Gonzaga Bulldogs men's basketball

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Gonzaga Bulldogs
2015–16 Gonzaga Bulldogs men's basketball team
Gonzaga Bulldogs athletic logo
University Gonzaga University
Conference WCC
Location Spokane, WA
Head coach Mark Few (17th year)
Arena McCarthey Athletic Center
(Capacity: 6,000)
Nickname Bulldogs / Zags
Student section Kennel Club
Colors

Blue, Red, and White

                  
Uniforms
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Home jersey
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Team colours
Home
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Away jersey
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Team colours
Away
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Alternate jersey
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Team colours
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1999, 2015
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1999, 2000, 2001, 2006, 2009, 2015
NCAA Tournament appearances
1995, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Conference tournament champions
1995, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015
Conference regular season champions
1966, 1967, 1994, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015

The Gonzaga Bulldogs men's basketball team is the intercollegiate men's basketball program representing Gonzaga University. The school competes in the West Coast Conference in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Bulldogs play home basketball games at the McCarthey Athletic Center in Spokane, Washington on the university campus.

Gonzaga has had 14 of its players receive the WCC Player of the Year award,[1] and two players, Frank Burgess in 1961 with 32.4 points per game, and Adam Morrison in 2006 with 28.1 points per game, have led the nation in scoring. Adam Morrison was named the Co-National Player of the year for the 2005-06 season,[2] along with Duke's J.J. Redick.

Team history[edit]

Early years[edit]

Gonzaga introduced a basketball program during the 1907–08 basketball season. During that season, they had no coach, but managed to achieve a record of 9–2 (.818).[3] In the 1908/09 season, George Varnell became the first official coach for Gonzaga, earning a 10–2 (.833) record during his only season with Gonzaga. Varnell was replaced by William Mulligan the following season, who acquired an 11–3 (.786) record.[4] Frank McKevitt took over for Mulligan during the 1910–11 basketball season, acquiring an 8–1 (.889) record, which was the highest winning percentage for Gonzaga basketball at the time.[4] From 1944 to 1994 the Bulldogs compiled a record of 628-531 (0.542), earning regular season titles in 1965-66, 1966–67 and 1993-94. 1993-94 also saw the team qualify for its first postseason tournament, the NIT. A year later, the 1994-95 team would make the school's first appearance into the NCAA tournament, under coach Dan Fitzgerald. [5]

Dan Monson (1997–1999)[edit]

In 1997, Gonzaga assistant coach Dan Monson, the son of veteran Oregon and Idaho basketball coach Don Monson, became head coach of Gonzaga as Dan Fitzgerald wanted to focus on his athletic director's duties.[6] During his first season, Monson led the Zags to a 24–10 record and a WCC regular-season title, which was not enough to land Gonzaga an at-large bid into the NCAA Tournament.[6] However, the Bulldogs would earn a bid into the 1998 National Invitation Tournament, where they beat Wyoming 69–55 in the first round before falling to Hawai'i 78–70 in the second round.[7]

During the 1998–99 season, the Bulldogs finished with a 28–7 record and the conference tournament championship, which gave Gonzaga a 10-seed into the 1999 NCAA Tournament.[8] In what would be the tournament's "Cinderella" run and Gonzaga's "coming out party" (Gonzaga has made the NCAA Tournament each year since) the Zags beat seventh-seeded Minnesota 75–63 in the first round and followed it with an 82–74 win over second-seeded Stanford to advance to the regional semifinals.[9] The Zags would go on to beat Florida 73–72 to advance to the regional finals after Casey Calvary tipped in the winning basket with four seconds remaining.[6] They trailed eventual national champion UConn by one point with a minute remaining before losing 67–62 in the regional finals.[10]

Mark Few (1999–present)[edit]

Mark Few during a game against San Diego on February 18, 2008

After Dan Monson took the head coaching position at Minnesota,[11] assistant coach Mark Few was named the new head coach on July 26, 1999.[12] In his inaugural season, Few led the Zags to a 26–9 record, which was highlighted by winning the WCC Tournament and advancing to the Sweet 16 of the 2000 NCAA Tournament with wins over Louisville and St. John's.[13]

