Global Peace Index

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Global Peace Index Scores, 2014. Countries appearing with a deeper shade of green are ranked as more peaceful, countries appearing more red are ranked as less peaceful.
The Institute for Economics and Peace produces the Global Peace Index.

The Global Peace Index (GPI) is an attempt to measure the relative position of nations' and regions' peacefulness.[1] It is the product of the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) and developed in consultation with an international panel of peace experts from peace institutes and think tanks with data collected and collated by the Economist Intelligence Unit. The list was launched in May 2007 and updates have been made on an annual basis since then. It is claimed to be the first study to rank countries around the world according to their peacefulness. It ranks 162 countries, up from 121 in 2007. The study is the brainchild of Australian technology entrepreneur Steve Killelea, founder of Integrated Research, and is endorsed by individuals such as Kofi Annan, the Dalai Lama, archbishop Desmond Tutu, former Finnish President Martti Ahtisaari, Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus, economist Jeffrey Sachs, former president of Ireland Mary Robinson, current Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations Jan Eliasson and former US president Jimmy Carter.

The index gauges global peace using three broad themes: the level of safety and security in society, the extent of domestic and international conflict, and the degree of militarization.[2] Factors are both internal such as levels of violence and crime within the country and external such as military expenditure and wars. The GPI has been criticised[according to whom?] for not including indicators specifically relating to violence against women and children.

The updated index is released each year at events in London, Washington DC and at the United Nations Secretariat in New York. The GPI currently indicates Iceland, Denmark, Austria, and New Zealand to be the most peaceful countries and Syria, Afghanistan, South Sudan, and Iraq to be the least peaceful.[3]

Expert panel[edit]

The expert panel for the 2014 GPI consisted of:[4]

Methodology[edit]

In attempting to gauge peacefulness, the GPI investigates the extent to which countries are involved in ongoing domestic and international conflicts. It also seeks to evaluate the level of harmony or discord within a nation; ten indicators broadly assess what might be described as a safety and security in society. The assertion is that low crime rates, minimal incidences of terrorist acts and violent demonstrations, harmonious relations with neighboring countries, a stable political scene and a small proportion of the population being internally displaced or refugees can be equated with peacefulness.

Countries' peacefulness is measured on a wide range of indicators, 22 in all (originally 24 indicators, but one was dropped[which?] in 2008, and another in 2013). A table of the indicators is below.[5] In the table, UCDP stands for the Uppsala Conflict Data Program maintained by the University of Uppsala in Sweden, EIU for The Economist Intelligence Unit, UNSCT for the United Nations Survey of Criminal Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, ICPS is the International Center for Prison Studies at King's College London, IISS for the International Institute for Strategic Studies publication The Military Balance, SIPRI for the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Arms Transfers Database, and BICC for the Bonn International Center for Conversion.

#
Indicator
Source
Year(s)
Coding
1 Number of external and internal conflicts fought UCDP and EIU 2004 to 2009 Total number[6]
2 Number of deaths from organised conflict (external) UCDP 2010 Total number[6]
3 Number of deaths from organised conflict (internal) IISS 2010 Total number[6]
4 Level of organised conflict (internal) EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
5 Relations with neighbouring countries EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
6 Level of perceived criminality in society EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
7 Number of refugees and displaced persons as percentage of population UNHCR and IDMC 2009 to 2010 Refugee population by country or territory of origin, plus the number of a country's internally displaced people (IDP's) as a percentage of the country's total population
8 Political instability EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
9 Terrorist activity Global Terrorism Index and IEP 2009 Quantitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
10 Political terror scale Amnesty International and US State Department 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
11 Number of homicides per 100,000 people UNCTS and EIU 2005 to 2009 Intentional homicides, including infanticide and excluding minor road traffic and other petty offences
12 Level of violent crime EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
13 Likelihood of violent demonstrations EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5
14 Number of jailed persons per 100,000 people ICPS 2010 Rate of incarcerated persons as compared to the total population of the country
15 Number of internal security officers and police per 100,000 people UNCTS and EIU 2008 to 2010 Civil police force distinct from national guards or local militia [7]
16 Military expenditure as a percentage of GDP The Military Balance and IISS 2009 to 2010 Cash outlays of central or federal government to meet costs of national armed forces, as a percentage of GDP[8]
17 Number of armed-services personnel The Military Balance and IISS 2010 All full-time active armed-services personnel
18 Volume of transfers of major conventional weapons as recipient (imports) per 100,000 people SIPRI 2009 to 2010 Imports of major conventional weapons per 100,000 people[9]
19 Volume of transfers of major conventional weapons as supplier (exports) per 100,000 people SIPRI 2009 to 2010 Exports of major conventional weapons per 100,000 people[9]
20 Financial contribution to UN peacekeeping missions United Nations Committee on Contributions and IEP 2007 to 2010 Total number
21 Nuclear and heavy weapons capability The Military Balance, IISS, SIPRI, and IEP 2009 The Military Balance, IISS; SIPRI; and IEP[10]
22 Ease of access to small arms and light weapons EIU 2010 to 2011 Qualitative scale, ranked 1 to 5

