Godfrey Faussett

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Godfrey Faussett (c.1781–1853) was an English clergyman and academic, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at Oxford from 1827. He was known as a controversialist. As a churchman he exemplified the "high-and-dry" tradition.[1]

Life[edit]

He was the son of Henry Godfrey Faussett of Kent (son of Bryan Faussett) and Susan Sandys. He graduated B.A. at Corpus Christi College, Oxford in 1801, and M.A. in 1804 as a Fellow of Magdalen College. He became B.D. in 1822 and D.D. in 1827, the year in which he was elected Lady Margaret Professor.[2][3]

Faussett was Bampton Lecturer, publishing The Claims of the Established Church to exclusive attachment and support, and the Dangers which menace her from Schism and Indifference, considered (1820).[4] He took the conservative side of the religious issues in the university, opposing the 1834 bill of George William Wood to allow dissenters to enter (on a committee with Edward Burton, John Henry Newman, Edward Pusey and William Sewell), and defending subscription to the Thirty Nine Articles in 1835 with Vaughan Thomas and Newman.[5][6]

Faussett's 1838 sermon The Revival of Popery was provoked by the Tractarian publication of the Remains of Hurrell Froude, who had died in 1836; in it Faussett denounced Newman and John Keble.[7][8] It echoed an 1831 sermon of Burton preached against Henry Bellenden Bulteel.[9] It also proved a turning point as far as traditional High Church support for the Oxford Movement went within the university, since Faussett's alienation reflected the views of others in the camp.[10] Newman replied in a "Letter to Faussett" in June of that year, significant in its abandonment of his previous views on the Antichrist.[11] In 1843 Faussett complained to the vice-chancellor Philip Wynter about a sermon by Pusey. The outcome was that Pusey was banned from preaching for two years.[12]

Works[edit]

In 1830 Faussett attacked Henry Hart Milman's History of the Jews (1829) in a sermon Jewish History Vindicated from the Unscriptural View of it Displayed in the History of the Jews.[13] The Alliance of Church and State Explained and Vindicated (1834) protested against the power of non-Anglicans to legislate for the Church of England.[14]

Family[edit]

Faussett married first Marianne-Elizabeth Bridges of Thanet; they had two sons and two daughters. Thomas Godfrey Faussett was his son by his second wife Sarah Wethered of Great Marlow.[15][16]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Michael George Brock; Mark Charles Curthoys (1997). 19th century Oxford. Oxford University Press. p. 200. ISBN 978-0-19-951016-0. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  2. ^ The Gentleman's Magazine. F. Jefferies. 1853. p. 644. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Edward Hasted (1800). "Parishes: Nackington". The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Godfrey Faussett (1820). The claims of the established church to exclusive attachment and support: and the dangers which menace her from schism and indifference, considered; in eight sermons preached before the University of Oxford, in the year MDCCCXX, at the lecture founded by the late Rev. John Bampton. The University Press for the author. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Michael George Brock; Mark Charles Curthoys (1997). 19th century Oxford. Oxford University Press. pp. 212–3. ISBN 978-0-19-951016-0. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Michael George Brock; Mark Charles Curthoys (1997). 19th century Oxford. Oxford University Press. p. 221. ISBN 978-0-19-951016-0. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  7. ^ Peter B. Nockles (12 December 1996). The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760-1857. Cambridge University Press. p. 281. ISBN 978-0-521-58719-8. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  8. ^ Francis McGrath (1997). John Henry Newman: Universal Revelation. Mercer University Press. p. 82 note 30. ISBN 978-0-86554-603-5. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Frank Miller Turner (2002). John Henry Newman: The Challenge to Evangelical Religion. Yale University Press. p. 318. ISBN 978-0-300-09251-6. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  10. ^ Michael George Brock; Mark Charles Curthoys (1997). 19th century Oxford. Oxford University Press. p. 235. ISBN 978-0-19-951016-0. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  11. ^ Paul Misner (1976). Papacy and Development: Newman and the Primacy of the Pope. Brill Archive. p. 186. GGKEY:55KB7LUHPBK. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  12. ^ Michael George Brock; Mark Charles Curthoys (1997). 19th century Oxford. Oxford University Press. p. 243. ISBN 978-0-19-951016-0. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  13. ^ William R. McKelvy (2007). The English Cult of Literature: Devoted Readers, 1774-1880. University of Virginia Press. p. 317. ISBN 978-0-8139-2571-4. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  14. ^ Peter B. Nockles (12 December 1996). The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760-1857. Cambridge University Press. pp. 79–80. ISBN 978-0-521-58719-8. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  15. ^ Sir Bernard Burke (1852). A genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the landed gentry of Great Britain & Ireland for 1852. Colburn and Company. p. 403. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  16. ^  "Faussett, Thomas Godfrey". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.