In the 2000–01 season, the Bulldogs faced a tough schedule highlighted by games against Arizona, Washington, Florida, and New Mexico.[14] Despite starting the season 5–1, the Zags dropped four of their next five games.[15] Gonzaga rebounded and finished the regular season 15–1[15] before winning their third consecutive WCC Tournament title.[16] The win gave the Bulldogs an automatic bid into the 2001 NCAA Tournament, where they were given a 12-seed.[17] In the first round game against fifth-seeded Virginia, Casey Calvary put back a blocked shot with nine seconds left to give the Zags an 86–85 victory.[18] Gonzaga would go on to beat 13th-seeded Indiana State 85–68 in the second round to advance to their third consecutive Sweet 16 appearance.[19] The Zags would go on to lose to defending national champion Michigan State 77–62 and finished the season with a 26–7 record.[20]

Before the 2001–02 season started, the Bulldogs were unanimously favored to win the WCC title in the 2001–02 WCC preseason coaches poll.[21] Few led the Zags to a share of the WCC regular season title, as Pepperdine also had a 13–1 conference record.[22] The Bulldogs would avenge their only conference loss of the season by defeating Pepperdine 96–90 for their fourth straight WCC title.[23] The win gave the Zags an automatic bid as a six-seed in the 2002 NCAA Tournament, where they would face 11th-seeded Wyoming.[24] Despite beating the Cowboys in the 1998 National Invitation Tournament,[24] they would end up losing 73–66, marking the first time the Zags lost in the first round of the tournament in the Mark Few era.[25][26]

In the 2002–03 season, Few led the Bulldogs to their fifth regular season title in six years with a 12–2 conference record.[27] Despite this, Gonzaga lost to San Diego in the WCC Tournament championship game 72–63,[28] marking the first time the Zags had lost in the championship game in four years.[29] Gonzaga garnered a nine-seed in the 2003 NCAA Tournament, where they beat Cincinnati 74–69 to advance to the second round of the tournament for the fourth time in five years.[30] The Bulldogs would go on to lose to Arizona 96–95 in double overtime to finish 24–9.[31][32]

The 2003–04 season marked the first time that the team participated in the annual Battle in Seattle game.[33] Gonzaga faced third-ranked Missouri, who was the highest-ranked regular season opponent that the Zags had played against up to that point; they would go on to win the game in an 87–80 overtime victory.[34] This season marked the last time Gonzaga would play home games in the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre; their last game in the building took place February 28, 2004, where they beat Santa Clara 80–64.[35] The win gave the Bulldogs their first undefeated run through the WCC in school history with a 14–0 conference record.[35] Gonzaga would go on to receive an automatic bid into the 2004 NCAA Tournament with a two-seed, which was the highest seed they had received in school history in seven tournament appearances.[36] The Bulldogs would go on to beat 15th-seeded Valparaiso 76–49[37] before being upset in the second round by tenth-seeded Nevada 91–72, where they finished the season 28–3.[38]

Gonzaga opened up the 2004–05 season with a home game against Portland State in the new 6,000-seat McCarthey Athletic Center on November 19, 2004.[39] Despite losing five seniors, including second-round NBA draft pick Blake Stepp,[40] Few was still able to lead the Zags to their ninth regular season title since 1994 with a 12–2 conference record.[41] The Bulldogs would go on to win their second straight WCC Tournament title,[42] giving them an automatic bid into the 2005 NCAA Tournament as a three-seed.[43] The Zags beat 14th-seeded Winthrop 74–64[44] before falling to Texas Tech 71–69 in the second round, where they ended the season with a 26–5 record.[45]

Before the 2005–06 season got underway, Gonzaga junior Adam Morrison became the first player in team history to be named to the preseason Associated Press All-America team.[46] The Zags also received their highest preseason ranking in program history at number seven in the USA Today/ESPN preseason poll.[47] The Bulldogs captured their third straight WCC Tournament title when they beat Loyola Marymount 68–67 in the championship game.[48] They received an automatic bid into the 2006 NCAA Tournament as a three-seed, where they beat Xavier 79–75 in the first round.[49] The Zags would go on to beat Indiana Hoosiers 90–80,[50] where they would advance to the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2001.[26] Despite being ahead by as many as 17 points, the Bulldogs ended their season in the Sweet 16 by losing to UCLA 73–71, finishing 29–4.[51][52]