Indicators not already ranked on a 1 to 5 scale were converted by using the following formula: x=(x-Min(x))/(Max(x)-Min(x)) where Max(x) and Min(x) are the highest and lowest values for that indicator of the countries ranked in the index. The 0 to 1 scores that resulted were then converted to the 1 to 5 scale. Individual indicators were then weighted according to the expert panel's judgment of their importance. The scores were then tabulated into two weighted sub-indices: internal peace, weighted at 60% of a country's final score, and external peace, weighted at 40% of a country's final score.[11] ‘Negative Peace’ which is defined as the absence of violence, or fear of violence is used as the definition of peace to create the Global Peace Index.[12] An additional aim of the GPI database is to facilitate deeper study of the concept of positive peace, or those attitudes, institutions, and structures that drive peacefulness in society.[12] The GPI also examines relationships between peace and reliable international measures, including democracy and transparency, education and material well-being. As such, it seeks to understand the relative importance of a range of potential determinants, or "drivers", which may influence the nurturing of peaceful societies, both internally and externally.

The main findings of the Global Peace Index are:[13]

  • Peace is correlated to indicators such as income, schooling and the level of regional integration
  • Peaceful countries often shared high levels of transparency of government and low corruption
  • Small, stable countries which are part of regional blocks are most likely to get a higher ranking.

Statistical analysis was applied to discover more specific drivers of peace. Specifically, the research team looked for indicators that were included and excluded from the index that had high levels of correlation with the overall score and rank of countries. Among the statistically significant indicators that were not used in the analysis were the functionality of a country's government, regional integration, hostility to foreigners, importance of religion in national life, corruption, freedom of the media and GDP per capita.[14]

Notably absent from the 2007 study were Belarus, Iceland, many African nations, Mongolia, North Korea, and Afghanistan. They were not included because reliable data for the 24 indicators was not available.[15] Most of these countries were included in subsequent editions of the Global Peace Index, which now ranks 162 countries worldwide.

Endorsements, criticism and response[edit]

The Index has received endorsements as a political project from a number of major international figures, including the former Secretary-General of the United Nations Kofi Annan, former President of Finland and 2008 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Martti Ahtisaari, the Dalai Lama, archbishop Desmond Tutu, Muhammad Yunus, and former United States President Jimmy Carter.[16] Steve Killelea, the Australian philanthropist who conceived the idea of the Index, argues that the Index "is a wake-up call for leaders around the globe."[17]

The Index has been widely recognized. Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University said: "The GPI continues its pioneering work in drawing the world’s attention to the massive resources we are squandering in violence and conflict. The lives and money wasted in wars, incarcerations, weapons systems, weapons trade, and more, could be directed to ending poverty, promoting education, and protecting the environment. The GPI will not only draw attention to these crucial issues, but help us understand them and to invest productively in a more peaceful world."[18]

