Glücksgas Stadium

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Glücksgas Stadium
2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Stadium Dresden
Glücksgas-Stadion Logo.png
Womens' World Cup Dresden 2011 USA vs North Korea Stadium 3.jpg
Former names Güntz Wiesen, Sportplatz an der Lenèstraße, Illgenkampfbahn, Gauforum Sachsen, Dynamo-Stadium, Stadion Dresden, Rudolf Harbig- Stadium (Dresden)
Location Dresden, Germany
Owner City of Dresden (Guarantor with tax money)
Operator SG Dynamo Dresden e. V.,
Stadion Dresden Projektgesellschaft mbH & Co KG,
HBM Stadien- und Sportstättenbau GmbH & Co. KG,
Sportfive GmbH & Co. KG
Executive suites Boxes 18
VIP 1366
Businessclub 1
Promenade 1
Capacity 32,085
21,030 seats
11.055 admissions
2.000 guests
71 press
56 wheelchair
18 suites
700 parking[1]
27,190 (seating only)
36,000 (concert)
Field size 105m x 68m (7140m²)
Surface Grass
Construction
Built 1922 to 1923
Opened 18 March 1874; 140 years ago (1874-03-18)
1900
16 June 1923
23 September 1951
September 1990
15 September 2009
Renovated 1951 (adjustment of World War II destruction)
9 March 1969 (floodlight pylons)
6 July 1979 (scoreboard)
1990 (Bundesliga standards)
2005 (fences and security)
Closed 1944–1951
Demolished 13 February 1945 (Dresden bombing)
November 2007 (new construction)
Construction cost 1923: RM 500.000;
2009: 45.000.000
Architect Hermann Ilgen (1922–1923)
Günter Schöneberg & Manfred Mortensen (1969)[2]
b+p Projekt (2007–2009)[3]
Tenants
Dynamo Dresden

Glücksgas Stadium (German: Glücksgas-Stadion, German pronunciation: [ˈɡlʏksɡaːs ˈʃtaːdi̯ɔn]) is a football stadium in Dresden, Saxony. It is the current home of Dynamo Dresden. The facility is known as the Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion or Dynamo Stadion. In December 2010, the naming rights were sold for 5 years for 500'000 Eur yearly to Bavarian energy company Goldgas which wanted to promote its Glücksgas brandname.[4][5] Sports facilities have existed on the physical site of the stadium since 1874, and the site noted an attendance of 270,000 people during the 1885 festival.

History[edit]

The former stadium was completed on 16 June 1923 at a cost of 500,000 German reichsmark allocated for the expansion of the existing Ilgen-Kampfbahn centrally located in the inner city. The football club Dresdensia was the first organization to use the new facility.

In 1953, the Sportvereinigung Dynamo took over the stadium and on 23 September 1953, the stadium was renamed for athlete Rudolf Harbig. In the summer of 1971, it was renamed Dynamo-Stadion for the football club Dynamo Dresden which used the stadium as its home ground. The capacity of the stadium was twice expanded: to 36,000 in 1976 and then to 38,500 in 1980. The current capacity is approximately 23,940 seats (220 roofed and 10,670 open). The usual capacity is often lowered where there are security concerns.

In 1990, the stadium was upgraded to meet German Football Association (Deutscher Fussball Bund or German Football Association) and FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association or International Federation of Association Football) standards and the national building code. This included improved security measures to help protect players and referees. Benches have been replaced by individual seats and the pitch was re-sodded, the first time since 1956 that the playing surface has been renewed with the €375,000 cost being borne by the city of Dresden. That same year, the facility was again named for Rudolf Harbig. Currently it is used primarily for football matches and still serves as the home of Dynamo Dresden.

Since 1 January 1992, the stadium has been under the control of the City of Dresden in order to protect the site should Dynamo Dresden ever face financial problems. On 9 May 2007, German sports magazine kicker reported that an agreement has been reached with the City to finance the complete renovation of the stadium into a modern 32,400-seat arena by 2009.

The stadium in its new form was completely opened on 15 September 2009 with a sold-out friendly match against Schalke 04, which Dynamo lost 1–2. Some building work is expected to continue until the end of the year,[needs update] but this match opened the new stadium to full capacity.

