Giuseppe Giannini

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Giuseppe Giannini
Giuseppe Giannini 1983.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth (1964-08-20) 20 August 1964 (age 49)
Place of birth Rome, Italy
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Manager (former attacking midfielder)
Club information
Current team
Lebanon (manager)
Youth career
1978–1980 Almas Roma
1980–1983 Roma
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1981–1996 Roma 318 (49)
1996–1997 Sturm Graz 16 (2)
1997–1998 Napoli 4 (0)
1998–1999 Lecce 47 (4)
Total 385 (55)
National team
1984–1986 Italy U-21 16 (1)
1986–1991 Italy 47 (6)
Teams managed
2004–2005 Foggia
2006 Sambenedettese
2006–2007 Argeş Piteşti
2007–2008 Massese
2008–2010 Gallipoli
2010 Verona
2011 Grosseto
2013– Lebanon
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 6 June 2007.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 6 June 2007

Giuseppe Giannini (Italian pronunciation: [dʒuˈzɛppe dʒanˈnini]; born 20 August 1964 in Rome) is a former Italian international footballer, who most recently served as head coach of Serie B side Grosseto. He spent the majority of his 16-year playing career with A.S. Roma and was regarded by supporters as a club symbol before his successor Francesco Totti.

Club career[edit]

Giannini began his career as a youngster with Almas Roma, a club based in Rome. From a young age he attracted the attention of many of Italy's top clubs, eventually signing with Roma ahead of rivals including S.S. Lazio and A.C. Milan. He made his Serie A debut on 31 January 1982 in a 1–0 defeat to A.C. Cesena and went on to make over 400 appearances for the club over the following fifteen years. During his time at Roma, whom he went on to captain, he won Serie A once and the Coppa Italia three times, he also played in the UEFA Cup final during the 1990–91 season

In 1996 Giannini left Roma to play in Austria for Sturm Graz, with whom he spent just half a season before returning to Italy due to homesickness. Before retiring in 1998 Giannini had brief spells with Napoli and Lecce.

International career[edit]

The Italian national team capped Giannini 47 times. He made his international debut against Malta in a European Championship qualifier in December 1986, he went on to represent Italy at both the 1988 European Championships and the 1990 World Cup. Giannini's final appearance for his country came on 12 October 1991 against the Soviet Union. He was often referred to as "Il Principe" (The Prince) by Italian sports journalists during his playing career,[1] a reference to his grace on the pitch.

Managerial career[edit]

Giannini has worked as a match analyst for RAI following his retirement; he also served as the manager of Serie C1 club Foggia from July 2003 to January 2005, when he was sacked. He started the season 2005–06 at the helm of Serie C1 side Sambenedettese, but was fired on February 2006. Later that year, Giannini then served as coach of Romanian side Argeş Piteşti, but was axed in October after nine consecutive defeats, and replaced by Dorinel Munteanu. On September 2007 he was unveiled as new manager of Massese, another Serie C1 club,[2] being however sacked on February 2008 following disagreements with the board.[3]

On July 2008 he was unveiled as new head coach of Lega Pro Prima Divisione team Gallipoli.[4] In his first season in Salento, Giannini guided Gallipoli to triumph in the league, thus winning a historical first promotion in Serie B for the club.[5] A few days later, however, Giannini and Gallipoli announced to have parted company, also because of financial issues involving the club and some rumoured interest for Giannini from other clubs.[6] Nevertheless, Giannini was then confirmed as coach by new Gallipoli owner D'Odorico.

Despite an impressive first half of season with Gallipoli, who was hailed as one of the main league surprises, Giannini resigned from his managerial post on 8 February 2010 following a 2–2 home draw to Grosseto characterized by the team players stopping for 40 seconds and turning faces towards the stadium stands as a form of protest for not having been paid any monthly salaries since October 2009. At the end of the first half, Giannini was sent off due to protests, and reached the stands in the second half, where he heatedly confronted with chairman D'Odorico and announced his resignation, together with all members of his coaching staff, immediately after the end of the game.[7] However, Giannini withdrew his resignation only two days later following a conciliatory meeting with D'Odorico.[8]

