Gonzalo Quesada

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For the Cuban diplomat, see Gonzalo de Quesada y Aróstegui.
Gonzalo Quesada
Date of birth (1974-05-02) May 2, 1974 (age 40)
Place of birth Buenos Aires, Argentina
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 88 kg (13 st 12 lb)
Rugby union career
Playing career
Position Fly-half
Professional / senior clubs
Years Club / team Caps (points)
-2000
2000-2002
2002-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
Hindú
Narbonne
Béziers
Stade Français
Pau
Toulon
Hindú


24
11
19
20


(214)
(41)
(108)
(177)
National team(s)
Years Club / team Caps (points)
1996-2003  Argentina 38 (486)
Coaching career
Years Club / team
2008-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-
France Assistant
Racing-Métro Assistant
Racing-Métro
Stade Français
Rugby union career

Gonzalo Quesada is an Argentine rugby player.

Biography[edit]

He was born May 2, 1974 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He won 39 caps playing at Fly-half for the Argentinian rugby union side between 1996 and 2003. He made his test debut at the age of 22 against the United States the 14 September 1996. He won his final cap the 26 October 2003 during the 2003 Rugby World Cup against Ireland. Argentina lost the match but Quesada scored 12 of Argentinas 15 points. He was the top points scorer at the 1999 Rugby World Cup in Wales, scoring 102 points. The English media nicknamed him Speedy Gonzalo due to the extraordinary length of time he took preparing to take kicks at goal.

Before the 1999 Rugby World Cup he played for Hindú Club in Argentina alongside the Fernández Miranda brothers Nicolas and Juan. After kicking 102 points at the 1999 Rugby World Cup (and finishing top point scorer of the entire tournament) he was invited to play for Racing Club de Narbonne Méditerannée in France. He left Narbonne in 2002 to sign for another French club, AS Béziers Hérault he then played for Stade Français with compatriots Pichot, Corleto and Hernández.

In 2005 he left Stade to join Pau but the club were relegated and he soon joined Toulon. In 2007 he returned to his former club Hindú.

External links[edit]


Awards
Preceded by
Argentina Andrea Noemí González
Olimpia de Oro
1999
Succeeded by
Argentina Las Leonas