Gloucester Township, New Jersey

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"Gloucester Township" redirects here. For the community in Ontario, see Gloucester Township, Ontario.
Gloucester Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Gloucester
Motto: "A great place to live, work and play."
Gloucester Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Gloucester Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Gloucester Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Gloucester Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°47′32″N 75°02′10″W / 39.792186°N 75.036059°W / 39.792186; -75.036059Coordinates: 39°47′32″N 75°02′10″W / 39.792186°N 75.036059°W / 39.792186; -75.036059[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Formed June 1, 1695
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Gloucester, England
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor David R. Mayer (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Tom Cardis[4]
 • Clerk Rosemary DiJosie[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 23.260 sq mi (60.245 km2)
 • Land 22.983 sq mi (59.526 km2)
 • Water 0.277 sq mi (0.718 km2)  1.19%
Area rank 119th of 566 in state
4th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 118 ft (36 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 64,634
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 64,297
 • Rank 19th of 566 in state
3rd of 37 in county[13]
 • Density 2,812.2/sq mi (1,085.8/km2)
 • Density rank 224th of 566 in state
25th of 37 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08012[14]
Area code(s) 856[15]
FIPS code 3400726760[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882154[18]
Website www.glotwp.com

Gloucester Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 64,634,[8][10][11] reflecting an increase of 284 (+0.4%) from the 64,350 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 10,553 (+19.6%) from the 53,797 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The township ranked as the 19th most-populous municipality in the state in 2010 after having been ranked 18th in 2000.[9]

Gloucester Township was formed on June 1, 1695, while the area was still part of Gloucester County, and was incorporated as one of New Jersey's first 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. It became part of the newly created Camden County on March 13, 1844. Portions of the township have been taken over the years to form Union Township (November 15, 1831), Winslow Township (March 8, 1845) and Clementon Township (February 24, 1903).[20]

Blackwood (with a 2010 Census population of 4,545[21]) and Glendora (4,750 in 2010[22]) are census-designated places located within the township.[23] Blenheim, Chews Landing and Erial are unincorporated communities located within the township.[24]

Geography[edit]

Gloucester Township is located at 39°47′32″N 75°02′10″W / 39.792186°N 75.036059°W / 39.792186; -75.036059 (39.792186,-75.036059). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 23.260 square miles (60.245 km2), of which, 22.983 square miles (59.526 km2) of it was land and 0.277 square miles (0.718 km2) of it (1.19%) was water.[1][2]

Big Timber Creek flows East to West through the township to the Delaware River.

The township borders Hi-Nella, Lindenwold, Magnolia, Pine Hill, Runnemede, Somerdale, Stratford, and Winslow Township. Gloucester Township also borders Gloucester County.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 1,398
1810 1,726 23.5%
1820 2,059 19.3%
1830 2,332 13.3%
1840 2,837 * 21.7%
1850 2,371 * −16.4%
1860 2,320 −2.2%
1870 2,710 16.8%
1880 2,527 −6.8%
1890 3,091 22.3%
1900 4,018 30.0%
1910 2,380 * −40.8%
1920 3,097 30.1%
1930 5,820 87.9%
1940 6,198 6.5%
1950 7,952 28.3%
1960 17,591 121.2%
1970 26,511 50.7%
1980 45,156 70.3%
1990 53,797 19.1%
2000 64,350 19.6%
2010 64,634 0.4%
Est. 2013 64,297 [12] −0.5%
Population sources:
1800-1840[25] 1850-2000[26]
1800-1920[27] 1840[28] 1850-1870[29]
1850[30] 1870[31] 1880-1890[32]
1890-1910[33] 1910-1930[34]
1930-1990[35] 2000[36][37] 2010[8][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 64,634 people, 23,566 households, and 16,873 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,812.2 per square mile (1,085.8/km2). There were 24,711 housing units at an average density of 1,075.2 per square mile (415.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 75.80% (48,993) White, 16.19% (10,464) Black or African American, 0.20% (129) Native American, 3.67% (2,374) Asian, 0.03% (20) Pacific Islander, 1.83% (1,183) from other races, and 2.28% (1,471) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.65% (3,650) of the population.[8]

There were 23,566 households, of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.4% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.24.[8]