The first and only concert staged at the venue was a Wolfgang Petry concert on 17 July 1999, with about 5,000 people in attendance.[6]

2011 Women's World Cup host[edit]

On 30 September 2008, it was announced that Dresden had been chosen to be a host city for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. As a result, the old stadium that had stood on the site for over 100 years was torn down and completely rebuilt.[7] The ceremonial "first kickoff" in the newly-rebuilt stadium was taken by the director of the German organizing committee for the World Cup, Steffi Jones[8]

The director of the local Dresden organizing committee for the World Cup is Klaus Reichenbach (who is also president of Saxon Football Federation (SFV))[9]

State cup- and international matches[edit]

National FDGB-Cup finals[edit]

Date Local time Home Final score (halftime score) Visitor Game type Attendance
1969-05-31 15:00 1. FCM 4:0 (1:0) Goals scored: Jörg Ohm (FCM) 28', Joachim Walter (FCM) 51', Jörg Ohm (FCM) 60', Jürgen Sparwasser (FCM) 68' – Television: Deutscher Fernsehfunk FCK FDGB-Cup- finals – Referee: Hans-Joachim Schulz (Görlitz) 20,000[10]
1970-15-06 15:00 Vorwärts Berlin 4:2 (2:0) Goals scored: Begerad (Vorwärts) 4', H. Wruck (Vorwärts) 15', Gießner 52' (Lok, own goal), Löwe (Lok) 62', Köditz (Lok) 67', Nöldner (Vorwärts) 82' – Television: Deutscher Fernsehfunk Lok Leipzig FDGB-Cup- finals – Referee: Gerhard Kunze (FC Karl-Marx-Stadt) 22,000[11]

2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup[edit]

Date Local time Home Final score (halftime score) Visitor Game type Attendance
2010-07-14 15:00 Switzerland Switzerland 0:4 (0:2) Goals scored: Ji, So Yun (KOR) 34', Lee, Hyun Young (KOR) 42', Ji, So Yun (KOR) 52', Ji, So Yun (KOR) 64' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA South Korea South Korea 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group D – Referee: Silvia Reyes (PER) 9,430[12]
2010-07-14 18:00 United States United States 1:1 (0:1) Goals scored: Elizabeth Cudjoe (GHA) 7', Sydney Leroux (USA) 70' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA Ghana Ghana 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group D – Referee: Dagmar Damková (CZE) 9,430[13]
2010-07-17 15:00 Ghana Ghana 2:4 (1:1) Goals scored: Deborah Afriyie (GHA) 28', Ji, So Yun (KOR) 41', Elizabeth Cudjoe (GHA) 56', Kim, Narae (KOR) 62', Kim, Jin Young (KOR) 70', Ji, So Yun (KOR) 87' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA South Korea South Korea 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group D – Referee: Christina Pedersen (NOR) 17,234[14]
2010-07-17 18:00 United States United States 5:0 (3:0) Goals scored: Kristie Mewis (USA) 4', Sydney Leroux (USA) 23', Zakiya Bywaters (USA) 25', Sydney Leroux (USA) 52', Sydney Leroux (USA) 76' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA Switzerland Switzerland 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group D – Referee: Etsuko Fukano (JPN) 17,234[15]
2010-07-20 11:30 Costa Rica Costa Rica 0:3 (0:2) Goals scored: Daniela Montoya (COL) 24', Daniela Montoya (COL) 40', Yorely Rincon (COL) 90'+3 (penalty) – Television: Eurosport, FIFA Colombia Colombia 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group A – Referee: Cristina Dorcioman (ROU) 12,863[16]
2010-07-20 14:30 New Zealand New Zealand 1:4 (0:1) Goals scored: Ludmila (BRA) 25', Leah (BRA) 59', Debora (BRA) 87', Rosie White (NZL) 89', Debora (BRA) 90' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA Brazil Brazil 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Group B – Referee: Dagmar Damková (CZE) 12,863[17]
2010-07-25 18:30 Mexico Mexico 1:3 (0:2) Goals scored: Lee, Hyun Young (KOR) 14', Ji, So Yun (KOR) 28', Lee, Hyun Young (KOR) 67', Natalia Gomez Junco (MEX) 83' – Television: Eurosport, FIFA South Korea South Korea 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Quarterfinals – Referee: Dagmar Damková (CZE) 21,146[18]

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup[edit]

Date Local time Home Final score (halftime score) Visitor Game type Attendance
2011-06-28 18:15 United States United States 2:0 (0:0) Goals scored:Cheney (USA) 54', Buehler (USA) 76': – Television:ESPN (USA) North Korea North Korea 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Group C – Referee:Bibiana Steinhaus (GER) 21,859[19]
2011-07-01 18:15 New Zealand New Zealand 1:2 (1:0) Goals scored: Gregorius (NZL) 18', Scott (ENG) 63', Clarke (ENG) 81' – Television:ESPN (USA) England England 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B– Referee: Therese Neguel (CMR) 19,110 [20]
2011-07-05 20:45 Canada Canada 0:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Nkwocha (NGA) 73' – Television: ESPN (USA) Nigeria Nigeria 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A – Referee: Finau Vulivuli (FIJ) 13,638[21]
2011-07-10 17:30 Brazil Brazil 2:2 a.e.t. (3:5 PSO) (0:1) Goals scored: Daiane (BRA) 2' OG, Marta (BRA) 68'(Pen), 92', Wambach (USA) 120'+2 – Television: ESPN(USA) United States United States 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup quarterfinals – Referee:Jacqui Melksham (AUS) 25,598[22]

Other international football matches[edit]

