Glenesk Folk Museum

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Glenesk Folk Museum
The Retreat, Folk Museum and Tearoom, Glenesk - geograph.org.uk - 116255.jpg
Glenesk Folk Museum is located in Angus
Glenesk Folk Museum
Location within Angus
Established 1955
Location Tarfside, Angus, Scotland DD9 7YT
Coordinates 56°53′55″N 2°48′30″W / 56.8987°N 2.8083°W / 56.8987; -2.8083
Website Glenesk Retreat

Glenesk Folk Museum is a museum located in the Glen Esk valley, in Tarfside, Angus, Scotland, which is run by members of the local community.[1] It is about 9 miles (14 km) north of the village of Edzell. It is housed in a former shooting lodge, known as 'The Retreat',[2] which used to belong to the earls of Dalhousie.[3] The museum contains artefacts and documents related to the history of the surrounding area. It also has a shop selling locally-produced gifts and a tearoom. The museum organises demonstrations of local skills and crafts.

History[edit]

The Museum was established in 1955 by Greta Michie, a local schoolteacher[4] who was inspired by folk museums in Scandinavia. The building used for the museum, known as 'the Retreat', had been constructed as a retirement cottage in the 1840s by Captain J.E. Wemyss.[5][6] It was later expanded and used as a shooting lodge, and later a summer house by the earls of Dalhousie, before falling into disuse. Lord and Lady Dalhousie assisted with the establishment of the museum on this site.[5]

The museum was refurbished and expanded in 2007.[6]

Collections[edit]

The museum's artefacts are arranged thematically into rooms, including spaces covering music and costume. There are reconstructions of rooms from the 1850s, including a children's room.[7] The museum also has a document archive for genealogical research, including Census records from 1841 to 1891 and a partial record of births, marriages and deaths in the Glen and the parishes of Edzell and Lethnot.[5] This room has computers.[7]

Facilities and events[edit]

Since its foundation, the Retreat has sold locally-produced goods, and this continues in the gift shop. There is also a tearoom with home-cooked food.[5]

The Retreat also has conference facilities, a function room, a nature trail and a children's play area.

Regular craft workshops are run on-site, along with other events which have included music recitals and storytelling.[8]

 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rob Humphreys; Donald Reid (2 May 2011). The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands & Islands. Rough Guides Ltd. p. 324. ISBN 978-1-4053-8940-2. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  2. ^ Alan Murphy (1 October 2001). Scotland Highlands & Islands handbook: the travel guide. Footprint Travel Guides. pp. 169–170. ISBN 978-1-900949-94-1. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  3. ^ June Skinner Sawyers (1 August 1999). Maverick Guide to Scotland. Pelican Publishing. p. 234. ISBN 978-1-56554-227-3. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "Things to do". Glenesk Retreat and Folk Museum. Archived from the original on 28 February 2012. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Glenesk Museum". AngusGlens. Angus Council. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "FAQ". Glenesk Retreat and Folk Museum. Archived from the original on 28 February 2012. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "The Retreat Glenesk" (Leaflet). The Glenesk Trust. Archived from the original on 28 February 2012. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  8. ^ "Events". Glenesk Retreat and Folk Museum. Archived from the original on 28 February 2012. Retrieved 28 February 2012.