The Economist, in publishing the first edition of the index in 2007, admitted that, "the index will run into some flak." Specifically, according to The Economist, the weighting of military expenditure "may seem to give heart to freeloaders: countries that enjoy peace precisely because others (often the USA) care for their defense." The true utility of the index may lie not in its specific rankings of countries now, but in how those rankings change over time, thus tracking when and how countries become more or less peaceful.[19]

The GPI has been criticised for not including indicators specifically relating to violence against women and children. Riane Eisler, writing in the Christian Science Monitor, argued that, "to put it mildly, this blind spot makes the index very inaccurate."[20] She mentions a number of specific cases, including Egypt, where she claims 90% of women are subject to genital mutilation and China, where, she says, "female infanticide is still a problem," according to a 2000 UNICEF study.[20]

Global Peace Index rankings[edit]

Nations considered more peaceful have lower index scores. Countries with rankings in green are in the most peaceful 20% for that year; those in red are in the bottom 20%.[21] In 2013 researchers at the Institute for Economics and Peace harmonized the Global Peace Index database to ensure that the scores were comparable over time. Several countries have been removed since 2008 due to the fact that the compilers agreed that the GPI would include nations, but not micro-states. Now, countries covered by the GPI must either have a population of more than 1 million or a land area greater than 20,000 square kilometers.[22]

