Glenn Keeney

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Glenn R. Keeney
GlennKeeney1971and2011.jpg
Born (1942-05-06) May 6, 1942 (age 72)
Anderson, Indiana
Residence Hot Springs Arkansas
Style Goju-ryu Karate
Teacher(s) Larry Pickle-Oknawan Goju-Ryu, L. Kim-Korean Stylist, James Wax, Robert Yarnall, Greg Helm, and Ed Erler -Shorin-ryu, Phillip Koeppel-Matsumura Seito Shorin-ryu
Rank 10th dan (degree) black belt
Website http://pkchq.com

Glenn R. Keeney is an American martial artist.[1] He was born in Anderson, Indiana in 1942, and began his karate training in 1957.

Early influences[edit]

In 1957, finding no local martial arts schools for training, he hitchhiked 115 miles from Anderson to the nearest karate school (a Shōrin-ryū dojo) in Cincinnati, Ohio[citation needed]. He later found a school in Indianapolis, but the school closed the same year it opened.

Keeney began his study of Okinawan Goju Ryu in 1964, after meeting Larry Pickel in Anderson. Pickel, a black belt under Eiichi Miyazato had studied in Okinawa while in the US Marine corp. Keeney studied under Pickel until 1967 when Jerry Brown, Glenn Keeney and Larry Davenport, the top 3 students, were offered the opportunity to purchase the school. By 1969, Keeney had become the sole owner of Komakai Academy, which he ran until 2005. Brown and Davenport stayed on at the school for many years.[citation needed]

Bill Wallace, who would later become the Professional Karate Association World Middleweight Champion, was attending Ball State University at that time. Although he chose not to adopt the Goju Ryu system, Wallace and Keeney sparred several days a week and attended over 200 tournaments together over the next 5 years. Bill Wallace credits a lot of his sparring savvy to these early workouts with Glenn Keeney.[2][3]

Competitor[edit]

Glenn Keeney, an active competitor from 1967-1975, competed in more than 300 tournaments.[4] Glenn defeated many of the nation’s best fighters such as Bill Wallace, Artis Simmons, Walt Bone, Johnny Castaldo, Woodrow Fairbanks, Parker Shelton, Ken Knudson, Flem Evans.[5][6][7][8][9] As a member of the 1971/1972 USKA World Champion Team, he traveled throughout Europe and Asia on two Good Will Tours. The 1971-72 Team went undefeated both years.[10][11] In 2012 he was inducted into "Madison County's 100 Greatest Athletes".[12] His style could best be described as cunning and wiley, a quality that earned him the nickname "The Fox".

Tournament Promoter/Entrepreneur[edit]

Keeney held his first karate tournament in 1968, and went on to host the 1970 & 1971 United States Karate Association Grand National Championships in Anderson, Indiana (the largest USKA tournament promoted to that date).[13] He was voted Best tournament promoter by the USKA 4 years running. He co-hosted the 1975 Top Ten Nationals in Anderson, Indiana with Mike Anderson of Professional Karate Magazine,[14] again with great success. In 1980, he promoted the PKA, CBS televised Bill Wallace retirement fight in Anderson, and was subsequently presented with the "Key to the City" by Mayor McMahon.[15][16] Working again with the PKA and ESPN he went on to promote the 1981/82 PKA Nationals. He continues as an active promoter, hosting the Professional Karate Commission’s International Karate Championships each year in Indianapolis, Indiana.

As an administrator, Keeney assisted in writing the USKA rule book for tournament competition. He functioned as Rules Chairman for 10 years. For several years he headed up the ratings committee for the PKA, and at the First Los Angeles World Championships in 1974 he participated as a judge.[citation needed]

Founder[edit]

Mr. Keeney founded the (PKC) Professional Karate Commission in 1986.[citation needed] It began as a sanctioning body for Full Contact Kickboxing. Upon the death of Grand Master Robert A. Trias in 1989, Keeney further developed the Professional Karate Commission as a membership organization and sanctioning body to include sport karate competition and dedicated the organization to the preservation of the principles, ethics, & integrity of Karate-Do.

