Gloria Blondell

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Gloria Blondell
Gloria Blondell.jpg
Blondell as Honeybee Willis (The Life of Riley)
Born (1910-08-16)August 16, 1910
Manhattan, New York City, U.S.
Died March 25, 1986(1986-03-25) (aged 75)
Santa Monica, California, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 1938–1962
Spouse(s) Albert Broccoli (1940–1945; divorced)
Victor Hunter (1962–1980; his death)

Gloria Blondell (August 16, 1910 – March 25, 1986) was an actress and voice actor between 1938 and 1962, and was the younger sister of Joan Blondell.[1]

Family[edit]

Blondell came from a family of entertainers. She once said, "[S]ome member of my family has been in the theater ever since the time of Richard the Lionhearted."[2] Her father, Ed Blondell, was an actor for 80 years.[2]

Stage[edit]

Blondell said that she first went on stage when she was 9 months old, and she was described as "a trouper at three [years of age]."[2] Her family comprised a vaudeville troupe, the "Bouncing Blondells", whose members were her parents, her sister and her brother.[3]

In 1935, Gloria appeared in the Broadway production of Three Men on a Horse at the Playhouse in New York City.[citation needed]

Radio[edit]

Blondell had the role of secretary Jerry Booker on I Love a Mystery.[4]

Television[edit]

She may be best remembered for her role as Honeybee Gillis in the 1950s era sitcom, The Life of Riley. She appeared as enviably curvaceous Grace Foster in the I Love Lucy episode, "The Anniversary Present" (1952).[5]

She portrayed an aging prostitute who rescues a town from a trio of criminals in "The Looters", an episode of Wanted Dead or Alive. For Daisy Duck's second appearance as a Disney cartoon character, she took over, marking the debut of Daisy's "normal" voice. Blondell would voice Daisy for six of her nine speaking appearances during the classic shorts era.[5]

Film[edit]

Blondell co-starred with Ronald Reagan in Accidents Will Happen (1938)[6] and with Hans Conried in The Twonky (1953).[7] She was also in The Daredevil Drivers (1938).[8]

Personal life[edit]

She married film producer on Albert Broccoli July 26, 1940; they divorced August 7, 1945.[9] She married, secondly, to advertising man Vic Hunter on September 14, 1946, in Monterey, California.[10] She married, thirdly, to Victor Hunter from 1962 to 1980.[5]

Death[edit]

She died at age 75 in 1986 in Santa Monica, California from cancer and was interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, Glendale, California.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gloria Blondell at Find a Grave
  2. ^ a b c Belser, Emily (February 2, 1956). "Gloria Blondell Finding Sister's Shadow A Burden". Corsicana Daily Sun. p. 19. 
  3. ^ Rathbun, Joe (December 10, 1944). "Joe's Radio Parade". Sunday Times Signal. p. 23. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  4. ^ Clark, Ethel (April 5, 1942). "Ethel Clark's Radio Flashes". The Ogden Standard-Examiner. p. 35. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  5. ^ a b c Gloria Blondell at the Internet Movie Database
  6. ^ "Theater Calendar". The Decatur Daily Review. April 24, 1938. p. 20. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  7. ^ "The Movie Reporter Speaks". The Hearne Democrat. October 16, 1953. p. 15. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  8. ^ "Joan Blondell's Sister in Film". Harrisburg Telegraph. April 30, 1938. p. 8. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  9. ^ "Gloria Blondell Granted Divorce". Kingsport News. August 8, 1945. p. 3. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  10. ^ "Gloria Blondell Wed To Advertising Man". The San Bernardino County Sun. September 15, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved May 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read

External links[edit]