Country 2014 rank[23] 2014 score[23] 2013 rank[24] 2013 score[24] 2012 rank[25][26] 2012 score[25] 2011 rank[27][26] 2011 score[27] 2010 rank[28] 2010 score[28] 2009 rank 2009 score 2008 rank 2008 score
 Iceland 1 1.189 1 1.162 1 1.113 1 1.148 2 1.212 1 1.203 1 1.107
 Denmark 2 1.193 2 1.207 2 1.239 4 1.289 7 1.341 6 1.263 5 1.238
 Austria 3 1.200 4 1.250 6 1.328 6 1.337 4 1.290 3 1.240 10 1.291
 New Zealand 4 1.236 3 1.237 2 1.239 2 1.279 1 1.188 2 1.227 2 1.190
  Switzerland 5 1.258 5 1.272 10 1.349 16 1.421 18 1.424 11 1.349 4 1.234
 Finland 6 1.297 7 1.297 9 1.348 7 1.352 9 1.352 7 1.297 7 1.273
 Canada 7 1.306 8 1.306 4 1.317 8 1.355 14 1.392 9 1.324 6 1.264
 Japan 8 1.316 6 1.293 5 1.326 3 1.287 3 1.247 4 1.243 3 1.230
 Belgium 9 1.354 10 1.339 11 1.376 14 1.413 17 1.400 13 1.365 13 1.368
 Norway 10 1.371 11 1.359 18 1.480 9 1.356 5 1.322 8 1.324 9 1.288
 Czech Republic 11 1.381 14 1.404 13 1.396 5 1.320 12 1.360 16 1.430 18 1.435
 Sweden 11 1.381 9 1.319 14 1.419 13 1.401 10 1.354 5 1.253 8 1.282
 Ireland 13 1.384 12 1.370 6 1.328 11 1.370 6 1.337 14 1.393 11 1.310
 Slovenia 14 1.398 13 1.374 8 1.330 10 1.358 11 1.358 10 1.343 13 1.370
 Australia 15 1.414 16 1.438 22 1.494 18 1.455 19 1.467 19 1.440 16 1.421
 Bhutan 16 1.422 20 1.487 19 1.481 34 1.693 36 1.665 43 1.722 19 1.440
 Germany 17 1.423 15 1.431 15 1.424 15 1.416 16 1.398 17 1.443 15 1.406
 Portugal 18 1.425 18 1.467 16 1.470 17 1.453 13 1.366 15 1.426 14 1.385
 Slovakia 19 1.467 33 1.622 26 1.590 23 1.576 21 1.536 23 1.532 25 1.533
 Netherlands 20 1.475 22 1.508 28 1.606 25 1.628 27 1.610 29 1.609 28 1.555
 Hungary 21 1.482 23 1.520 17 1.476 20 1.495 20 1.495 25 1.574 20 1.452
 Qatar 22 1.491 19 1.480 12 1.395 12 1.398 15 1.394 12 1.357 30 1.561
 Poland 23 1.532 25 1.530 24 1.524 22 1.545 29 1.618 28 1.597 33 1.610
 Mauritius 24 1.544 21 1.497 21 1.487
 Singapore 25 1.545 16 1.438 23 1.521 24 1.585 30 1.624 18 1.439 21 1.465
 Spain 26 1.548 27 1.563 25 1.548 28 1.641 25 1.588 32 1.640 27 1.550
 Croatia 26 1.548 28 1.571 35 1.648 37 1.699 41 1.707 40 1.669 52 1.760
 Taiwan 28 1.558 26 1.538 27 1.602 27 1.638 35 1.664 33 1.644 40 1.660
 Uruguay 29 1.565 24 1.528 33 1.628 21 1.521 24 1.568 24 1.573 24 1.524
 Chile 30 1.591 31 1.589 30 1.616 38 1.710 28 1.616 20 1.468 17 1.431
 Estonia 31 1.635 38 1.710 41 1.715 47 1.798 46 1.751 41 1.720 32 1.650
 Bulgaria 32 1.637 35 1.663 39 1.699 53 1.845 50 1.785 46 1.738 46 1.720
 Malaysia 33 1.659 29 1.574 20 1.590 20 1.485 22 1.539 22 1.520 23 1.517
 Italy 34 1.675 34 1.663 38 1.690 45 1.775 40 1.701 39 1.693 34 1.620
 Romania 35 1.677 30 1.584 32 1.627 40 1.742 45 1.749 26 1.580 26 1.537
 Botswana 36 1.678 32 1.598 31 1.621 35 1.695 33 1.641 31 1.634 37 1.650
 Kuwait 37 1.679 37 1.705 47 1.792 29 1.667 39 1.693 38 1.691 42 1.670
 Laos 38 1.723 39 1.724 37 1.662 32 1.687 34 1.661 49 1.767 55 1.770
 Latvia 39 1.745 41 1.772 45 1.774 46 1.793 54 1.827 50 1.774 45 1.700
 United Arab Emirates 40 1.748 36 1.679 46 1.785 33 1.690 44 1.739 30 1.619 29 1.557