The 2006–07 season marked the first time that the Zags suffered at least ten losses in a season since the 1997–98 season.[53] Despite this, Few still led the Bulldogs to their seventh straight regular season title with a conference record of 11–3.[54] Gonzaga would go on to the win the WCC Tournament for the fourth year in a row, being the only Division I school to do so that year.[55] They received an automatic bid into the 2007 NCAA Tournament, where they were given a 10-seed.[56] The Zags would end their season by losing in the opening round for the first time since 2001, as Indiana beat Gonzaga 70–57.[57]

Facilities[edit]

The McCarthey Athletic Center has been home to Gonzaga's basketball teams since 2004.

Basketball started at Gonzaga in February 1905 after a gymnasium was put in as an addition to the east end of the new college building that was being built.[58] In 1955, the basketball team moved from the gymnasium, nicknamed "the cave",[59] and began to play at the newly constructed Spokane Coliseum.[60] On June 3, 1964, construction began for a new 3,800-seat athletic facility called the John F. Kennedy Memorial Pavilion.[59] To raise money for the $1.1 million project, Gonzaga's student body had each student pay $10 per semester until $500,000 was raised. The university matched that amount, while the remaining $100,000 came from contributions.[59] Gonzaga's first game in the pavilion took place on December 3, 1965 against Washington State, who beat the Bulldogs 106–78.[61][62] In 1986, the facility was renamed the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre after an eponymous donor donated $4.5 million to finance a remodel of the arena that could hold up to 4,000 people.[63][64]

After competing for over 39 years in the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre,[65] Gonzaga trustees approved construction for a new 6,000-seat arena on April 11, 2003.[66] The McCarthey Athletic Center was named after Gonzaga trustee Philip G. McCarthey and Gonzaga regent Thomas K. McCarthey, who contributed a significant portion of the funds needed to build the arena.[67] The first official game took place on November 19, 2004 against Portland State, whom the Zags would beat 98–80 in front of a sold-out crowd.[39][68] The Bulldogs opened the arena with a 38-game winning streak, which was the nation's longest active winning streak at the time.[69] When combined with 12 wins at the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre, the overall home-game winning streak ended at 50 games with a loss to the Santa Clara on February 12, 2007.[69] In February 2015, BYU snapped Gonzaga's 41-game home winning streak in the McCarthey Athletic Center, which was also the longest active home winning streak in the NCAA at the time.[70] As of March 1, 2015, the Zags are 149–9 in the building, which includes a 69–6 record in non-conference games, a 80–3 record in conference games, and a 2–0 record in the WCC Tournament.[71]

Traditions[edit]

Battle in Seattle[edit]

Battle in Seattle Results
Year Opponent Result Score Attendance
2003 #3 Missouri Won 87–80 (OT) 12,831
2004 Massachusetts Won 68–57 10,126
2005 Oklahoma State Won 64–62 13,644
2006 #24 Nevada Lost 74–82 15,110
2007 #11 Tennessee Lost 72–82 15,141
2008 #2 Connecticut Lost 83–88 (OT) 16,763
2009 Davidson Won 103–91 13,176
2010 #20 Illinois Lost 61–73 14,789
2011 Arizona Won 71–60 15,127
2012 Kansas State Won 68–52 16,241
2013 South Alabama Won 68–59 9,140
2014 Cal Poly Won 63–50 11,741

On December 13, 2003, Gonzaga participated in a neutral court game at KeyArena that would later become an annual event known as the Battle in Seattle.[33] The event marked the first time that a regular season Gonzaga basketball game was broadcast nationally on CBS Sports, as Craig Bolerjack called the action while Clark Kellogg provided commentary.[72] Ranked third in the country, Missouri was the highest ranked regular season opponent that Gonzaga had faced up to that point; the Bulldogs would go on to beat the Tigers 87–80 in overtime.[34]