In the township, 24.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.8 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,811 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,131) and the median family income was $82,491 (+/- $2,354). Males had a median income of $55,185 (+/- $1,931) versus $41,697 (+/- $1,505) for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,231 (+/- $984). About 3.5% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.0% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.[38]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] of 2000, there were 64,350 people, 23,150 households, and 16,876 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,771.2 people per square mile (1,070.0/km²). There were 24,257 housing units at an average density of 1,044.6 per square mile (403.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 83.11% White, 11.55% African American, 0.16% Native American, 2.62% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.11% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.05% of the population.[36][37]

There were 23,150 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.24.[36][37]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.9% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the township was $54,280, and the median income for a family was $62,992. Males had a median income of $42,451 versus $31,427 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,604. About 4.4% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

History[edit]

The present Township of Gloucester was one of the original townships that comprised old Gloucester County. It became the county's first political subdivision in 1685. The boundaries Gloucester County extended from the Delaware River to the Atlantic Ocean until 1683, when it was divided into two townships; Egg Harbor Township and Gloucester Township, which took its name from the cathedral city of Gloucester on the banks of the River Severn in England. Gloucester Township further subdivided into four smaller townships, and on June 1, 1695, became one of the first New Jersey municipalities to incorporate. In 1844, the township became part of the newly formed County of Camden

The Gabreil Daveis Tavern House, located at 4th Avenue in Glendora, is a pre-American Revolutionary War tavern that was built in 1756 and for many years served as an inn for boatmen who transported their products to Philadelphia via nearby Big Timber Creek. It was recently restored and now serves as Gloucester Township's historical centerpiece. This building has also been referred to as The Hillman Hospital House because it was designated a hospital by George Washington during the Revolution.[39] It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is open to visitors on Sunday afternoons from April through December, excepting holidays.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Gloucester Township is governed within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Mayor-Council system of New Jersey municipal government plan B, as implemented as of July 1, 1982, based on direct petition.[40] The township is governed by a mayor and a seven-member township council, all of whom are elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections to serve four-year terms of office. Either three or four council seats come up for election in odd-numbered years, with the mayoral seat up for vote the same year that three council seats are up for vote.[6] The Township has a full-time Mayor and a seven-member council.

As of 2014, the Mayor of Gloucester Township is Democrat David R. Mayer, whose term of office ends December 31, 2017. Members of the Township Council are Council President Glen Bianchini (D, 2015), Council Vice President Orlando Mercado (D, 2015), Dan Hutchison (D, 2017), Franklin Schmidt (D, 2017), Samuel M. Siler (D, 2015), Tracey Trotto (D, 2015) and Michelle L. Winters (D, 2017).[41][42][43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Gloucester Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district.[10][45][46]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

The 4th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with wither two or three seats coming up for election each year.[55] As of 2014, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[56], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2016)[57], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[58], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[59], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[60], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[61] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016).[62][63][64] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[65] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[66] and Surrogate Patricia Egan "Pat" Jones.[67]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 41,873 registered voters in Gloucester Township, of which 16,603 (39.7%) were registered as Democrats, 6,039 (14.4%) were registered as Republicans and 19,205 (45.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 26 voters registered to other parties.[68]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 61.3% of the vote here (18,601 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 35.1% (10,645 votes), with 30,341 ballots cast among the township's 40,565 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.8%.[69] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.6% of the vote here (16,318 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 40.7% (11,529 votes), with 28,323 ballots cast among the township's 38,229 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.1.[70]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 47.9% of the vote here (8,390 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 44.2% (7,748 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.8% (839 votes), with 17,519 ballots cast among the township's 41,329 registered voters, yielding a 42.4% turnout.[71]

Education[edit]

The Gloucester Township Public Schools system, serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade at eight elementary schools (grades K-5) and three middle schools (grades 6-8). As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's 11 schools had an enrollment of 7,017 students and 514.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.65:1.[72]

Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[73]) are eight elementary schools — Blackwood Elementary School[74] (610 students; in grades PreK-5), Chews Elementary School[75] (750; K-5), Erial Elementary School[76] (750; PreK-5), Glendora Elementary School[77] (285; K-5), Gloucester Township Elementary School[78] (274; K-5), James W. Lilley Elementary School[79] (515; K-5), Loring-Flemming Elementary School[80] (755; PreK-5) and Union Valley Elementary School[81] (550; K-5) — along with Glen Landing Middle School[82] (812), Charles W. Lewis Middle School[83] (660) and Ann A. Mullen Middle School[84] (1,056) for grades 6-8.[85]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend one of the three high schools that are part of the Black Horse Pike Regional School District. The schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[86]) are Highland Regional High School[87] (1,140 students; located in Blackwood), Timber Creek Regional High School[88] (1,407; Erial) or Triton Regional High School[89] (1,503; Runnemede). Students from Gloucester Township attend one of the three schools based on their residence. Students from the other two communities in the district — Bellmawr and Runnemede — all attend Triton High School.[90]