 Mongolia 41 1.778 64 1.921 58 1.884 57 1.880 92 2.101 88 2.060 89 2.060
 Costa Rica 42 1.755 40 1.755 36 1.659 31 1.681 26 1.590 27 1.595 31 1.570
 Argentina 43 1.789 60 1.907 44 1.763 55 1.852 71 1.962 61 1.846 55 1.770
 Zambia 44 1.791 48 1.832 51 1.830 52 1.833 51 1.813 58 1.824 52 1.760
 Vietnam 45 1.792 41 1.772 34 1.641 30 1.670 38 1.691 48 1.764 42 1.730
 Lithuania 46 1.797 43 1.784 43 1.741 43 1.760 42 1.713 36 1.675 48 1.670
 United Kingdom 47 1.798 44 1.787 29 1.609 26 1.631 31 1.631 41 1.710 48 1.740
 France 48 1.808 53 1.863 40 1.710 36 1.697 32 1.636 52 1.779 50 1.750
 Namibia 48 1.808 46 1.807 49 1.804 54 1.850 59 1.864 59 1.837 60 1.820
 Lesotho 50 1.839 50 1.840 53 1.864
 Cyprus 51 1.844 49 1.840 73 1.957 71 2.013 76 2.013 34 1.64 37 1.650
 South Korea 52 1.849 47 1.822 42 1.734 50 1.829 43 1.715 42 1.716 40 1.660
 Serbia 52 1.849 62 1.912 64 1.920 84 2.071 90 2.071 71 1.906 80 2.020
 Indonesia 54 1.853 54 1.879 63 1.913 68 1.979 67 1.946 60 1.843 64 1.860
 Montenegro 55 1.860 73 1.976 81 2.006 89 2.113 88 2.060 80 2.005
 Jordan 56 1.861 52 1.858 62 1.905 64 1.918 68 1.948 67 1.864 61 1.830
 Panama 57 1.877 56 1.893 61 1.899 49 1.812 61 1.878 66 1.862 43 1.680
 Nicaragua 58 1.882 66 1.931 81 2.006 72 2.021 64 1.924 72 1.911 71 1.910
 Oman 59 1.889 45 1.806 59 1.887 41 1.743 23 1.561 21 1.438 22 1.467
 Tanzania 59 1.889 55 1.887 55 1.873 56 1.858 55 1.832 53 1.782 56 1.790
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 61 1.902 71 1.967 65 1.923 60 1.893 60 1.873 45 1.735 69 1.900
 Ghana 61 1.902 58 1.899 50 1.807 42 1.752 48 1.781 55 1.795 55 1.770
 Morocco 63 1.915 57 1.897 54 1.867 58 1.887 58 1.861 63 1.856 60 1.820
 Kosovo 64 1.929 72 1.969
 Albania 65 1.939 69 1.961 66 1.927 63 1.912 65 1.925 70 1.890 71 1.910
 Madagascar 66 1.942 90 2.074 99 2.124 105 2.239 77 2.019 69 1.886 35 1.630
 Sierra Leone 66 1.942 59 1.904 52 1.855 61 1.904 53 1.818
 Gabon 68 1.945 76 1.995 75 1.972 81 2.059 74 1.981 44 1.730 50 1.750
 Timor-Leste 69 1.947 51 1.854
 Bolivia 70 1.969 86 2.062 84 2.021 76 2.045 81 2.037 82 2.041 76 1.960
 Moldova 71 1.971 74 1.984 66 1.927 59 1.892 66 1.938 74 1.965 78 2.000
 Senegal 72 1.974 85 2.061 78 1.994 77 2.047 79 2.031 75 1.969 74 1.950
 Paraguay 73 1.976 84 2.060 76 1.973 66 1.954 77 2.019 73 1.950 69 1.900
 Djibouti 74 1.979 63 1.917 56 1.881
 Cuba 75 1.986 65 1.922 70 1.951 67 1.964 72 1.964 64 1.858 64 1.860
   Nepal 76 1.989 82 2.058 80 2.001 95 2.152 82 2.044 76 1.967
 Malawi 77 1.995 74 1.984 60 1.894 39 1.740 51 1.813 51 1.776 62 1.840
 Burkina Faso 78 1.998 87 2.064 56 1.881 51 1.832 57 1.852 65 1.860 72 1.930
 Tunisia 79 2.001 77 2.005 72 1.955 44 1.765 37 1.678 37 1.686 40 1.660
 Saudi Arabia 80 2.003 97 2.119 106 2.178 101 2.192 107 2.216 108 2.251 105 2.250
 Togo 80 2.003 67 1.954
 Mozambique 82 2.004 61 1.910 48 1.796 48 1.809 47 1.779 47 1.762 45 1.700
 Guyana 83 2.013 70 1.962 69 1.937 88 2.112 91 2.095 94 2.082
