Giuliano Urbani

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Giuliano Urbani
Minister of Cultural Heritage
In office
10 June 2001 – 23 April 2005
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi
Preceded by Giovanna Melandri
Succeeded by Rocco Buttiglione
State Minister for Public Administration and Regional Affairs
In office
11 May 1994 – 17 January 1995
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi
Personal details
Born (1937-06-09) 9 June 1937 (age 77)
Perugia
Nationality Italian
Political party Forza Italia

Giuliano Urbani (born 9 June 1937) is an Italian academic and politician. He was the minister of cultural heritage from 2001 to 2005.

Early life[edit]

Urbani was born in Perugia on 9 June 1937.[1]

Career and activities[edit]

Urbani is an academic. He taught political sciences at Bocconi University in Milan until 1994.[2] He was also collaborator of Fininvest.[3]

He is cofounder and a leading member of the Forza Italia led by Silvio Berlusconi.[2][4][5] He contributed to the development of the party's ideology.[4] From 11 May 1994 to 17 January 1995 he served as state minister for public administration and regional affairs in the first cabinet of Berlusconi.[6] He was appointed minister of cultural heritage to the cabinet headed by Prime Minister Berlusconi on 10 June 2001.[7][8] Urbani was in office until 23 April 2005 when he was replaced by Rocco Buttiglione in the post.[7][9]

In addition he served at the Italian Parliament for three successive terms from 1996 to 2005.[1] He was elected from Lombardia with the Forza Italia in all terms.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Giuliano Urbani". Italian Parliament. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Sergiyevsky, Alexander (September 2004). "Interview with the Italian Minister for Culture and the Arts Giuliano Urbani". Herald of Europe (1). Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  3. ^ Stephen Gundle; Simon Parker (1996). The New Italian Republic: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Berlusconi. New York: Routledge. p. 38. Retrieved 1 September 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)
  4. ^ a b John Hooper (20 August 2004). "Spectre of closure haunts the Uffizi". The Guardian (Rome). Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  5. ^ Louise Hemmer Phil (14 August 2002). "Italian minister: The final decisions rest with the governments". EUobserver. Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  6. ^ "Urbani, Giuliano". Italian Parliament. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Urbani, Giuliano". Italian Parliament. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  8. ^ "Berlusconi wins senate confidence". BBC. 20 June 2001. Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "Italy: Berlusconi III Sworn In; Likely to Be Confirmed This Week". Wikileaks. 26 April 2005. Retrieved 1 September 2013.