The 2005 Battle in Seattle is remembered for Adam Morrison's game-winning shot against Oklahoma State that sealed a 64–62 victory for the Bulldogs.[73] Gus Johnson's call at the end of the game with Bill Raftery[74] was ranked fourth on a list of 25 of his most "over-the-top calls" by Complex.[75] Johnson's call at the end of the game:

In 2008, the game broke the state attendance record for a regular season college basketball game, as a sold out crowd of 16,763 watched the Bulldogs play Connecticut.[76] The Zags have compiled a 8–4 record in the annual event since they first appeared in it back in 2003.[77]

Impact[edit]

University enrollment[edit]

Freshman enrollment at Gonzaga in the mid-nineties hovered around 500 students annually, including a total of 569 as late as 1998.[78] In 1999, enrollment jumped to 701 five months after the Zags went to the Elite Eight.[78] This trend continued after Gonzaga won five games in the 1999 and 2000 NCAA Tournaments, as freshman enrollment increased to 796 in 2000 and to a record 979 in 2001.[78] A 65-percent increase in the size of the freshman class between 1997 and 2003 is part of a phenomenon called the Flutie Effect, the increase in attention and applications for admission that results after a particularly notable and unexpected sporting victory by a school's athletic team. Gonzaga University president Rev. Robert Spitzer said that the team's success was responsible for the school receiving the $23 million required to build the McCarthey Athletic Center, most of which was received through major gifts.[79]

Coaching records[edit]

Name Years Record Win %
George Varnell 1908–09 10–2 .833
William Mulligan 1909–10 11–3 .786
Frank McKevitt 1910–11 8–1 .889
Fred Burns 1911–12 4–2 .667
Ed Mulholland 1912–13 4–2 .667
R. E. Harmon 1913–15 10–4 .714
William S. Higgins 1915–16 2–7 .222
John F. McGough 1916–17 4–5 .444
Guy Condon 1917–18 3–2 .600
Edward Geheves 1918–20 9–17 .346
Gus Dorais 1920–25 34–53 .391
Maurice Smith 1925–31 46–59 .438
S. Dagly 1931–32 4–7 .364
Perry Ten Eyck 1932–33 4–15 .211
Claude McGrath 1933–42; 1946–49 129–133 .492
B. Frasier 1942–43 2–9 .182
Charles Henry 1943–44 22–4 .846
Eugene Wozny 1944–45 12–19 .387
Gordon White 1945–46 6–14 .300
L. T. Underwood 1949–51 26–33 .441
Hank Anderson 1951–72 290–275 .513
Adrian Buoncristiani 1972–78 78–82 .488
Dan Fitzgerald 1978–81; 1985–97 252–171 .596
Jay Hillock 1981–85 60–50 .545
Dan Monson 1997–99 52–17 .754
Mark Few 1999–present 438–103 .810

Season-by-season results[edit]

Record vs. WCC Opponents[edit]

The Gonzaga Bulldogs lead the all-time series vs. all other nine WCC opponents.[80]

  • Note all-time series includes non-conference matchups.
  • Last updated March 11, 2015
Opponent Wins Losses Pct. Streak
BYU 8 4 .667 Gonzaga 1
Loyola Marymount 62 23 .729 Gonzaga 12
Pacific 7 1 .875 Gonzaga 5
Pepperdine 49 31 .613 Gonzaga 27
Portland 94 66 .588 Gonzaga 3
Saint Mary's 62 27 .697 Gonzaga 8
San Diego 65 21 .756 Gonzaga 2
San Francisco 51 22 .699 Gonzaga 7
Santa Clara 54 30 .643 Gonzaga 10

Gonzaga vs. the AP Top 25 (since 1998–99)[edit]

Since the season of Gonzaga's 1999 NCAA Division 1 Men's Basketball Tournament run to the Elite 8, Gonzaga has played a total of 73 games against teams ranked in the AP Top 25 Poll. Gonzaga has a record of 25–48 against such teams. They have beaten a team ranked #3 on three occasions (2003-04 season against Missouri, and the 2004-05 season against Georgia Tech and Oklahoma State), and beat a 2nd ranked North Carolina in November 2006.

