Goldman–Sachs family

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The Goldman–Sachs family is a prominent family and financial dynasty of German Jewish descent, known for the leading investment bank Goldman Sachs. Marcus Goldman's youngest daughter, Louisa, married Samuel Sachs, the son of close friends and fellow Lower Franconia, Bavaria immigrants.[1] Louisa's older sister and Sam's older brother had already married. His oldest son, Julius Goldman, married Sarah Adler, daughter of Samuel Adler.[2] In 1882, Goldman invited his son-in-law Samuel to join him in the business and changed the firm's name to M. Goldman and Sachs. For almost fifty years, all the partners came from the extended family.[3]

Family tree[edit]

Marcus Goldman
  • Marcus Goldman (1821–1904), founder of Goldman Sachs, married to Bertha Goldman
    • Julius Goldman married to Sarah Adler Goldman, daughter of Samuel Adler (1809–1891)
      • Hetty Goldman (1881–1972), archaeologist
      • Agnes Goldman Sanborn (1887–1984), married to Ashton Sanborn (1882–1970), archaeologist
    • Rebecca Goldman Dreyfuss, married to Ludwig Dreyfuss (–1918)[4]
    • Rosa Goldman Sachs married to Julius Sachs (1849–1934)
    • Louisa Goldman Sachs married to Samuel Sachs (1851–1935)
      • Paul J. Sachs (1878–1965), art historian, married to Meta Pollak (–1961)
        • Elizabeth Sachs
        • Celia Sachs Robinson, married to Charles A. Robinson, Jr. (1900–1965), classical scholar
        • Marjorie Sachs
      • Walter E. Sachs (1884–1980), banker (partner at Goldman Sachs 1928–1959),[5] married to Mary Williamson (1911–), actress
        • Katherine Russell Sachs (1943–)
        • Philip Williamson Sachs (1949–)
    • Henry Goldman (1857–1937), banker, married to Babette Kaufman (1871–1954)
      • Florence Goldman (1891–1960), married to Edwin Chester Vogel (1884–1973)
      • Henry Goldman Jr., married to Adrienne Straus Goldman

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kappner, Cordula (2008-03-12). "Marcus Goldmann und der amerikanische Traum". Mainpost (in German). 
  2. ^ Cohen, Getzel M.; Joukowsky, Martha Sharp (2006). Breaking Ground: Pioneering Women Archaeologists. University of Michigan Press. p. 299. ISBN 0472031740. 
  3. ^ a b Fisher, June Breton (2010). When Money Was in Fashion: Henry Goldman, Goldman Sachs and the Founding of Wall Street. Palgrave MacMillan. 
  4. ^ "Dreyfuss Left $1,305,318: Bulk of Wealth Will Benefit Jewish Philanthropies". New York Times. August 19, 1919. 
  5. ^ "Walter E. Sachs, 96, of Financial House; Was a Partner in Goldman, Sachs Since 1910, Guiding Concern Through Difficult Times". New York Times. August 23, 1980. 
  6. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths: Breton Fisher, June, of Santa Barbara, CA". New York Times. January 15, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Birmingham, Stephen (1996). Our Crowd: The Great Jewish Families of New York. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 0815604114. 
  • Supple, Barry E. (1957). "A Business Elite: German-Jewish Financiers in Nineteenth-Century New York". Business History Review 31 (2): 143–178. JSTOR 3111848. 
  • Alef, Daniel (2010). Henry Goldman: Goldman Sachs and the Beginning of Investment Banking. Titans of Fortune. ISBN 1608043169. 
  • Fisher, June Breton (2010). When Money Was in Fashion: Henry Goldman, Goldman Sachs and the Founding of Wall Street. Palgrave MacMillan. 
  • C-SPAN BookTV, author presents When Money Was in Fashion [1]