Gladys Lounsbury Hobby

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Gladys Lounsbury Hobby (November 19, 1910 – July 4, 1993), born in New York City, was an American microbiologist who helped to move penicillin from a laboratory discovery to mass production during World War II.[1]

Graduating from Vassar College in 1931, she went on to receive a doctorate in bacteriology from Columbia University in 1935.[2] In 1940, Hobby was a microbiologist at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University working on infectious diseases with two colleagues, Dr. Karl Meyer, a biochemist, and Dr. Martin Henry Dawson, a clinician and associate professor of medicine.[3] Hobby left Columbia University in 1944 to work for Pfizer Pharmaceuticals in New York where she researched streptomycin and other antibiotics.[4]

In 1959, Hobby left Pfizer to specialized in chronic infectious diseases as chief of research at the Veterans Administration Hospital in East Orange, New Jersey. She also served as an assistant clinical research professor in public health at Cornell University Medical College.[5]

In 1972 she founded the monthly publication, Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, and continued to edit it for eight years. She retired from her main career in 1977. In retirement Hobby wrote over 200 articles, working as a consultant and freelance science writer. She also published a book, Penicillin: Meeting the Challenge,[6] in 1985.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saxon, Wolfgang (July 9, 1993). "Gladys Hobby, 82, Pioneer in Bringing Penicillin to Public". New York Times. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  2. ^ "Gladys Hobby (1910-1993)". National Women's History Museum. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "The Miracle Cure". Vassar College. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "Gladys Hobby (1910-1993)". National Women's History Museum. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  5. ^ Saxon, Wolfgang (July 9, 1993). "Gladys Hobby, 82, Pioneer in Bringing Penicillin to Public". New York Times. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  6. ^ Hobby, Gladys (1985). Penicillin: Meeting the Challenge. Connecticut: Yale University Press. ISBN 9780300032253.