Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center (Oregon)

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Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center
Samaritan Health Services
Good Samaritan Hospital Corvallis.JPG
Main building
Geography
Location 3600 NW Samaritan Drive, Corvallis, Oregon, United States
Coordinates 44°36′8″N 123°15′6″W / 44.60222°N 123.25167°W / 44.60222; -123.25167Coordinates: 44°36′8″N 123°15′6″W / 44.60222°N 123.25167°W / 44.60222; -123.25167
Organization
Care system Medicare/Medicaid/Charity
Hospital type Acute Care
Services
Emergency department Level II trauma center
Beds 188
History
Founded 1922
Links
Website www.samhealth.org/locations/goodsamaritanregionalmedicalcenter/Pages/default.aspx
Lists Hospitals in Oregon

Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center is a 188-bed medical facility located in Corvallis, Oregon, United States. The only hospital in the city, it is a level II trauma center, and serves the Linn, Benton, and Lincoln County area.

The hospital serves as the hub for the operations of Samaritan Health Services.[1] It is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations. A number of residencies are offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, including: family practice, internal medicine, psychiatry, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and cardiology.[2]

History[edit]

Started as Corvallis General Hospital, the original facility was located on Northwest Harrison Boulevard.[3] After World War II the hospital was on the brink of bankruptcy, unable to pay off its bonds. In an effort to retire the debt the hospital under the auspices of the Episcopal Diocese of Oregon.

In 1948, Corvallis General was reconstituted as a nonprofit organization and renamed Good Samaritan Hospital.[4] In 1975, the hospital moved to its current location north of the city overlooking Oregon Route 99W.[3] The hospital has maintained its affiliation with the Episcopal Diocese of Oregon and has continued to thrive. Now known as Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, today it is the flagship institution of Samaritan Health Services.[5] The original hospital building on Harrison was demolished in 2011.[3]

Operations[edit]

The medical center has 188 licensed beds, but only has 165 available, and is the only hospital in Benton County.[6] Services at the facility include maternity, surgery, radiology, heart and vascular services, pediatrics, mental health, an intensive care unit, oncology, laboratory services, neurology, dialysis, and emergency services, among others.[7] It is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO).[8]

The acute care facility is a level two trauma center and serves the entire county, plus portions of neighboring counties.[9] For 2012, the hospital had a total of 9,340 discharges, with 40,281 patient days, 4,095 surgeries, 1,073 births, and 18,658 emergency room visits.[10] That year it had $618 million in charges, provided $20.5 million in charity care, and had an operating loss of $3 million.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mid-valley Our Town 2006-2007, Samaritan Health Services Inc.". Retrieved 2008-09-05. [dead link]
  2. ^ "First graduating class of residents mark new phase for medical education". Samaritan Health Services. Jun 8, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Ceremony honors history of Corvallis General Hospital". Corvallis Gazette-Times. December 7, 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 
  4. ^ "Diocese Changes Hospital Name". The Oregonian. July 6, 1948. p. 12. 
  5. ^ Corvallis Gazette Times, Sept 8, 2006. "Father Charles Neville, who helped guide hospital, dies"
  6. ^ "Databank 2013". Health System Research and Data. Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "Contact Us". Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Samaritan Health Services. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 
  8. ^ "Good Samaritan Reg Med Center: Hospitals Directory". U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved 2008-09-05. 
  9. ^ "Oregon Trauma Hospitals" (PDF). Oregon Health Authority. April 3, 2013. p. 5. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "Databank 2012". Health System Research and Data. Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved 22 March 2014.