 Liberia 84 2.014 80 2.048 101 2.131 96 2.159 99 2.148
 Ecuador 85 2.042 83 2.059 85 2.028 90 2.116 101 2.185 105 2.197 100 2.170
 Greece 86 2.052 68 1.957 77 1.976 65 1.947 62 1.887 62 1.850 58 1.810
 Macedonia 87 2.056 79 2.044 68 1.935 78 2.048 83 2.048 86 2.052 76 1.960
 Swaziland 87 2.056 88 2.069 85 2.028 69 1.995 73 1.966
 Trinidad and Tobago 89 2.065 90 2.074 94 2.082 79 2.051 94 2.107 77 1.985 89 2.060
 Papua New Guinea 90 2.066 99 2.126 93 2.076 94 2.139 95 2.113 91 2.075 96 2.130
 Brazil 91 2.073 81 2.051 83 2.017 74 2.040 83 2.048 87 2.058 93 2.100
 Belarus 92 2.078 96 2.117 109 2.208 112 2.283 105 2.204 85 2.046 89 2.060
 Equatorial Guinea 93 2.079 89 2.072 87 2.039 75 2.041 68 1.948 56 1.808 69 1.900
 Gambia 94 2.085 93 2.091 74 1.961 62 1.910 63 1.890
 Dominican Republic 95 2.093 94 2.103 90 2.068 91 2.125 93 2.103 79 2.004 83 2.040
 Turkmenistan 95 2.093 103 2.154 117 2.242 108 2.248 117 2.295 90 2.075 97 2.160
 Armenia 97 2.097 98 2.123 115 2.238 109 2.260 113 2.266
 Bangladesh 98 2.106 105 2.159 91 2.071 83 2.070 87 2.058 93 2.082 93 2.100
 Haiti 99 2.127 92 2.075 107 2.179 113 2.288 114 2.270 120 2.406 114 2.350
 Benin 100 2.129 104 2.156 114 2.231
 United States of America 101 2.137 100 2.126 88 2.058 82 2.063 85 2.056 104 2.195 100
 Angola 102 2.143 102 2.148 95 2.105 87 2.109 86 2.057 84 2.045 100 2.170
 Kazakhstan 103 2.150 78 2.031 105 2.151 93 2.137 95 2.113 97 2.141 82 2.030
 Uzbekistan 104 2.179 124 2.333 110 2.219 109 2.260 110 2.242 109 2.274 113 2.325
 Sri Lanka 105 2.197 110 2.230 103 2.145 126 2.407 133 2.621 126 2.571 120 2.450
 Cambodia 106 2.201 115 2.263 108 2.207 115 2.301 111 2.252 101 2.178 95 2.120
 Jamaica 107 2.203 117 2.274 113 2.222 106 2.244 98 2.138 89 2.065 89 2.060
 People's Republic of China 108 2.207 101 2.142 89 2.061 80 2.054 80 2.034 83 2.045 82 2.030
 Republic of the Congo 109 2.211 107 2.183 104 2.148 98 2.165 102 2.192 99 2.161 101 2.180
 Uganda 110 2.221 106 2.180 98 2.121 96 2.159 100 2.165 103 2.188 110 2.300
 Bahrain 111 2.225 95 2.109 118 2.247 123 2.398 70 1.956 57 1.815 57 1.800
 Georgia 111 2.225 139 2.511 141 2.541 134 2.558 142 2.970 134 2.842
 Cameroon 113 2.235 108 2.191 97 2.113 86 2.104 106 2.210 95 2.111 93 2.100
 Algeria 114 2.239 119 2.284 121 2.255 129 2.423 116 2.277 110 2.276 108 2.290
 Guatemala 115 2.248 109 2.221 124 2.287 125 2.405 112 2.258 102 2.187 102 2.210
 El Salvador 116 2.280 112 2.240 111 2.220 102 2.215 103 2.195 92 2.080 93 2.100
 Honduras 117 2.281 123 2.332 129 2.339 117 2.327 125 2.395 116 2.379 116 2.370
 Guinea 118 2.296 116 2.272 92 2.073 92 2.126
 Peru 119 2.304 114 2.258 79 1.995 85 2.077 89 2.067 78 2.000 89 2.060
 Mauritania 120 2.350 122 2.326 125 2.301 130 2.425 123 2.389 117 2.388 105 2.250
 Niger 121 2.351 127 2.362 116 2.241 119 2.356
 South Africa 122 2.364 121 2.292 127 2.321 118 121 2.380 112 2.317 95 2.120
 Azerbaijan 123 2.365 126 2.350 132 2.360 122 2.379 119 2.367 114 2.342 108 2.290
 Eritrea 124 2.377 120 2.288 122 2.264 104 2.227