Also available in the Township is the Gloucester Township Technical High School, which offers day and evening classes.[91]

The Kingdom Charter School of Leadership is a charter school that serves students in Kindergarten through sixth grade residing in Gloucester Township, who are accepted by lottery on a space-available basis.[92]

Our Lady of Hope Regional School is an elementary school that operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden, having been created in 2008 through the merger of St. Agnes School and St. Jude's Regional School.[93][94]

Camden County College is located in Blackwood, on a 320 acres (130 ha) campus that had been acquired in 1967. The school's first students started attending in 1968 and the campus has undergone an $83 million expansion and renovation project that started in 2005. Over 44 programs of study ranging from allied health to engineering technology and science, laser and optics, public safety, business administration, liberal arts, human services and secretarial studies are available. Other programs include a GED center, self-enrichment and senior adult courses. Evening and weekend classes, including computer programming are offered. Local residents may use the college's learning resource center to receive dental hygiene clinic services.[95]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 239.44 miles (385.34 km) of roadways, of which 186.25 miles (299.74 km) were maintained by the municipality, 41.69 miles (67.09 km) by Camden County, 9.10 miles (14.65 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.40 miles (3.86 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[96]

CR 534 travels through the center while CR 544 runs along the northern border. Route 41 clips the northwestern tip very briefly while Route 42 (the North-South Freeway) and Route 168 both pass through the township in the western part. The Atlantic City Expressway passes through in the southwestern area.[97]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service between the township and Philadelphia is provided on the 400 and 403 routes, with local service available on the 459 routes.[98][99]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Gloucester Township include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Departments, Gloucester Township. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Gloucester Township. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Gloucester, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Gloucester township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  9. ^ a b The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Gloucester township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Blackwood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 9, 2011.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Blackwood, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 4, 2012.
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  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 105. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Blackwood CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Glendora CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  23. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  24. ^ Home page, Gloucester Township. Accessed September 9, 2011. "Communities of Gloucester Township include parts of Blackwood, Glendora, Erial, Sicklerville, Blenheim, Lambs Terrace, Chews Landing, and Hilltop."
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
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  28. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  29. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 279, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 14, 2013. "Gloucester township had a population in 1850 of 2,371; in 1860, 2,320; and in 1870, 2,710."
  30. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  31. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  32. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 14, 2013.
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  35. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed October 4, 2012.
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  38. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Gloucester township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  39. ^ Burkhart, Michael T. "Tavern welcomed water travelers", Courier-Post, November 1, 2007. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  40. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  41. ^ Elected Officials, Gloucester Township. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  42. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Gloucester Township. Accessed July 25, 2014.
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  48. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  50. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  56. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  60. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  61. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  62. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  63. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  64. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  65. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  66. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  68. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  69. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  70. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  71. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  72. ^ District information for Gloucester Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  73. ^ Data for the Gloucester Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  74. ^ Blackwood Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  75. ^ Chews Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  76. ^ Erial Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  77. ^ Glendora Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  78. ^ Gloucester Township Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  79. ^ James W. Lilley Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  80. ^ Loring-Flemming Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  81. ^ Union Valley Elementary School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  82. ^ Glen Landing Middle School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  83. ^ Charles W. Lewis Middle School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  84. ^ Ann A. Mullen Middle School, Gloucester Township Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  85. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Gloucester Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  86. ^ School Data for the Black Horse Pike Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  87. ^ Highland Regional High School, Black Horse Pike Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  88. ^ Timber Creek Regional High School, Black Horse Pike Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  89. ^ Triton Regional High School, Black Horse Pike Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  90. ^ Triton Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 4, 2014. "Triton Regional is a community based high school and we value the support of our parents, community members and local businesses. Our students and staff are ambassadors of Runnemede, Bellmawr, and Gloucester Township and carry that honor with Mustang pride and responsibility."
  91. ^ Gloucester Township Technical High School, Camden County Technical Schools. Accessed July 20, 2008.
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