Gin and Juice

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"Gin and Juice"
Single by Snoop Doggy Dogg
from the album Doggystyle
Released January 15, 1994
Format 12-inch single
Recorded January 1993
Genre West Coast hip hop, g-funk, gangsta rap
Length 3:31
Label Death Row Records, Interscope Records, Atlantic Records
Writer(s) Harry Wayne "K.C." Casey, Andre Young, Richard Finch, Calvin Broadus
Producer(s) Dr. Dre
Certification Platinum (RIAA)
Snoop Doggy Dogg singles chronology
"What's My Name"
(1993)
"Gin and Juice"
(1994)
"Doggy Dogg World"
(1994)

"Gin and Juice" is the second single by rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg from his debut album Doggystyle. A top 10 hit single on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, peaking at number eight, "Gin and Juice" was nominated for the 1995 Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance. It was voted the 69th Greatest Rap song as ranked in rap.about.com[1] and number eight on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop.[2]

"Gin and Juice" was produced by Dr. Dre and contains an interpolation from Slave's "Watching You" in its chorus and a sample from George McCrae's "I Get Lifted" as its bassline; additional vocalists on the song include Dat Nigga Daz, Jewell, Heney Loc, and Sean "Barney" Thomas. "Gin and Juice" has been covered by other groups, including alternative country group The Gourds in 1996, lounge singer Richard Cheese in 2004, and comedians Naked Trucker and T-Bones in 2007.

Lyrics[edit]

The lyrics depict a party filled with sex, marijuana, and alcohol continuing into the small hours of the morning. The iconic chorus is:

Rollin' down the street smokin' indo
Sippin' on gin and juice
Laid back (with my mind on my money and my money on my mind).[3]

One critic describes the chorus as representative of "the G-funk tableau" emphasizing cruising culture, consumption of depressants, and materialism.[4] The last line is an example of antimetabole, the figure of speech in which two or more clauses are related to each other through a reversal of structures. The focus on money is shared throughout Hip Hop, including It's All About the Benjamins,[5] Money Makes the World Go Round, Get Money, and Foe Tha Love of $.[6]

Summary[edit]

The song begins with a sound effect of a human urinating, followed by an interlude in which an unknown male is speaking, denouncing one of his associates for either committing maternal-sodomy in the immediate vicinity or for having bad breath, it remains unclear which. The unknown male requests some bubblegum, presumably to remedy the situation.

We are then introduced to the narrator, Snoop Dogg, as he discusses the exigencies of his life; his hometown of Long Beach, California, is very dramatic. He finds the will to create his unique musical style amidst all this drama, and does so daily. He then entreats the listener (affectionately called a “g”) to enjoy his tale in said musical style.

Snoop Dogg's tale starts at 2 am in his home, where a party has been taking place and is continuing late into the night, because his mother is away. Women are copulating in his living room, presumably in a lesbian fashion, and intend to do so until 6 am, when they will leave. Snoop Dogg and his associates decide to join the sapphic women. Ever-prepared, they pull condoms out of their pockets before turning off the lights and shutting the doors behind them.

After making it clear that his regard for the females does not involve love, Snoop Dogg and his associates decide that the use of one ounce of marijuana would be a fitting tribute to the act and his regard of the situation and the women. Rather than go into details of what is taking place behind closed doors, he tells the listeners (affectionately called “motherfuckas”) to reminisce of revelry in general, preferably while bouncing.

The said revelry consists of the chorus line and the subject of the song title: cruising down the street, smoking marijuana, and sipping on gin and an unnamed juice. The unnamed juice is likely of citrus origin, though the properties of gin are agreeable to all fruit juices. It is possible that the previous scene, and the upcoming scenes, are projected memories of the narrators told in the present tense. Mr. Dogg then attempts a palindrome about his constant preoccupation with pecuniary matters.

In another memory, Snoop Dogg has procured a bottle of Seagrams brand gin, and is intent on consuming it himself, but his associates have worked up a thirst as well. They present their empty cups for Mr. Dogg to fill, but have not offered any payment for the alcohol. Snoop Dogg is angry at the prospect of sharing his alcoholic beverage without consideration, as these requests happen all too often. He acknowledges their requests, but reminds them that his needs come first.

Snoop Dogg quickly diffuses the situation by reminding the listener that he is very good at cultivating music that captivates his listeners. He wants to know, “Who listens to the words that I speak?” This is most likely a rhetorical question. We do not learn if he ever does share the Seagrams.

