Glen E. Morrell

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Glen E. Morrell
Glen Morrell.jpg
SMA Glen E. Morrell
Born (1936-05-26) May 26, 1936 (age 78)
Wick, West Virginia
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1954-1987
Rank Sergeant Major of the Army
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Army Distinguished Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal (3)
Army Commendation Medal (4)

Glen E. Morrell was the seventh Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on July 1, 1983 and served until July, 1987. He was born in Wick, West Virginia, on May 26, 1936.

Military career[edit]

He served in the United States Army for over 31 years.[1] After his entry on active duty in November 1954 he served in virtually every noncommissioned officer leadership position. His career took him through many CONUS assignments, two tours in Europe, three tours in the Republic of Vietnam and two tours in Panama. Morrell attended Ranger School at Fort Benning, Ga., at the age of forty-one and was selected as the Distinguished Honor Graduate for his class.[2]

His units of assignment include the 6th Infantry in Berlin; 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Germany; 82d Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; 5th Special Forces Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and three tours in the Republic of Vietnam; two tours with the 7th and 8th Special Forces Group, Panama; 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas; Reserve Officer Training Corps instructor duty with St. John University, Minnesota; 1st Ranger Battalion, 75th Infantry, Fort Stewart, Georgia, Special Forces Detachment (Airborne) Europe; United States Army Recruiting Command, Fort Sheridan, Illinois; and the United States Army Forces Command, Fort McPherson, Georgia.

The US Army Recruiting Command established the Glen E. Morrell Award for Recruiting Excellence in his honor. This medallion is the ultimate award under the Recruiting Incentive Awards Program. It includes a medallion that the recipient wears as part of their Army uniform. In addition to the medallion, a certificate for the recruiter (and the recruiter’s spouse, if applicable) will be awarded.[3]

Awards and decorations[edit]

Combat Infantry Badge.svg Combat Infantryman Badge
US Army Airborne master parachutist badge.gif Master Parachutist Badge
Brevet Parachutiste.jpg French Jump Wings
US Army Silver Recruiter Badge.png Silver Recruiter Badge
RangerTab TIoH.gif Ranger Tab
Distinguished Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Good Conduct Medal
Army of Occupation Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Vietnam Service Medal with three campaign stars
NCO Professional Education Ribbon with bronze numeral 5
Army Service Ribbon
Overseas Service Ribbon
Vietnam Campaign Medal

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://vjw1.vetjobs.com/boa.htm Board of Advisors
  2. ^ http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/u?/p15040coll2,2281 The Contributions of SGM Glen E. Morrell To the Noncommissioned Officer Corps, Nathaniel Bartee
  3. ^ http://www.usarec.army.mil/im/formpub/REC_PUBS/r672_10.pdf USAREC Regulation 672-10, Recruiting Incentive Awards

The Sergeants Major of the Army, Daniel K. Elder, Center of Military History, United States Army Washington, D.C. 2003.

Military offices
Preceded by
William A. Connelly
Sergeant Major of the Army
1983—1987
Succeeded by
Julius W. Gates