God Moves in a Mysterious Way

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"God Moves in a Mysterious Way"
Music: The Psalmes of David in Prose and Meeter
Words: William Cowper
Published 1774
Language English
Meter 8.6.8.6 (CM)
Melody name London New
365 in NEH
445 in Common Praise
373 in HAM
677 in The Hymnal 1982
434 in PsH
128 in Trinity Hymnal
73 in BH
412 in NCH
483 in LBW
765 in LSB
546 in LW
65 in WR

God Moves in a Mysterious Way is Christian hymn, written in 1773 by William Cowper from England.

History[edit]

Words[edit]

William Cowper, who wrote the hymn

The words were composed by William Cowper (1731-1800). Comprising six verses, they were written in 1773, just before the onset of a depressive illness, during which Cowper attempted suicide by drowning. It is thought to be the last hymn that he wrote, as he turned away from Christianity after his suicide bid, convinced that he was beyond redemption. The text was first published by Cowper's friend, John Henry Newton, in his Twenty-six Letters on Religious Subjects; to which are added Hymns in 1774. The hymn was later published in Olney Hymns which Cowper co-wrote with Newton. Entitled Conflict: Light Shining out of Darkness, it was accompanied by a text from Saint John's Gospel, Chapter 13: Verse 7, which quotes Jesus saying to his disciples; "What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter."[1]

First verse:

"God moves in a mysterious way
His wonders to perform;
He plants His footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm."

The first line of the hymn has become an adage or saying, used to justify unfortunate or inexplicable events,[2] and is referenced in many literary works.[3]

Music[edit]

The hymn tune London New comes from the The Psalmes of David in Prose and Meeter of 1635. In Common Praise, it is in D major. A popular alternative and rather similar tune is Dundee, which comes from the Scottish Psalter of 1615; the harmony was arranged by Thomas Ravenscroft (1592-1635) in 1621.[4] Other traditional tunes include Manoah, first published by Henry Wellington Greatorex in Boston, Massachusetts in 1843 but sometimes attributed to Joseph Haydn,[5] and Irish by Charles Wesley, first published in 1749.[6]

Inclusion in other works[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Audio clips[edit]

Video clips[edit]