After a string of unimpressive results, Giannini stepped down again on 22 March together with his aides Roberto Corti, Fabrizio Carafa and Franco Mandarino, defining his resignations as "irrevocable".[9]

On June 2010 he agreed a two-year contract as head coach of fallen giants Verona, with the aim to guide the scaligeri to promotion from the Lega Pro Prima Divisione league.[10]

On 30 October 2011 he was appointed head coach of Serie B club Grosseto.[11] He left his post later on 3 December, after a 2–1 win at Pescara (the third consecutive away win during his stint as Grosseto boss), citing his strained relationship with chairman Piero Camilli as the main reason behind his choice.[12] On 6 July 2013, Giannini was officially appointed as the manager of the Lebanese National Team, where he will try to continue the historic success of Lebanon after their qualification to the final round of World Cup 2014 in Brazil.

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Manager[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

Team Season Domestic
Leagues
Domestic Cups1 European
Competitions2
Other Tournaments3 Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Roma 1981–82 1 0 - - - - - - 1 0
1982–83 - - 2 0 - - - - 2 0
1983–84 2 0 3 0 - - - - 5 0
1984–85 26 4 6 1 5 0 - - 37 5
1985–86 22 2 13 3 - - - - 35 5
1986–87 25 3 7 2 2 0 - - 34 5
1987–88 28 11 7 1 - - - - 35 12
1988–89 32 6 6 4 6 1 - - 44 11
1989–90 31 3 5 2 - - - - 36 5
1990–91 24 3 8 0 10 2 - - 42 5
1991–92 24 4 3 1 4 0 1 0 32 5
1992–93 29 9 9 4 8 3 - - 46 16
1993–94 26 3 3 0 - - - - 29 3
1994–95 28 1 6 1 - - - - 34 2
1995–96 20 0 1 0 3 1 - - 24 1
Sturm Graz 1996–97 16 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 21 3
Napoli 1997–98 4 0 1 1 - - - - 5 1
Lecce 1997–98 14 0 - - - - - - 14 0
1998–99 33 4 3 0 - - - - 36 4
Career Total 385 55 85 21 40 7 2 0 512 83

1Domestic cups include the Coppa Italia and Austrian Cup
2European competitions include the European Cup, Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Cup
3Other tournaments include the Supercoppa Italiana and Austrian Supercup

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Roma all-time XI". Channel 4. 8 January 2009. Retrieved 8 January 2009. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Massese: Giannini nuovo allenatore" (in Italian). RAI Sport. 18 September 2007. Archived from the original on 11 December 2007. Retrieved 19 September 2007. 
  3. ^ "UFFICIALE: Giannini esonerato dalla Massese" (in Italian). TuttoMercatoWeb. 13 February 2008. Retrieved 1 April 2008. 
  4. ^ "UFFICIALE: Giannini nuovo tecnico del Gallipoli" (in Italian). TuttoMercatoWeb. 12 July 2008. Retrieved 12 July 2008. 
  5. ^ "Gallipoli in serie B Foggia nei playoff" (in Italian). La Gazzetta del Mezzogiorno. 17 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  6. ^ "Giannini, addio al Gallipoli Non potevo più aspettare" (in Italian). La Gazzetta del Mezzogiorno. 17 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-16. 
  7. ^ "Gallipoli, protesta e tensione Pareggio e Giannini si dimette" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 8 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  8. ^ "Gallipoli, Giannini torna in panchina" (in Italian). La Corriere dello Sport – Stadio. 10 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-10. [dead link]
  9. ^ "Gallipoli, Giannini se ne va Si è dimesso un'altra volta" (in Italian). Corriere dello Sport – Stadio. 22 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-22. 
  10. ^ "UFFICIALE: Hellas Verona, Giannini nuovo allenatore" (in Italian). TuttoMercatoWeb. 23 June 2010. Retrieved 2010-06-23. 
  11. ^ "Primo allenamento di Giannini" (in Italian). U.S. Grosseto F.C. 29 October 2011. Retrieved 29 October 2011. 
  12. ^ "Giannini prima salva la panchina, poi se ne va." (in Italian). US Grosseto FC. 3 December 2011. Retrieved 4 December 2011. 
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Carlo Ancelotti
A.S. Roma captain
1987–1996
Succeeded by
Amedeo Carboni