Year Opponent Score
1998–99
(3-4)
#8 Kansas
#15 Purdue
#22 Washington
#24 TCU
#7 Stanford
#23 Florida
#3 Connecticut
Lost 80–66
Lost 83-68
Won 82–71
Lost 90–87
Won 82–74
Won 73–72
Lost 67–62
1999–2000
(2-3)
#1 Cincinnati
#19 Temple
#11 UCLA
#9 St. John's
#25 Purdue
Lost 75–68
Lost 64–48
Won 59–43
Won 82–76
Lost 75–66
2000–01
(1-3)
#5 Arizona
#8 Florida
#16 Virginia
#3 Michigan State
Lost 101–87
Lost 85–71
Won 86–85
Lost 77–62
2001–02
(1-1)
#3 Illinois
#21 Fresno State
Lost 76–58
Won 87–77
2002–03
(0-3)
#19 Indiana
#15 Kentucky
#2 Arizona
Lost 76–75
Lost 80–72
Lost 96–95 2OT
2003–04
(1-2)
#17 St. Joseph's
#3 Missouri
#9 Stanford
Lost 73–66
Won 87–80 OT
Lost 87–80
2004–05
(3-2)
#5 Illinois
#14 Washington
#3 Georgia Tech
#3 Oklahoma State
#24 Texas Tech
Lost 89–72
Won 99–87
Won 85–73
Won 78–75
Lost 71–69
2005–06
(2-4)
#23 Maryland
#12 Michigan State
#3 Connecticut
#18 Washington
#4 Memphis
#7 UCLA
Won 88–76
Won 109–106 3OT
Lost 65–63
Lost 99–95
Lost 83–72
Lost 73–71
2006–07
(3-3)
#2 North Carolina
#13 Washington
#6 Duke
#24 Nevada
#23 Stanford
#8 Memphis
Won 82–74
Won 97–77
Lost 61–54
Lost 82–74
Won 90–86 2OT
Lost 78–77 OT
2007–08
(1-5)
#8 Washington State
#11 Tennessee
#1 Memphis
#25 St. Mary's
#25 St. Mary's
#23 Davidson
Lost 51–47
Lost 82–72
Lost 81–73
Lost 89–85 OT
Won 88–76
Lost 82–76
2008–09
(3-3)
#12 Tennessee
#2 Connecticut
#15 Tennessee
#22 St. Mary's
#14 Memphis
#2 North Carolina
Won 83–74
Lost 88–83 OT
Won 89–79 OT
Won 69–62
Lost 68–50
Lost 98–77
2009–10
(0-3)
#2 Michigan State
#7 Duke
#4 Syracuse
Lost 75–71
Lost 76–41
Lost 87–65
2010–11
(2-5)
#25 San Diego State
#3 Kansas State
#20 Illinois
#23 Notre Dame
#9 Baylor
#18 St. John's
#10 BYU
Lost 79–76
Lost 81–64
Lost 73–61
Lost 83–79
Won 68–64
Won 86–71
Lost 89–67
2011–12
(1-1)
#16 Saint Mary's
#7 Ohio State
Won 73–59
Lost 73–66
2012–13
(1-2)
#13 Illinois
#22 Oklahoma State
#13 Butler
Lost 85–74
Won 69–68
Lost 64–63
2013–14
(0-2)
#24 Memphis
#4 Arizona
Lost 60–54
Lost 84–61
2014–15
(1-2)
#22 SMU
#3 Arizona
#4 Duke
Won 72–56
Lost 66–63 OT
Lost 66–52

Teams in bold represent games Gonzaga played in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament.

WCC Tournament results[edit]

NCAA Tournament[edit]

The Bulldogs have appeared in 18 NCAA Tournaments, including 17 straight appearances. Gonzaga's combined record is 22–18.

