Glasgow, Missouri

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Glasgow, Missouri
City
Location of Glasgow, Missouri
Location of Glasgow, Missouri
Coordinates: 39°13′36″N 92°50′37″W / 39.22667°N 92.84361°W / 39.22667; -92.84361Coordinates: 39°13′36″N 92°50′37″W / 39.22667°N 92.84361°W / 39.22667; -92.84361
Country United States
State Missouri
Counties Howard, Chariton
Area[1]
 • Total 1.42 sq mi (3.68 km2)
 • Land 1.30 sq mi (3.37 km2)
 • Water 0.12 sq mi (0.31 km2)
Elevation 673 ft (205 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,103
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,102
 • Density 848.5/sq mi (327.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 65254
Area code(s) 660
FIPS code 29-27208[4]
GNIS feature ID 0718486[5]

Glasgow is a city in Chariton and Howard counties in the U.S. state of Missouri. The population was 1,103 at the 2010 census.

The Howard County portion of Glasgow is part of the Columbia, Missouri Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

Glasgow is located at 39°13′36″N 92°50′37″W / 39.226555°N 92.843717°W / 39.226555; -92.843717 (39.226555, -92.843717), [6] primarily in Howard County.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.42 square miles (3.68 km2), of which, 1.30 square miles (3.37 km2) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,103 people, 458 households, and 277 families residing in the city. The population density was 848.5 inhabitants per square mile (327.6 /km2). There were 533 housing units at an average density of 410.0 per square mile (158.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.8% White, 7.9% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.5% of the population.

There were 458 households of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.5% were non-families. 35.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the city was 41.9 years. 25.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.7% were from 25 to 44; 28% were from 45 to 64; and 18.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,263 people, 495 households, and 317 families residing in the city. The population density was 946.1 people per square mile (366.7/km2). There were 562 housing units at an average density of 421.0 per square mile (163.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.87% White, 8.47% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.63% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.79% of the population.

There were 495 households out of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.1% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 87.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,242, and the median income for a family was $36,806. Males had a median income of $24,188 versus $17,130 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,544. About 7.1% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 11.2% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Glasgow was laid out and platted in 1836.[7] It was named for James Glasgow, a local merchant.[8]

The Battle of Glasgow was fought on October 15, 1864, in and near Glasgow as part of Price's Missouri Expedition during the American Civil War. Although the battle resulted in a Confederate victory and the capture of significant war material, it had little long-term benefit as Price was ultimately defeated at Westport a week later, bringing his campaign in Missouri to an end.[9]

On January 20, 1891, an African American man, Olli Truxton, was killed by a white lynch mob in Glasgow.[10]

In popular literature[edit]

Glasgow is mentioned in the novel Boone's Lick by Larry McMurtry. The Cecil family stops journeys from Boone's Lick by wagon to meet a flatboat at Glasgow that will take them upriver.

Baseball[edit]

John Donaldson, born February 29, 1892 in Glasgow, was an African-American pitcher who recorded over 4000 strikeouts and 350 wins in the barnstorming leagues in the early 20th century. Eyewitnesses say his was one of the fastest pitchers of the era. John McGraw, manager of the New York Giants, offered him $50,000 to play for the Giants if he would go to Cuba and disguise himself as Cuban. Since it would mean renouncing his family and race, Donaldson refused.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Earngey, Bill (1995). Missouri Roadsides: The Traveler's Companion. University of Missouri Press. p. 101. 
  8. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 175. 
  9. ^ Battle Summary: Glasgow, MO 
  10. ^ NAACP (1919). Thirty Years of Lynching in the United States, 1889—1918. NAACP. p. 80. 

External links[edit]