 Kyrgyzstan 125 2.382 131 2.391 131 2.359 114 2.296
 Thailand 126 2.395 130 2.378 126 2.303 107 2.247 124 2.393 119 2.399 111 2.324
 Tajikistan 126 2.395 118 2.282 99 2.124 103 2.225
 Turkey 128 2.402 134 2.437 130 2.344 127 2.411 126 2.420 124 2.538 119 2.430
 Venezuela 129 2.410 128 2.370 123 2.278 124 2.403 122 2.387 115 2.348 103 2.240
 Burundi 130 2.418 144 2.593 138 2.524 132 2.532 131 2.577 123 2.536
 Iran 131 2.437 137 2.473 128 2.324 119 2.356 104 2.202 106 2.241 106 2.241
 Kenya 132 2.452 136 2.466 120 2.252 111 2.276 120 2.369 111 2.297 118 2.380
 Libya 133 2.453 145 2.604 147 2.830 143 2.816 56 1.839 54 1.790 65 1.870
 Philippines 134 2.456 129 2.374 133 2.415 136 2.574 130 2.574 118 2.397 116 2.370
 Mali 135 2.465 125 2.346 102 2.132 100 2.188 109 2.240 107 2.250 108 2.290
 Myanmar 136 2.473 140 2.528 139 2.525 133 2.538 132 2.580 122 2.495 124 2.540
 Rwanda 137 2.494 135 2.444 119 2.250 99 2.185 75 2.012 81 2.025 66 1.870
 Mexico 138 2.500 133 2.434 135 2.445 121 2.362 107 2.216 98 2.158 89 2.060
 Ethiopia 139 2.502 146 2.630 137 2.504 131 2.468 127 2.444 130 2.635 126 2.460
 Cote d'Ivoire 140 2.546 151 2.732 134 2.419 128 2.417 118 2.297 113 2.320 109 2.300
 Ukraine 141 2.546 111 2.238 71 1.953 69 1.995 97 2.115 100 2.166 80 2.020
 Chad 142 2.558 138 2.493 145 2.671 141 2.740 141 2.964 135 2.959 134 2.970
 Egypt 143 2.571 113 2.258 111 2.220 73 2.023 49 1.784 68 1.872 74 1.950
 India 144 2.571 141 2.570 142 2.549 135 2.570 128 2.516 125 2.554 123 2.490
 Guinea-Bissau 145 2.591 132 2.431 95 2.105
 Lebanon 146 2.620 142 2.575 136 2.459 137 2.597 134 2.639 128 2.606 127 2.670
 Yemen 147 2.629 152 2.747 143 2.601 138 2.670 129 2.573 121 2.416 111 2.324
 Zimbabwe 148 2.662 149 2.696 140 2.538 140 2.722 135 2.678 131 2.700 134 2.380
 Israel 149 2.689 150 2.730 150 2.842 145 2.901 149 3.019 137 3.012 134 2.970
 Colombia 150 2.701 147 2.634 144 2.625 139 2.700 138 2.787 129 2.625 125 2.610
 Nigeria 151 2.710 148 2.693 146 2.801 142 2.743 137 2.756 127 2.599 118 2.570
 Russia 152 3.039 155 3.060 153 2.938 147 2.966 143 3.013 138 3.064 131 2.870
 North Korea 153 3.071 154 3.044 152 2.932 149 3.092 139 2.855 133 2.771 129 2.750
 Pakistan 154 3.107 157 3.106 149 2.833 146 2.905 145 3.050 140 3.087 132 2.890
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 155 3.213 156 3.085 154 3.073 148 3.016 140 2.925 136 2.988 128 2.690
 Central African Republic 156 3.331 153 3.031 151 2.872 144 2.869 136 2.753 132 2.706 130 2.810
 Sudan 157 3.362 158 3.242 156 3.193 151 3.223 146 3.125 139 3.086 136 3.150
 Somalia 158 3.368 161 3.394 158 3.392 153 3.379 148 3.390 141 3.269 137 3.320
 Iraq 159 3.377 159 3.245 155 3.192 152 3.296 149 3.406 143 3.370 138 3.370
 South Sudan 160 3.397 143 2.576
 Afghanistan 161 3.416 162 3.440 157 3.252 150 3.212 147 3.252 142 3.358 135 3.000
 Syria 162 3.650 160 3.393 147 2.830 116 2.322 115 2.274 96 2.112 77 1.990
Note: There have been changes to the methodology for the 2013 data.[29]

