Go Bo Diddley

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Go Bo Diddley
Studio album by Bo Diddley
Released July 1959 (1959-07)[1]
Recorded March 2, 1955 – September 1958 in Chicago, Illinois[2][3]
Genre Rock and roll, rhythm and blues
Length 30:57
Label Checker
Producer Leonard Chess, Phil Chess, Bo Diddley
Bo Diddley chronology
Bo Diddley
(1958)
Go Bo Diddley
(1959)
Have Guitar Will Travel
(1960)
Singles from Go Bo Diddley
  1. "I'm Sorry"
    Released: February 1959 (1959-02)[4]
  2. "Crackin' Up"
    Released: May 1959 (1959-05)[5]
  3. "Say Man"
    Released: August 1959 (1959-08)[6]

Go Bo Diddley is the second LP record by rock and roll pioneer Bo Diddley released in July 1959.[1] The album was Bo's first studio album and his first LP for Checker Records. The album was ranked #214 on The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine.[7]

Background[edit]

The b-side to the single "Hush Your Mouth", "Dearest Darling" was released June 1958 and also released on Bo Diddley's self-titled debut album. Bo's next single "Willie and Lillie" was released in November 1958 and then released on this album. Bo's next single "I'm Sorry"/"Oh Yea" was released in February 1959[4] and reached #17 on Billboard magazine's Hot R&B Sides chart.[8] The next single "Crackin' Up" b/w "The Great Grandfather" was released in May.[5] Go Bo Diddley was released two months later in July.[1] In November 1959 Bo released his most popular single "Say Man"/"The Clock Strikes Twelve" which became a crossover hit making #20 on the Billboard Hot 100. The rest of the songs on the album were album-only tracks, including "You Don't Love Me (You Don't Care)" which Little Walter retitled as "Roller Coaster" and released as a single,[9] and is featured on the Bo Diddley compilation album His Best even though it is an album track not a single.

Recording[edit]

The original recordings in mono format where recorded with an Ampex-350 tape recorder.[10] The songs "You Don't Love Me (You Don't Care"[2] and "Little Girl" were from Bo's first session for Chess Records on March 2, 1955.[3]

Track listing[edit]

All songs were written by Ellas McDaniel, with "I'm Sorry" made in collaboration with Alan Freed and Harvey Fuqua.[10]

Side one
  1. "Crackin' Up" – 2:41
  2. "I'm Sorry" – 2:30
  3. "Bo's Guitar" – 2:38
  4. "Willie and Lillie" – 2:34
  5. "You Don't Love Me (You Don't Care)" – 2:36
  6. "Say Man" – 2:30
Side two
  1. "The Great Grandfather" – 2:40
  2. "Oh Yea" – 2:30
  3. "Don't Let It Go" – 2:36
  4. "Little Girl" – 2:35
  5. "Dearest Darling" – 2:32
  6. "The Clock Strikes Twelve" – 2:35

Personnel[edit]

Per liner notes[2][3]

Cover versions[edit]

The song "Little Girl" was covered by British R&B group The Yardbirds on their album Five Live Yardbirds and was the first of three Bo Diddley songs released on the album. The Gants released "Crackin' Up" as a single in 1966. Corey Harris recorded a version of the song "Crackin' Up" on A Tribute to Bo Diddley. The song was also covered by Paul McCartney on Снова в СССР, and was also covered by The Rolling Stones.

Charts[edit]

Singles
Year Single Position
Billboard R&B Singles[11] Billboard Hot 100[11]
1959 "Crackin' Up" #14 #62
1959 "I'm Sorry" #17 -
1959 "Say Man" #3 #20

Release history[edit]

Region Date Label Format Catalog
united States July 1959 Checker Records LP LP-1436
United Kingdom 1959 London Records LP HA-M 2230
United States August 27, 1966 Checker Records Stereo-Pak 21-382A
United States 1967 Checker Records LP LP-3006
United States 1984 Chess Records LP CH-9196

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Overview: Go Bo Diddley by Bo Diddley". Allmusic. United States: Rovi Corporation. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c His Best (CD liner). Bo Diddley. United States: Chess/MCA Records. 1997. CHD-9373. 
  3. ^ a b c I'm a Man: The Chess Masters, 1955–1958 (CD liner). Bo Diddley. United States: Hip-O Select. 2007. 
  4. ^ a b Strong, Charles (2002) [Originally published in 1994]. The Great Rock Discography (Sixth ed.). United Kingdom: Canongate Books. p. 371. ISBN 1-84195-312-1. 
  5. ^ a b "Reviews of New Pop Records". Billboard: 63. August 24, 1959. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Reviews of This Week's Singles". Billboard: 45. August 24, 1959. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  7. ^ "500 Greatest Albums: Bo Diddley/Go Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2012-01-06. 
  8. ^ "Bo Diddley - Billboard Singles". Allmusic. United States: Rovi Corporation. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  9. ^ Glover, Tony; Scott Dirks; Ward Gaines (2002). Blues with a feeling: the Little Walter story. Routledge. pp. 147–48. ISBN 978-0-415-93711-5. 
  10. ^ a b Go Bo Diddley LP 1436 Sleeve Notes
  11. ^ a b http://www.allmusic.com/artist/p57518