Global Health Review

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The Global Health Review (GHR) is an international non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based out of Los Angeles, California which focuses on global health issues.[1] The organization consisting primarily of the University of Southern California's Master of Public Health alumni, students, and faculty, working towards providing society with multidisciplinary approaches in program design, implementation, evaluation, research and analysis. Student chapter groups work towards interpreting, advancing, and disseminating information to their respective student communities in order to raise awareness, with hopes of translating research into practice.[2]

History[edit]

GHR was initially conceptualized in 2007 by Lawrence Ham and Brian Sandoval, then graduate students in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the University of Southern California, under the direction of Dr. Gurinder Shahi, in collaboration with MPH candidates from a required course in the Global Health Leadership track of USC's MPH program. The organization received official 501(c)(3) status in early 2008.

GHR began as an organization committed to working with academic universities to provide a platform for students to disseminate their ideas in the form of stimulating multimedia content. GHR is producing media to be disseminated through their website (currently undergoing renovation).[3] As GHR grows they aim to create a network to share resources nationwide.

GHR maintains a database, which includes: research, training, internship and practicum opportunities; cross-cultural multimedia; and local and international global health-related events. GHR's latest initiative is the Global Health Awareness Week (GHAW) in collaboration with institutional partners USC and UCLA in an effort to engage primarily students in learning about, advocating for, and sharing their passion for global health.

Today, GHR has an active student chapter at USC and is currently expanding to other Southern California universities, most immediately at UCLA.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://globalhealthtrends.org/ghr.html
  2. ^ Keck School of Medicine of USC
  3. ^ http://globalhealthtrends.org/ghr.html
  4. ^ http://www.usc.edu/schools/medicine/departments/preventive_medicine/divisions/behavior/education/mph/student_services.html

External links[edit]