2014 Global Peace Index full table[edit]

The following table contains all the indicators analysed by 2014 GPI.

Notes: Click on show to see it. Pass the mouse pointer over each column header to see a short explanation about the codes.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Global Peace Index". http://economicsandpeace.org. 
  2. ^ Information about indicators and methodology "2014 Global Peace Index" (PDF). Institute for Economics and Peace. Retrieved 2015-06-02. 
  3. ^ GPI Map "2014 Global Peace Index". Institute for Economics and Peace. Retrieved 2015-06-04. 
  4. ^ As listed in "2013 Global Peace Index" (PDF). Institute for Economics and Peace. Retrieved 2013-06-24. 
  5. ^ Information about indicators and methodology "2013 Global Peace Index" (PDF). Institute for Economics and Peace. Retrieved 2013-06-24. 
  6. ^ a b c In this case, a conflict is defined as, "a contested incompatibility that concerns government and/or territory where the use of armed force between two parties, of which at least one is the government of a state, results in at least 25 battle-related deaths in a year."
  7. ^ Excludes militia and national guard forces.
  8. ^ This includes, "cash outlays of central or federal government to meet the costs of national armed forces—including strategic, land, naval, air, command, administration and support forces as well as paramilitary forces, customs forces and border guards if these are trained and equipped as a military force."
  9. ^ a b This includes transfers, purchases, or gifts of aircraft, armoured vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, ships, engines
  10. ^ rates the destructive capability of a country's stock of heavy weapons via a categorised system. As of 2013, countries with nuclear capabilities receive a score of five, the highest possible score
  11. ^ "Global Peace Index Report, Methodology, pg. 51-54" (PDF). Vision of Humanity. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 
  12. ^ a b Global Peace Index (http:/ / www. visionofhumanity. org/ pdf/ gpi/ 2013_Global_Peace_Index_Report. pdf) - Methodology and Data Sources
  13. ^ First Global Peace Index Ranks 121 Countries, PP Newswire
  14. ^ "Global Peace Index: Drivers of Peace" (PDF). Vision of Humanity. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 
  15. ^ Charles, Deborah (May 30, 2007). "New Peace Index Ranks US Among Worst Nations". Reuters. Retrieved 2007-08-09. 
  16. ^ "Endorsers for GPI" (PDF). Vision of Humanity. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 
  17. ^ "Norway rated most peaceful nation". BBC News. 2007-05-30. Retrieved 2009-06-22. 
  18. ^ "World-less peaceful in 2010 report". PR Newswire. Retrieved 2010-06-15. 
  19. ^ "Give peace a rating". The Economist. May 31, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-09. 
  20. ^ a b Eisler, Riane (July 26, 2007). "Dark underbelly of the world's most 'peaceful' countries". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 2007-08-09. 
  21. ^ All information in the table of rankings from: "About the Global Peace Index". Vision of Humanity. Retrieved 6 August 2013. 
  22. ^ page 12, Global Peace Index 2012.pdf http://economicsandpeace.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/2012-Global-Peace-Index-Report.pdf
  23. ^ a b Institute for Economics and Peace (2014). Global Peace Index 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2015
  24. ^ a b Institute for Economics and Peace (2013). Global Peace Index 2013. Retrieved 16 July 2015
  25. ^ a b Institute for Economics and Peace (2012). Global Peace Index 2012 at the Wayback Machine (archived July 2, 2014)
  26. ^ a b The Guardian (2012). Global peace index 2012: the full list. Retrieved 16 July 2015.
  27. ^ a b Institute for Economics and Peace (2011). Global Peace Index 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2015
  28. ^ a b Institute for Economics and Peace (2010). Global Peace Index 2010. Retrieved 16 July 2015
  29. ^ Global Peace Index - Methodology and Data Sources

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