Grand Master Glenn R. Keeney currently holds the rank of 10th dan, Hanshi of Okinawan Goju-ryu, and is ranked[clarification needed] in Judo and Ju-Jitsu. His devotion to karate is held in high regard by both peers and students alike. Although he is semi-retired, as of 2013 he still teaches seminars and clinics.

Notable Awards and Honors[edit]

  • Trias International Society - Inducted by Robert A. Trias, Father of American Karate[17][18]
  • Black Belt Magazine – Hall of Fame 1977, inducted as Instructor of the Year[19]
  • Black Belt Magazine – Rated #4 as a Top Ten Fighter in the U.S. 1972[20]
  • USKA #1 Rated Fighter 1972-73
  • 1980 Presented “Key to the City of Anderson” by Mayor McMahon of Anderson, Indiana
  • 2012 Inductee "Madison County's 100 Greatest Athletes" Published by Anderson Herald Bulletin

Most Noted Student[edit]

Ross Scott-Professional Karate Association (PKA) World Heavyweight Full Contact Kickboxing Champion 1977 and 1980 (defeats Joe Lewis in a non-title bout 1975)[21][22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Corcoran and Emil Farkas (1993) The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia: Traditions, History, Pioneers. Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 264, 268, 337, 392, 407 p.
  2. ^ Massad Ayoob, "The Dollar and sense of Pro Karate” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1975: 32. P.
  3. ^ John Corcoran and Emil Farkas (1993) The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia: Traditions, History, Pioneers. Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 264, 268, 337, 392, 407 p.
  4. ^ “Karate’s my Game, Keeney’s my Name” Karate Illustrated Magazine Nov 1976: 15-17. P.
  5. ^ Robert A. Trias (1980) The Pinnacle of Karate: Methods of Okinawan Shuri-ryu. Privately published, Phoenix. 336 p.
  6. ^ Joyce Yarnall, "Simmons, Keeney Clash in Midwest Karate Match” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1970: 60. P.
  7. ^ Joyce Yarnall, "Gateway Open Honors Memory of Jim Chapman” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1972: 52, 53. P
  8. ^ Jim Norris, "Annual AKA Tourney Pits Wallace vs Keeney” Black Belt Magazine Feb 1971: 53. P.
  9. ^ Joyce Yarnall, "Keeney Wins High-Scoring Bout For Spring Olympics Grand Title” Black Belt Magazine Sep 1972: 56-57. P
  10. ^ Robert A. Trias (1983) The Supreme Way: Philosophy of Karatedo. Methods of Shuri-ryu. Privately published, Phoenix, 238 p.
  11. ^ Robert A. Trias (1980) The Pinnacle of Karate: Methods of Okinawan Shuri-ryu. Privately published, Phoenix. 348 p.
  12. ^ Anderson Herald Bulletin (2012) “Madison County's 100 Greatest Athletes” Anderson Herald Bulletin: 76, 103. P.
  13. ^ Joyce Yarnall, "Bill Wallace nabs Joe Lewis at the USKK Grand Natl Championships” Black Belt Magazine Dec 1970: 30, 32. P.
  14. ^ Massad Ayoob, "The Dollar and sense of Pro Karate” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1975: 32. P.
  15. ^ Rick Kirby (1980) "Gala Summer Festival Begins" The Anderson Herald, Jun 1980 1 p.
  16. ^ 28. Bill Wallace, “Wrestling with the Kickboxing Dilemma” Black Belt Magazine Oct 1989: 12 p.
  17. ^ Robert A. Trias (1983) The Supreme Way: Philosophy of Karatedo. Methods of Shuri-ryu.
    • Privately published, Phoenix, 40 p.
  18. ^ John Corcoran and Emil Farkas (1993) The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia: Traditions History, Pioneers. Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 264, 268, 337, 392, 407 p.
  19. ^ Richard Zimmerman, "Black Belt Hall of Fame 1977” Black Belt Magazine Jan 1978: 23. Print.
  20. ^ "Top 10 Karatemen in the United States” Black Belt Magazine Oct 1972: 42. P
  21. ^ Thomas Richards (1980) "Championship bouts highlight city's first Summer Festival" Anderson Herald Newspaper June 1980 p.
  22. ^ Anderson Herald Bulletin (2012) “Madison County's 100 Greatest Athletes” Anderson Herald Bulletin: 76, 103. P.