Year Record Seed Round Opponent Result/Score
1995 21–9 #14 Round of 64 #3 Maryland L 87–63
1999 28–7 #10 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#7 Minnesota
#2 Stanford
#6 Florida
#1 Connecticut
W 75–63
W 82–74
W 73–72
L 67–62
2000 26–9 #10 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
#7 Louisville
#2 St. John's
#6 Purdue
W 77–66
W 82–76
L 75–66
2001 26–7 #12 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
#5 Virginia
#13 Indiana State
#1 Michigan State
W 86–85
W 85–68
L 77–62
2002 29–4 #6 Round of 64 #11 Wyoming L 73–66
2003 24–9 #9 Round of 64
Round of 32
#8 Cincinnati
#1 Arizona
W 74–69
L 96–95 2OT
2004 28–3 #2 Round of 64
Round of 32
#15 Valparaiso
#10 Nevada
W 76–49
L 91–72
2005 26–5 #3 Round of 64
Round of 32
#14 Winthrop
#6 Texas Tech
W 74–64
L 71–69
2006 29–4 #3 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Xavier
#6 Indiana
#2 UCLA
W 79–75
W 90–80
L 73–71
2007 23–11 #10 Round of 64 #7 Indiana L 70–57
2008 25–8 #7 Round of 64 #10 Davidson L 82–76
2009 28–6 #4 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Akron
#12 Western Kentucky
#1 North Carolina
W 77–64
W 83–81
L 98–77
2010 27–7 #8 Round of 64
Round of 32
#9 Florida State
#1 Syracuse
W 67–60
L 87–65
2011 25–10 #11 Round of 64
Round of 32
#6 St. John's
#3 BYU
W 86–71
L 89–67
2012 26–7 #7 Round of 64
Round of 32
#10 West Virginia
#2 Ohio State
W 77–54
L 73–66
2013 32–3 #1 Round of 64
Round of 32
#16 Southern
#9 Wichita State
W 64–58
L 76–70
2014 29–7 #8 Round of 64
Round of 32
#9 Oklahoma State
#1 Arizona
W 85–77
L 84–61
2015 35–3 #2 Round of 64
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 North Dakota State
#7 Iowa
#11 UCLA
#1 Duke
W 86–76
W 87–68
W 74–62
L 66–52

NCAA Tournament Seeding History[edit]

The NCAA began seeding the tournament with the 1979 edition.

Years → '95 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15
Seeds → 14 10 10 12 6 9 2 3 3 10 7 4 8 11 7 1 8 2

NIT results[edit]

The Bulldogs have appeared in three National Invitation Tournaments (NIT). Gonzaga's combined record is 2–3.

Year Round Opponent Result/Score
1994 First Round
Second Round
Stanford
Kansas State
W 80–76
L 66–64
1996 First Round Washington State L 92–73
1998 First Round
Second Round
Wyoming
Hawaiʻi
W 69–55
L 78–70

Awards[edit]

Conference Coach of the Year[edit]

Year Coach Conference
1966 Hank Anderson Big Sky
1981 Dan Fitzgerald/Pete Barry (San Francisco) WCC
1994 Dan Fitzgerald WCC
1998 Dan Monson WCC
2001 Mark Few WCC
2002 Mark Few WCC
2003 Mark Few WCC
2004 Mark Few WCC
2005 Mark Few WCC
2006 Mark Few WCC
2008 Mark Few/Randy Bennett (Saint Mary's) WCC
2010 Mark Few WCC
2013 Mark Few WCC
2015 Mark Few WCC

West Coast Conference Newcomer of the Year[edit]

Year Player
1997 Matt Santangelo
2001 Blake Stepp
2005 JP Batista
2010 Elias Harris
2011 Marquise Carter
2012 Kevin Pangos
2015 Kyle Wiltjer

West Coast Conference Defensive Player of the Year[edit]

Year Player
2000 Mike Nilson
2001 Mark Spink
2005 Erroll Knight
2012 Robert Sacre
2013 Mike Hart
2015 Gary Bell

West Coast Conference Player of the Year[edit]

See: WCC Player of the Year
Year Player
1984 John Stockton
1994 Jeff Brown
1998 Bakari Hendrix
2001 Casey Calvary
2002 Dan Dickau
2003 Blake Stepp
2004 Blake Stepp
2005 Ronny Turiaf
2006 Adam Morrison
2007 Derek Raivio
2008 Jeremy Pargo
2010 Matt Bouldin
2013 Kelly Olynyk
2015 Kevin Pangos

