Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

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Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson
Gonzoposter.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Alex Gibney
Narrated by Johnny Depp
Release dates
  • January 20, 2008 (2008-01-20) (Sundance Film Festival)
Running time 118 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson is a 2008 documentary film directed by Alex Gibney. It details Hunter S. Thompson's landmark writings on music and politics.[1] Friends and family (including Tom Wolfe and Ralph Steadman) provide interviews to help describe the mythos of Hunter and his life.

The film premiered on January 20 in the Documentary Competition at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival,[2] released in theaters in the U.S. on July 4, 2008, and on DVD on November 18, 2008.[3]

Release[edit]

The film was released in theaters in the US on the 4th of July 2008, and in the UK later that year. The DVD was released in November 2008. The film was premiered in January 2008 at the Sundance Film Festival.

Awards[edit]

The film was nominated for the Grand Jury prize in the documentary genre at the Sundance Film Festival, and for the Best Documentary Screenplay at the Writers' Guild of America awards in 2009.[4] In 2009 The Gonzo album notes, co-authored by Johnny Depp and Douglas Brinkley, were nominated for a Grammy award.[5]

Reception[edit]

The film received generally positive reviews, The Hollywood Reporter opining that "a biographical documentary doesn't get any better than this."[6] The New York magazine called the release "A tender, even-tempered elegy to a writer who at his peak could ingest staggering (literally) amounts of drugs and alcohol and transform, like Popeye after a can of spinach, into a superhuman version of himself-- more trenchant, more cutting, more hilarious than any political journalist before or since."[7]

Variety also praised the film, saying "subject's career being inextricably tied to two extremely entertaining U.S. decades, Gonzo has a wealth of delightful archival footage to draw on, both directly involving Thompson and evoking the cultural landscape around him.", and the film received positive reviews from Entertainment Weekly, the New York Times and the Chicago Sun-Times, amongst others. Rotten Tomatoes currently lists a 'Certified Fresh' rating with 86% of critics recommending the film.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]