Glauce

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In Greek mythology, Glauce (/ˈɡlɔːs/; Ancient Greek: Γλαυκή "blue-gray"), Latin Glauca, refers to different people:

  1. Glauce, daughter of Creon. She married Jason. She was killed, along with her father, by Medea, who either sent her a peplos steeped in flammable poison or set fire to the royal palace.[1][2] In the local Corinthian tradition, Glauce threw herself into a well in a vain attempt to wash off Medea's poison; from this circumstance the well became known as the Well of Glauce.[3] Also known by the name Creusa, predominantly in Latin authors, e.g. Seneca (Medea) and Propertius (2.16.30). Hyginus (Fab. 25) uses both names interchangeably.
  2. Glauce, one of the Nereids.[4][5][6]
  3. Glauce, one of the Danaids, daughter of Danaus. She married Alces, son of Aegyptus and an Arabian woman.[7]
  4. Glauce, daughter of Cychreus, son of Poseidon and Salamis. Some sources say that Glauce married Actaeus and bore him a son Telamon.[8] Others say that Telamon was her husband and that, after her death, he married Periboea, mother of Ajax.[9]
  5. Glauce, an Arcadian nymph, one of the nurses of Zeus.[10]
  6. Glauce, an Amazon.[11] Some say that it was she, and not Antiope, who was abducted by Theseus and became his wife.[12][13]
  7. Glauce, daughter of Cycnus, sister of Cobis and Corianus. During the Trojan campaign, she was taken captive by the Greeks and was given to Ajax,[14] by whom she became mother of Aeantides.[15]
  8. Glauce, one of the Melian nymphs.[16]
  9. Glauce, mother, by Upis, of "the third" Artemis in Cicero's rationalized genealogy of the Greek gods.[17]
  10. Glauce, twin sister of Pluto who died as an infant according to Euhemerus.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bibliotheca 1. 9. 28
  2. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 54. 2 - 6
  3. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2. 3. 6
  4. ^ Homer, Iliad, 18. 39
  5. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 244
  6. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, Preface
  7. ^ Bibliotheca 2. 1. 5
  8. ^ Bibliotheca 3. 12. 6 with reference to Pherecydes
  9. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 72. 7
  10. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8. 47. 3
  11. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 163
  12. ^ Bibliotheca, Epitome of Book 4, 5. 2
  13. ^ Scholia on Iliad, 3. 189
  14. ^ Dictys Cretensis, 2. 13
  15. ^ Dictys Cretensis, 5. 16
  16. ^ Tzetzes on Theogony, 101
  17. ^ Cicero, De natura deorum, 3. 23
  18. ^ Lactantius, Institutiones Divinae, 1. 14. 5, citing Ennius