Further reading[edit]

  • John Corcoran and Emil Farkas (1977) The Complete Martial Arts Catalogue. Simon & Schuster, 95 p.
  • John Corcoran and Emil Farkas (1993) The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia: Traditions, History, Pioneers. Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 264, 268, 337, 392, 407 p.
  • Al and David Weiss (1997) The Official History of Karate in America: The Golden Age 1968-1986. Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 28, 64, 125, 159 p.
  • Robert A. Trias (1980) The Pinnacle of Karate: Methods of Okinawan Shuri-ryu. Privately published, Phoenix. 132, 336, 348 p.
  • Robert A. Trias (1983) The Supreme Way: Philosophy of Karatedo. Methods of Shuri-ryu. Privately published, Phoenix, 40, 238 p.
  • James A. Jones (2010) The Path to Knowledge in Martial Arts. Privately published, Hazelcrest IL. 211, 215 p.
  • Richard Zimmerman, "Black Belt Hall of Fame 1977” Black Belt Magazine Jan 1978: 23. Print.
  • Joyce Yarnall, "Simmons, Keeney Clash in Midwest Karate Match” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1970: 60. P.
  • Joyce Yarnall, "Gateway Open Honors Memory of Jim Chapman” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1972: 52, 53. P.
  • Jim Norris, "Annual AKA Tourney Pits Wallace vs Keeney” Black Belt Magazine Feb 1971: 53. P.
  • Joyce Yarnall, "Artis Simmons Retires from Competition” Black Belt Magazine Dec 1970: 11. P.
  • Joyce Yarnall, "Bill Wallace nabs Joe Lewis at the USKK Grand Natl Championships” Black Belt Magazine Dec 1970: 30, 32. P.
  • "Top 10 Karatemen in the United States” Black Belt Magazine Oct 1972: 42. P.
  • Massad Ayoob, "The Dollar and sense of Pro Karate” Black Belt Magazine Apr 1975: 32. P.
  • Rick Shively, “Taking Karate to America’s Breadbasket, Glenn Keeney proved that Small town, USA is interested in the martial arts” Black Belt Magazine Dec 1976: 41-44. P.
  • Glenn Keeney, "Tales of American Karate, The Hard-Hitting Hoosier” Black Belt Magazine Jan 1993: 92. P.
  • Joyce Yarnall, "Keeney Wins High-Scoring Bout For Spring Olympics Grand Title” Black Belt Magazine Sep 1972: 56-57. P.
  • “Tourneys” Black Belt Magazine Feb 1975: 60 P.
  • Joel B. Ward / Ben Peacock, “Favorite Fighting Techniques Of Glenn Keeney” Official Karate Magazine Oct 1973: P.
  • “Karate’s my Game, Keeney’s my Name” Karate Illustrated Magazine Nov 1976: 15. P.
  • Bob Wall (2003) Who’s Who in the Martial Arts. R.A. Wall Investments, Inc: P.
  • Bill Wallace, “Wrestling with the Kickboxing Dilemma” Black Belt Magazne Oct 1989: 12 p.
  • Anderson Herald Bulletin (2012) “Madison County's 100 Greatest Athletes” Anderson Herald Bulletin: 76, 103. P.

External links[edit]