains near Gibsonville and is recognized as a Guilford County landmark property.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 4,372 people, 1,707 households, and 1,206 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,857.3 people per square mile (718.3/km2). There were 1,822 housing units at an average density of 774.0 per square mile (299.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 80.17% White, 15.53% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.75% Asian, 1.74% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.

There were 1,707 households out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the town the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 22.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $42,989, and the median income for a family was $51,164. Males had a median income of $36,025 versus $24,740 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,142. About 5.7% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 18.9% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

Sisters Kay Yow (N.C. State Women's basketball coach) and Deborah Yow (athletic director) are natives of Gibsonville.[6]

The NFL's Torry Holt (Rams & Jaguars) and his brother Terrence Holt (Lions, Cardinals, Bears, Panthers, Saints) are both natives of Gibsonville. The Holts retain close ties to their hometown, and each summer they hold "The Holt Brothers' Football Camp" where every Gibsonville child is provided with a day of football and fun.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Gibsonville town, North Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved July 1, 2013. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 137. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ News & Observer

External links[edit]