God's Philosophers

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God's Philosophers: How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science is a book by James Hannam which rebuts "the idea ‘that there was no science worth mentioning in the Middle Ages … [and] that the Church held back what meagre advances were made’."[1] Hannam argues that "medieval scholars overturned the false wisdom of ancient Greece to lay the foundations of modern science."[2] The book rebuts a number of modern canards about Medieval Christianity, such as:

He lists 13th century inventions such as spectacles, the mechanical clock, and the windmill.

The book was published in the UK in 2009 by Icon Books Ltd. (ISBN 978-1848310704) and is included in the short list for the Royal Society's 2010 Science Book Prize. The US edition was published in 2011 by Regnery Press under the title The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. In 2011 the book was shortlisted for the Dingle Prize of the British Society for the History of Science.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dan Jones, The New Age of Enlightenment, review of James Hannam, God's Philosophers: How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science, in The Spectator, 15 August 2009.
  2. ^ Book website
  3. ^ BSHS Dingle Prize's webpage

External links[edit]