West Coast Conference Tournament Most Valuable Player[edit]

See: WCC Tournament MVP
Year Player
1995 John Rillie
1999 Matt Santangelo
2000 Casey Calvary
2001 Dan Dickau
2002 Dan Dickau
2004 Ronny Turiaf
2005 Adam Morrison
2006 Adam Morrison
2007 Derek Raivio
2009 Micah Downs
2011 Marquise Carter
2013 Elias Harris
2014 Sam Dower
2015 Kyle Wiltjer

All-Americans[edit]

National Player of the Year
  • Adam Morrison (2006) USBWA, NABC, CBS-Chevrolet, Oscar Robertson
First Team
Second Team
Third Team
Honorable Mention

First-round NBA picks[edit]

Individual Career Records[edit]

  • Last updated March 30, 2015[80]
  • Bold: players expected to be active in the 2015–16 season

Career Wins Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Kevin Pangos 122
2 Gary Bell 116
3 David Stockton 112
4 Sam Dower 110
5 Elias Harris 108
6 Cory Violette 107
7 Ronny Turiaf 106
7 Sean Mallon 106
9 Blake Stepp 105
9 Zach Gourde 105
9 Jeremy Pargo 105
9 Robert Sacre 105
13 Derek Raivio 104
14 Matt Bouldin 101
14 Casey Calvary 101
16 Kyle Bankhead 98
17 David Pendergraft 97
18 Steven Gray 96
18 Przemek Karnowski 96
20 Kyle Dranginis 94

Career Games Played Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Kevin Pangos 142
2 David Stockton 138
3 Sam Dower 137
4 Robert Sacre 136
5 Elias Harris 135
5 Gary Bell 135
7 Casey Calvary 134
7 Zach Gourde 134
7 Jeremy Pargo 134
10 Matt Bouldin 133
11 Matt Santangelo 131
11 David Pendergraft 131
13 Mike Leasure 130
13 Richie Frahm 130
15 Axel Dench 129
15 Cory Violette 129
15 Sean Mallon 129
18 Blake Stepp 128
19 Ronny Turiaf 127
19 Derek Raivio 127

Career Rebounds Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Jerry Vermillion 1,670
2 Elias Harris 979
3 Gary Lechman 910
4 Cory Violette 880
5 Ronny Turiaf 859
6 Greg Sten 783
7 Casey Calvary 757
7 Robert Sacre 679
9 Jim Dixon 666
10 Charlie Jordan 642
11 Jim Grady 634
12 Bill Quigg 630
13 Larry Brown 604
14 Frank Burgess 595
15 Joe Clayton 593

Career Assists Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Matt Santangelo 668
2 Blake Stepp 640
3 Jeremy Pargo 589
4 John Stockton 554
5 Kevin Pangos 536
6 Matt Bouldin 444
7 David Stockton 423
8 Derek Raivio 356
9 Steven Gray 339
10 Geoff Goss 335
11 Doug Spradley 324
12 Don Baldwin 313
13 Jim McPhee 304
14 Kyle Dixon 303
15 Dan Dickau 299
16 Jamie Dudley 293
17 Jeff Condill 284
18 Tim Wagoner 280
19 Gary Bell 265
20 Ken Tyler 255

Career Field Goals Made Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Frank Burgess 800
2 Jim McPhee 774
3 Adam Morrison 669
4 Elias Harris 666
5 Matt Santangelo 619
6 Jeff Brown 618
7 Casey Calvary 569
8 Kevin Pangos 566
9 Matt Bouldin 564
10 Ronny Turiaf 538
11 Richie Frahm 535
12 Cory Violette 522
13 Gary Lechman 515
14 John Stockton 514
15 Blake Stepp 498
16 Steven Gray 493
17 Sam Dower 490
18 Doug Spradley 462
19 Zach Gourde 460
20 Greg Sten 444

