Golf course superintendent

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A Golf course superintendent is a person who professionally manages the labor, time, materials and financial resources needed to care for the turfgrass and landscaped grounds on a golf course. Golf course superintendents have also been referred to as greenskeepers and turf managers. Golf course superintendents are concerned with the environmental health of the golf course, the sporting needs of the players and the financial sustainability of the golf club or country club for which they work. Golf course superintendents communicate the status of the grounds and maintenance resources to members of the club’s management, owners or board of directors, green chairs and committees, golfers, vendors, suppliers, golf professionals, golf course architects and others in the golf industry. Their management strategies must also align with the golf club business’ environmental and philanthropic role in the community.

Golf course superintendents carefully monitor the natural weather patterns, environment and other influences that affect the playing areas and landscapes with which golfers interact. Golf course superintendents monitor the health of the golf course environment through careful study, diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury to the golf course’s turfgrass fairways, tees and greens areas, as well as bunkers, areas of water hazard, naturalized areas and trees. Their skilled management of the course is accomplished through a detailed knowledge of biology, chemistry, plant pathology and entomology. Golf course superintendents can be officially certified by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA).

Certified Golf Course Superintendent[edit]

A Certified Golf Course Superintendent is one that has voluntarily met the requirements set forth by the GCSAA to receive the professional distinction of a CGCS. The requirements to qualify for eligibility into the certification program vary depending on years of education, focus of the education, continuing education credits received, and the number of years as a class "A” Superintendent. Once eligible, one must complete a portfolio of work samples, case studies, and skill statements. This portfolio must be completed and approved by two existing Certified Superintendents. In addition to the completed portfolio, a rigorous closed book exam must be passed. Finally, the superintendents current facility must be inspected, evaluated, and "passed" by two current Certified Superintendents. Once certified, superintendents must partake in a required amount of education classes and service activities as well as uphold a code of ethics, specific to those of the CGCS distinction.


Job responsibilities[edit]

Golf course superintendents skillfully maintain a course’s turfgrass, which is considered to be a manufactured product because it is specifically planted, raised and maintained to provide players with a surface on which to play golf. There is a science-based process behind the turfgrass they produce which involves various steps and stages throughout the year. The average golf course superintendent makes between $70–80,000 a year. On more prestigious courses they can make over $150,000 a year. As of the year 2010, there were superintendents making over $400,000 a year, some of whom got that salary directly and others considering benefits such as, but not limited to: free house, free vehicle, free gasoline and holiday bonuses.

External links[edit]

Sources[edit]

1. Golf Course Superintendents Association of America. [1]
2. United States Golf Association. [2]

3. North Carolina State University Turf Files Glossary. [5]
4. The North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, INSECT and other PESTS associated with TURF. [6]
5. New England Greenkeepr. [7] 6. Rocky Mountain GCSA. [8]