Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now

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"Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now"
Written by Milton Kellem
Published 1951
Language English
Original artist Teresa Brewer
Recorded by Patience and Prudence, Tracey Dey, Skeeter Davis

"Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now" is a popular song written by Milton Kellem,[1] and published in 1951. Originally written in English, it has been done in several styles and tempos.

The original version, recorded by Teresa Brewer with Orchestra directed by Ray Bloch on January 10, 1952, was released by Coral Records as catalog number 60676 on April 5, 1952.[1] It reached #25 on the Billboard charts.[1] It was done in a "Swing" style, with big band backing (including mouth harp).

Patience and Prudence had more success with the song when they recorded it in 1956 reaching #11 on the charts.[2] This is considered the benchmark version, by which all others are judged, due to the intimate harmony of the two young singers. This version brightened the melody somewhat, and later artists followed the brighter version, as did Brewer when she recorded an album version in 1964 in a semi-Caribbean style.

Two other versions hit the US chart in 1964 as sung by Tracey Dey (peaking at #51)[3] and Skeeter Davis (peaking at #48).[4]

Dey's version was done in a style emulating the Wall of Sound, which was popular with girl groups at the time.

Davis' version reached the Top 10 on Country charts, and is considered by oldies enthusiasts to be "the" cover version. Where the Patience and Prudence version has an orchestral backing, the Davis version has a pop band backing of electronic organ, bass and drums, with violin and backup singers.

Cover versions[edit]

In addition to the hit versions of the 1960s, the song has been recorded by:

  • The Bell Sisters in 1956, using the alternate title "Boom Boom, My Honey" on the Bermuda Records label, with a simple, slightly Calypso arrangement and Jamaican accents.
  • Chet Atkins on his 1968 LP Solo Flights
  • Skeeter Davis, in 1964 and again in 1971
  • The Vibrations (1966), who did a funk-style version
  • Trini Lopez (1967)
  • Brent Dowe and The Melodians (1967), who recorded the rocksteady version produced by Duke Reid.
  • Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams, who recorded a version on their 1976 novelty LP, Laverne & Shirley Sing.[5]
  • Viola Wills (1979), doing a version in "disco" or "dance" style, with a slower tempo and heavy electronic instrumental backing. This is the style done by most later artists. The Viola Wills version of the song peaked at number fifty-two on the disco chart.[6]
  • Tina Charles on her 1977 album, Rendezvous.
  • Bad Manners (1989), a ska version
  • The Lemonheads (1991)
  • Mr President (1995), done in a Eurodance style.
  • Cristina del Valle, in Catalan, again in a dance style and tempo
  • Soraya Arnelas (2007), in both English and Spanish (not mixing the languages), dance style
  • She & Him, with vocals by Zooey Deschanel, covering Skeeter Davis's version of the song on their 2010 album Volume Two
  • UB40, on their Labour of Love IV album (2010) and as a single released on 25 January 2010

References[edit]