Goobacks

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"Goobacks"
South Park episode
Goobacks scene.jpg
A "gooback" is almost hit by a car
Episode no. Season 8
Episode 6
Directed by Trey Parker
Written by Trey Parker
Production code 806
Original air date April 28, 2004
Episode chronology
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List of South Park episodes

"Goobacks" is the seventh episode of the eighth season of the animated television series South Park, and the 118th overall episode of the series. It originally aired on Comedy Central in the United States on April 28, 2004 and is rated TV-14-DLS in syndication for (D) Suggestive Dialogue, (L) for Strong language and (S) for sexual content. In the episode, people from a poverty-stricken future travel back in time to find work, affecting the town's economy and the employment of the original occupants.

"Goobacks" serves as a satire of illegal immigration, and mocks both sides of the debate concerning it.[1] The episode is widely remembered as the origin of the catchphrase "They took our jobs!"[2][3]

Plot[edit]

Early in the morning, a mysterious alien man appears in South Park, entering from some kind of portal. Unfamiliar with his surroundings, he is hit lightly by a car. After shovelling snow, Stan, Kyle, Cartman and Kenny watch a report on CNN about the mysterious arrival. The alien, who has come from over a thousand years in the future, is looking for work because of the overpopulation and poverty of his time, and he learns that the money that he earns in the 21st century will be enough to feed his family in 3045. Soon enough, large numbers of immigrants begin to come through the portal. The aliens are described by CNN as "a hairless, uniform mix of all races" with the same skin color, while their language is a guttural mixture of all world languages. As the boys return to offer to shovel snow again the next day, they find that the newly arrived time-immigrants have shoveled all driveways on the street for very low pay. As the immigrants are willing to accept jobs for that kind of pay, the original workers throughout South Park are fired, thus resulting in massive unemployment throughout the town.

At a meeting to discuss their concern with the immigrants, construction worker Darryl Weathers complains that they have worked hard to get their pay high enough to make a living, but now are being ousted by the time immigrants. The other workers voice their own complaints, with each sentence finishing off with an increasingly slurred and garbled exclamation of "They took our jobs!" ("Dey turk err jurbs," "Durker durr," etc), which later becomes their slogan. Later at that meeting, Weathers has the audience suggest ideas for stopping the immigrants from arriving at the town. One man suggests everyone stripping and engaging in an orgy; Weathers likes the idea, as it is the only way to stop the immigrants from coming because homosexual couples cannot spawn offspring. The protesters agree and begin the orgy.

Meanwhile, Stan's father Randy loses his job to an immigrant and becomes the spokesperson of the protesters. Randy is interviewed by CNN while still naked. Next to him is a very embarrassed and disturbed Stan, who explains that he understands that the immigrants are living in poverty and they are just trying to get by, but realizes that poor societies often hurt other societies instead of helping them. He suggests that the people of the present should try to make the future better so the immigrants will not need to come. The entire town begins to recycle, install solar and wind power devices, plant trees, give to the poor, etc., hoping to cause the Goobacks to disappear. Although the townspeople's efforts are successful and the Goobacks begin to fade away, the boys observe that the work is "gayer than all the men getting in a big pile and having sex with each other", and with an exclamation of "We're sorry, back in the pile!", the male adults including the boys resume their orgy.

External links[edit]

  • Goobacks Episode guide at South Park Studios

References[edit]

  1. ^ Travis Fickett (December 11, 2008). "South Park: 10 Great Moments in Diversity". IGN Entertainment, Inc. Retrieved 2014-05-06. 
  2. ^ Thomas Anderson (March 15, 2010). "12 Best ‘South Park’ Political Parodies". ScreenJunkies.com. Break Media. Retrieved 2014-05-06. 
  3. ^ Jim Schembri (April 28, 2011). "The Day the Immigrants Left, Wednesday, May 4". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2014-05-06.