Date Local time Home Final score (halftime score) Visitor Game type Attendance
1911-10-09 16:00 German Empire Germany 1:2 (0:0) Goals scored: Schmieger (AUT) '25, Willi Worpitzky (GER) '35, Neumann (AUT) '49 Austria-Hungary Austria Exhibition game – Referee: Herbert James Willing (NED) 7,500[23][24]
1923-08-12 16:00 Weimar Republic Germany 1:2 (0:0) Goals scored: Henry Müller own goal (GER) 10', Linna (FIN) 27', Walter Claus-Oehler (GER) 31' Finland Finland Exhibition game – Referee: Johannes Mutters (NED) 25,000[25]
1992-10-14 18:00 Germany Germany 1:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Rudi Völler (GER) 58', Carlos Hermosillo (MEX) 72' – Television: Das Erste Mexico Mexico Exhibition game – Referee: Jozef Marko (CZE) 27,000[26]
2010-04-22 18:00 Germany Germany (Women) *:* (*:*) Cancelled (2010 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull) Sweden Sweden (Women) Exhibition game N/A[27]
2010-09-15 18:00 Germany Germany (Women) 5:0 (1:0) Goals scored: Inka Grings (GER) 2' (penalty), Fatmire Bajramaj (GER) 54', Alexandra Popp (GER) 76', Melanie Behringer (GER) 79', Celia Okoyino da Mbabi (GER) 83' – Television: Das Erste, DFB TV Canada Canada (Women) Exhibition game, U-20 World Champion winner ceremony, Birthday of Helmut Schön, Honor for Inka Grings – Referee: Dagmar Damková (CZE) 20,431[27]

Statistics[edit]

Media[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Panorama taken during the rehearsal for the 33rd German Evangelical Church Assembly

Movies about[edit]

  • New Media Group Enterprises (Dresden): "Dynamo's Kultstätte": Documentation The New Stadium (Trailer) – Dresden: 30 September 2009 (German)

Literature about[edit]

Maps or cards about[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fakten – Stadion-Neubau für Dresden – Offizielle Internetseite[dead link]
  2. ^ "Fussballstadion für den Club "Dynamo Dresden" am Grossen Garten". Das-neue-dresden.de. 1951-09-23. Retrieved 2010-10-11. 
  3. ^ [1][dead link]
  4. ^ Dynamo-Fans wollen Stadionnamen kaufen, Sächsische Zeitung online, 2012-10-15.
  5. ^ http://www.sportspromedia.com/news/gluecksgas_get_naming_rights_to_dynamo_dresden_stadium/ Gluckgas get naming rights, retrieved 2011 04 07.
  6. ^ Wolfgang Petry
  7. ^ FIFA profile of Dresden
  8. ^ SG Dynamo Dresden – Offizielle Homepage: Bilderdatenbank – Stadioneröffnung am 15.09.2009 – Steffi Jones mit dem Ehrenanstoß
  9. ^ Sächsischer Fussballverband e.V. – Startseite
  10. ^ The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation; East Germany 1968/69 – Fußball OBERLIGA der Demokratischen Sportbewegung 1968/1969; 16 Oct 2005
  11. ^ The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation; East Germany 1969/70 – Fußball OBERLIGA der Demokratischen Sportbewegung 1969/1970; 16 Oct 2005
  12. ^ FIFA.com – FIFA U-20-Frauen-Weltmeisterschaft: Schweiz 0:4 (0:2) Korea Republik – Spielbericht. De.fifa.com. Retrieved on 2011-03-04.
  13. ^ FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  14. ^ FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  15. ^ USA – Switzerland. FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  16. ^ Costa Rica – Colombia. FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  17. ^ New Zealand – Brazil, FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  18. ^ Mexico – Korea Republic, FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup Germany 2010 Match Report, de.fifa.com.
  19. ^ Match Report – USA v. PRK
  20. ^ FIFA Official NZL-ENG Match Report
  21. ^ Official FIFA.com CAN-NGA Match Report
  22. ^ FIFA Official Match Report: BRA-USA
  23. ^ T-Online Soccer Results: Deutschland gegen Finnland in Dresden
  24. ^ RP-Online, DFB-Bilanz gegen Österreich; 31 Oct 2010
  25. ^ T-Online Soccer Results: Deutschland gegen Finnland in Dresden
  26. ^ DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. – Alle Spiele. Dfb.de. Retrieved on 2011-03-04.
  27. ^ a b "Frauen-Länderspiel in Dresden abgesagt" (in German). German Football Association. 20 April 2010. 
  28. ^ Dynamo Dresden: Rasenheizung feiert Premiere – Sport – Fußball – Bild.de
  29. ^ Zimmermann, Gert (2009). Das neue Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion: FANtastische Fans und Emotionen pur. ORKA-MEDIA; page 74.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°02′25″N 13°44′52″E / 51.04028°N 13.74778°E / 51.04028; 13.74778