Global Orgasm

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Global Orgasm was an action originally scheduled for 22 December 2006 by an author and activist couple, Donna Sheehan and Paul Reffell, to coincide with the end of solstice.[1] The idea was for participants throughout the world to have an orgasm during this one day while thinking about peace. Based on theories such as that of the noosphere and the work of the Global Consciousness Project at Princeton, there was indication that such an event would have a widespread positive effect on Human well-being.

The Second Annual Synchronized Global Orgasm for Peace occurred at 6:08 (GMT) on December 22, 2007. The time was the actual moment of the Solstice.[1]

It has since become an annual event, and with participating Orgasms permitted to fall within a 24 hour period around the actual Solstice.

In the context of Directed Orgasm as a practice and habit, the Solstice day is used to culminate the practice for the year, in solidarity with others, and then to begin again, practicing for the next year.

Global Orgasm for Peace follows in the footsteps of other mass meditation and prayer events which also claimed to be able to change the energy field of the Earth[citation needed]. The Global Orgasm for Peace is registered with the Global Consciousness Project (GCP), a project based at Princeton University, which records the output of numerous random number generators placed throughout the globe.[2]

In 2009, the project's visionaries and founders retired in order to focus on writing. They gave permission to Ani Sinclair to steward the project and website.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World Orgasm Day to Promote Peace in War-Torn Countries". Fox News Channel. December 19, 2007. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ Garofoli, Joe (November 19, 2006). "Anti-war couple conceive new way to generate peace". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 

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