Good luck charm

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Good luck charm is a charm that is believed to bring good luck. An example of this is a blessing that a minister or a priest gives at the end of a ceremony. Later on, people assumed that spoken words were temporary whereas a solid object is more permanent. Objects that have extraordinary significance such as the splinter believed to be from the cross of Jesus Christ were substituted for the original spoken or sung charms.

Four leaf clover

Almost any object can be used as a charm. Coins and buttons are good examples.Little things that are given to you make very good lucky charms. It is because of the favorable associations they make. Many souvenir shops have a range of tiny items that may be used as good luck charms. Good luck charms are usually worn on the body although there are exceptions.[1]

History[edit]

The “lucky rabbit charm” was passed on and incorporated into American culture by African slaves that were brought to the Americas. The lucky bag or the “Mojo” is another borrowed idea from African culture. It is used in voodoo ceremonies to carry several lucky objects or spells and intended to cause a specific effect. The concept is that particular objects placed in the bag and charged will create a supernatural effect for the bearer. Even today, mojo bags are still used. Europe also contributed to the concept of lucky charms. Adherents of St. Patrick (the patron saint of Ireland), adopted the Four leaf clover as a symbol of Irish luck due to the fact that clovers are abundant in the hills of Ireland.[2]

A four-leaf clover was consistently believed to be a lucky charm. This very old Irish verse describes why:

One leaf is for fame,
And one leaf is for wealth,
And one is for a faithful lover,
And one to bring you glorious health,
Are all in the four-leaved clover.[1]

References[edit]