Snoop Dogg leaves the party with his beverage to the middle of the street, presumably because his house party has grown beyond the bounds of his yard. He meets a young lady named Sadie who had previously dated one of his associates. He flirts with the young lady, but does not expect physical contact because the weather has remained a sultry 80 degrees Fahrenheit. As she initiates physical contact with his testicles, the heat becomes too much. Snoop tells Sadie to get off of his scrotum and informs her she will not get further contact with that part of him. He says “at ease”, likely to calm down Sadie, but also in an attempt to relax all involved. Snoop Dogg then runs off to engage in an act of mobbing with his associates (affectionately called the “Dog Pound”) in order to cool off and feel a breeze. He urges all to do the same.

We return to the chorus narration, where Snoop Dogg continues to consume marijuana and gin and juice while cruising in a vehicle. He is still concerned about his financial situation, again stated palindromically.

The narrator then recalls a memory that happened later in the same day, presumably at the house party. His friend, Dr. Dre, pays Snoop Dogg a visit, presenting him with several bottles of Tanqueray brand gin and a very well-endowed joint of marijuana. The marijuana is of a strength colloquially described as lethal, as he cleverly alludes to through a reference to the bubonic plague. The combination of drugs proves too intoxicating for Snoop Dogg, and he is forced to imbibe less vivaciously, but he refuses to stop altogether. Snoop Dre then introduces Snoop Dogg to some women who he has brought from a neighboring city in Los Angeles. Snoop Dogg makes his intents to bed (or cot) the women clear, but warns them beforehand that he does not intend to make them climax nor stay with them after copulation has occurred, because he does not love them. Women whom he does not love he refers to as “hoes”, the origin of which is unclear, but is in no way related to the garden tool.

The song ends with a repetition of the chorus one more time, where some spontaneous words are uttered after the title verse (a slang word phonetically spelled BEE-OTCH). Mr Dogg's mental preoccupation with money matters is restated multiple times, likely in attempt to finally make a palindrome, but never succeeding.

Music video[edit]

The song's music video, directed by Dr. Dre, Calvin Caday and Anita Sisaath,[citation needed] also producers of 2Pac's "Dear Mama", features a simple concept: teenager Snoop throws a wild house party after his parents leave the house. Ricky Harris plays Snoop's father, and Dr. Dre, Warren G, Nate Dogg and Daz Dillinger make cameo appearances. Six-year-old rapper Lil Bow Wow plays Snoop's little brother who is jumping on the couch in the intro. "I was in the 'Gin and Juice' video," comedian Eddie Griffin recalled. "I pop out of this little Volkswagen full of weed smoke with my hair standing on end."[7]

The small-budget idea was later re-purposed in videos such as J-Kwon's "Tipsy" and Oowee's "Why Cry", which features Snoop and is a shot-by-shot remake of the "Gin and Juice" video. The music video was parodied in the video for "DPK", where Snoop, carried on the front of a bicycle, gets hit by a car driven by B.G. Knocc Out and Dresta, two of Eazy-E's protégés with whom Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre had feuds at the time.

In April 2005, the video was fourth on MTV2 and XXL's list of the 25 Greatest West Coast Videos.[citation needed] Snoop Dogg wears hockey jerseys of the now-defunct Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League and Pittsburgh Penguins (with the name and number 'GIN AND JUICE' 94 on the back) in the video.

Covers/alternate versions[edit]

Track listing[edit]

  1. Gin and Juice (Radio Version (No Indo))
  2. Gin and Juice (Radio Version)
  3. Gin and Juice (Laid Back Remix)
  4. Gin and Juice (Laid Back Radio Mix)

Charts performance[edit]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Adaso, Henry. "100 Greatest Rap Songs". About.com. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "VH1’s 100 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs". prefixmag.com. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Shapiro, Fred R. (2006), The Yale Book of Quotations, Yale University Press, p. 717, ISBN 0-300-10798-6 
  4. ^ Quinn, Eithne (2005), Nuthin' But a "G" Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap, Columbia University Press, p. 144, ISBN 0-231-12408-2 
  5. ^ Banfield, William C. (2004), Black Notes: Essays Of A Musician Writing In A Post-Album Age, Scarecrow Press, p. 138, ISBN 0-8108-5287-X 
  6. ^ Werner, Craig Hansen (2006), A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race & the Soul of America, University of Michigan Press, p. 314, ISBN 0-472-03147-3 
  7. ^ Blender, 2004, precise date unknown
  8. ^ Kung, Michelle (September 30, 2010). "Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon's ‘History of Rap' Duet: The Full Set List". The Wall Street Journal. 
  9. ^ "Billboard Top 100 – 1994". longboredsurfer.com/. Retrieved 27 August 2010. 

External links[edit]