Career 3-Pointers Made Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Kevin Pangos 322
2 Blake Stepp 288
3 Richie Frahm 280
4 Matt Santangelo 252
5 Derek Raivio 243
6 John Rillie 230
7 Gary Bell 219
8 Steven Gray 210
9 Dan Dickau 188
10 Matt Bouldin 187
11 Kyle Bankhead 169
12 Jon Kinloch 157
13 Jarrod Davis 133
14 Adam Morrison 128
15 Doug Spradley 114
16 Micah Downs 111
17 Quentin Hall 100
18 Lorenzo Rollins 86
19 Drew Barham 85

Career Points Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Frank Burgess 2,196
2 Jim McPhee 2,015
3 Adam Morrison 1,867
4 Elias Harris 1,857
5 Kevin Pangos 1,824
6 Matt Santangelo 1,810
7 Ronny Turiaf 1,723
8 Matt Bouldin 1,683
9 Blake Stepp 1,670
10 Jeff Brown 1,646
11 Richie Frahm 1,621
12 Jerry Vermillion 1,547
13 Casey Calvary 1,509
14 Rich Evans 1,507
15 Derek Raivio 1,456
16 Gary Lechman 1,452
17 Steven Gray 1,432
18 Doug Spradley 1,427
19 Bill Suter 1,354
20 Cory Violette 1,342
21 John Stockton 1,340
22 Gary Bell 1,291
23 Sam Dower 1,271
24 Robert Sacre 1,270
25 Jeremy Pargo 1,245
26 Bill Wilson 1,226
27 Josh Heytvelt 1,172
28 Matt Stanford 1,171
29 Greg Sten 1,168
30 Zach Gourde 1,143
31 Dan Dickau 1,125
32 Jack Curran 1,121
33 Frank Walter 1,083
34 Jon Kinloch 1,071
35 Bryce McPhee 1,060
36 Jarrod Davis 1,054
37 John Rillie 1,038
38 Jeff Condill 1,004

Career Steals Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 John Stockton 262
2 Kevin Pangos 177
3 Jeremy Pargo 170
3 Matt Bouldin 170
5 David Stockton 167
6 Doug Spradley 159
7 Derek Raivio 158
8 Steven Gray 155
9 Blake Stepp 152
10 Geoff Goss 139
11 Tim Wagoner 131
12 Elias Harris 123
13 Jeff Condill 116
14 Matt Santangelo 115
15 Mike Nilson 112
16 Gary Bell 111
17 Quentin Hall 109
18 Cory Violette 101
19 Kyle Dixon 97
20 Mike Leasure 96

Career Blocked Shots Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Casey Calvary 207
2 Robert Sacre 186
3 Ronny Turiaf 179
4 Austin Daye 124
5 Przemek Karnowski 112
6 Tim Ruff 99
7 Josh Heytvelt 95
8 Zach Gourde 86
9 Cory Violette 85
10 Mark Spink 80
11 Abdullahi Kuso 77
12 Sam Dower 75
13 Paul Rogers 72
13 Elias Harris 72
15 Marc Armstead 70
16 Axel Dench 67
17 Brian Fredrickson 60
18 Dale Haaland 56
19 Scott Snider 54
20 Will Foster 53

Career Free Throws Made Leaders[edit]

Rank Player Total
1 Ronny Turiaf 643
2 Frank Burgess 596
3 Robert Sacre 451
4 Elias Harris 447
5 Jim McPhee 425
6 Gary Lechman 422
7 Adam Morrison 401
8 Jeff Brown 390
9 Doug Spradley 389
10 Blake Stepp 386
11 Kevin Pangos 370
12 Matt Bouldin 368
13 Derek Raivio 343
14 Matt Santangelo 320
15 John Stockton 312
16 Geoff Goss 303
17 Casey Calvary 289
18 Greg Sten 286
19 Dan Dickau 281
20 Richie Frahm 271
20 Sam Dower 271

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Works cited[edit]

  • Boling, Dave (2004). Tales From The Gonzaga Hardwood. New York: Sports Publishing LLC. ISBN 1582612722. 
  • Bradley, Bill (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York: Random House Digital, Inc. ISBN 0345513924. 
  • Withers, Bud (2002). BraveHearts: The Against-All-Odds Rise of Gonzaga Basketball. New York: Triumph Books. ISBN 1572434996. 

External links[edit]