Goodall Cup

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Goodall Cup
The Goodall Cup resting on a Newcastle North Stars jersey in 2004 prior to the AIHL & Goodall Cup finals in September 2004.
Established 1909
Current holder(s) Sydney Ice Dogs
Awarded to the Team that wins the playoffs of the Australian Ice Hockey League

The Goodall Cup is the championship trophy of the Australian Ice Hockey League. The Goodall Cup has been contested as the national senior men's ice hockey trophy in Australia since 1909, making it the fifth oldest known ice hockey trophy still being awarded, after the Stanley Cup (1892; NHL Championship Cup), the Queen's Cup (1903; Ontario University Championship Cup), the Boyle Cup (1904; previously Newfoundland Senior Men's Cup and now Newfoundland High School Championship Cup), and the Allan Cup (1908; Canadian Senior Men's Amateur Championship Cup).

The Goodall Cup was traditionally an inter-state tournament, before it was incorporated into the Australian Ice Hockey League in 2002. New South Wales and Victoria were the original competitors and, between them, held the trophy until 1977 when Queensland won the cup.

The Goodall Cup has been competed for annually since 1909 with the following exceptions: 1914-1920 (World War I), 1940-1946 (World War II), 1955-1960 (closure of the Sydney Glaciarium) and 1993.

History[edit]

Inception[edit]

Ice hockey had been played in Australia at club level as early as 1909, when four Melbourne-based teams (Glaciarium, Beavers, Brighton and Melburnians) began play at Victoria's first ice rink, which opened in Melbourne that year. A similar rink had opened in Sydney the previous year, however it wasn't until 1909 that a New South Wales team was formed and sent to Melbourne to play the Victorians. Victoria lost the first of the three games but won the next two to take the series 2-1. In 1910, the Victorian team visited Sydney to take on New South Wales again. Among the Victorian players to make the trip was captain John Goodall, who had donated the trophy for the previous years interstate tournament.

New South Wales and Victoria would not play again until 1921 as World War I forced the closure of the Sydney rink (which reopened in 1920) and the abandonment of the 1914 season. New South Wales won the 1921 series with a far superior lineup which included Canadian Jimmy Kendall, who had previously turned down a cadetship with the Montreal Professional Club.

In 1922, the Victorians, captained by John Goodall, won back the Goodall Cup in what was considered an upset. It was the last time the Victorians won the Cup until 1947, and Goodall's last win of the cup that he had donated back in 1909.

Later Years[edit]

Despite losing the first Goodall Cup series, New South Wales would dominate for the next quarter-century, winning every series from 1923 to 1946, although the competition was placed on hiatus for the years of World War II (1939–1945).

The Goodall Cup remained an annual series between state associations until 2002, when the trophy became the prize given to the winners of the newly formed AIHL. The Sydney Bears won the first AIHL Goodall Cup that year. The Cup was withdrawn from the AIHL in 2009 by the cup's custodians, Ice Hockey Australia. It was instead awarded to South Australia in a traditional state vs state tournament held in Adelaide, South Australia in October 2009 as a 100 year celebration of the Goodall Cup.[1] In 2010 the Goodall Cup was offered back to the AIHL, and the cup accepted by a vote of the members and board. The Goodall Cup has been re-instated by the AIHL as its finals tournament trophy and as the prize signifying Australian champions of ice hockey. Adelaide Adrenaline, winners of the 2009 AIHL playoff were engraved into the cup and are also known as the 2009 Goodall Cup champions.[2]

Winners of the Goodall Cup[edit]

  • 1909 Victoria
  • 1910 Victoria
  • 1911 New South Wales
  • 1912 New South Wales
  • 1913 Victoria
  • 1914 Not played - World War I
  • 1915 Not played - World War I
  • 1916 Not played - World War I
  • 1917 Not played - World War I
  • 1918 Not played - World War I
  • 1919 Not played - World War I
  • 1920 Not played - World War I
  • 1921 New South Wales
  • 1922 Victoria
  • 1923 New South Wales
  • 1924 New South Wales
  • 1925 New South Wales
  • 1926 New South Wales
  • 1927 New South Wales
  • 1928 New South Wales
  • 1929 New South Wales
  • 1930 New South Wales
  • 1931 New South Wales
  • 1932 New South Wales
  • 1933 New South Wales
  • 1934 New South Wales
  • 1935 New South Wales
  • 1936 New South Wales
  • 1937 New South Wales
  • 1938 New South Wales
  • 1939 New South Wales
  • 1940 Not played - World War II
  • 1941 Not played - World War II
  • 1942 Not played - World War II
  • 1943 Not played - World War II
  • 1944 Not played - World War II
  • 1945 Not played - World War II
  • 1946 Not played - World War II
  • 1947 Victoria
  • 1948 New South Wales
  • 1949 Victoria
  • 1950 New South Wales
  • 1951 Victoria
  • 1952 Victoria
  • 1953 Victoria
  • 1954 Victoria
  • 1955 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1956 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1957 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1958 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1959 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1960 Not played - Closure of Sydney Glaciarium
  • 1961 Victoria
  • 1962 Victoria
  • 1963 New South Wales
  • 1964 New South Wales
  • 1965 Victoria
  • 1966 Victoria
  • 1967 Victoria
  • 1968 Victoria
  • 1969 New South Wales
  • 1970 New South Wales
  • 1971 New South Wales
  • 1972 Victoria
  • 1973 Victoria
  • 1974 Victoria
  • 1975 Victoria
  • 1976 Victoria
  • 1977 Queensland
  • 1978 Victoria
  • 1979 Victoria
  • 1980 New South Wales
  • 1981 New South Wales
  • 1982 Victoria
  • 1983 New South Wales
  • 1984 New South Wales
  • 1985 New South Wales
  • 1986 South Australia
  • 1987 South Australia
  • 1988 New South Wales
  • 1989 New South Wales
  • 1990 South Australia
  • 1991 South Australia
  • 1992 New South Wales
  • 1993 Not played
  • 1994 New South Wales
  • 1995 South Australia
  • 1996 New South Wales
  • 1997 South Australia
  • 1998 Australian Capital Territory
  • 1999 New South Wales
  • 2000 New South Wales
  • 2001 Sydney Bears
  • 2002 AIHL season Sydney Bears
  • 2003 AIHL season Newcastle North Stars
  • 2004 AIHL season West Sydney Ice Dogs
  • 2005 Newcastle North Stars
  • 2006 Newcastle North Stars
  • 2007 Penrith Bears

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "Goodall Cup 2009". Ice Hockey Australia. Archived from the original on 2010-04-08. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  2. ^ Lambert, Peter (2010-03-31). "AIHL Welcomes Back Goodall Cup". Australian Ice Hockey League. Archived from the original on 2010-04-13. Retrieved 2010-04-13.