Goodby, Silverstein & Partners

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Goodby, Silverstein & Partners
Type Subsidiary
Industry Advertising, Marketing, Design, Interactive, Media, Strategy
Founded 1983
Headquarters San Francisco, California
Area served Global
Key people

Founders:

Jeff Goodby
Rich Silverstein
Employees 300+ employees
Parent Omnicom Group Inc.
Website www.goodbysilverstein.com

Goodby, Silverstein & Partners (also known as GSP) is an advertising agency based in San Francisco.

History[edit]

The agency was founded in 1983 as Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein by Jeff Goodby, Andy Berlin and Rich Silverstein. Andy Berlin left in 1992 and the agency was renamed.[1] Goodby, Silverstein & Partners is now part of the Omnicom Group, Inc., an advertising holding company.[2] The agency is based in San Francisco, CA but in 2010 opened a Detroit, MI office to service its Chevrolet account[3] that they closed in 2013 when they lost the account.[4] They opened a New York, NY office in 2013.[5]

Notable campaigns[edit]

The firm supported the California Milk Processors Board and GSP initiated the Got Milk? campaign in 1993.[6][7] For Elizabeth Arden, GSP created Britney's fantasy reality to promote her Curious fragrance.[8]

During the 2010 Super Bowl, GSP premiered the promotion for everyone in America to receive a free grand slam on February 9, 2010.[9] Denny's ended up serving 2 million free Grand Slams as a result.[10]

As an off-shoot of the popular Budweiser Frogs campaign, GSP introduced the Budweiser Lizards, Frank and Louie, during the 1998 Super Bowl with the spot entitled, "Bad Day to be a Frog," in which the frogs were electrocuted by the jealous lizards.[11]

In 2006, Anhesuer-Busch purchased the Rolling Rock brand.[12] Rolling Rock loyalists began to boycott the beer.[13] GSP was tasked to resurrect the brand back to life. Feeding into the bad press, GSP created a fictional VP of Marketing for Rolling Rock, Ron Stablehorn, who promoted all the wrong things, including a "Beer Ape" that parachuted into beer-less parties.

Inspired by the famous Budweiser Clydesdales, this commercial came from the perspective of a donkey who always wanted to be a Clydesdale.[14] The spot was nominated in the Outstanding Commercial category for the 2004 Creative Arts Emmys.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Goodby Silverstein & Partners, Inc. - Company Profile, Information, Business Description, History, Background Information on Goodby Silverstein & Partners, Inc". Referenceforbusiness.com. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  2. ^ "Agency Family Trees 2010" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  3. ^ "Goodby's new Chevy ads to launch tonight as Detroit office ramps up". Crainsdetroit.com. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  4. ^ "Goodby's Split with GM's Commonwealth Confirmed". www.adweek.com. Retrieved 2014-06-24. 
  5. ^ "An Agency a Continent Away Expands to the Ad Capital". http://www.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2014-06-24. 
  6. ^ Advertising Educational Foundation. "got milk?". Aef.com. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  7. ^ "Aaron Burr Got Milk". The Inspiration Room. 2009-05-15. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  8. ^ "Britney Spears Fantasy Myth". The Inspiration Room. 2005-12-21. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  9. ^ "Denny’s Super Bowl 2010 Grand Slam Offer". The Inspiration Room. 2010-02-07. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  10. ^ Horovitz, Bruce (2009-02-03). "2 million enjoy free breakfast at Denny's". Usatoday.Com. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  11. ^ "Advertising > Animal Mascots > Budweiser Frogs (Anheuser-Busch)". Tv Acres. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  12. ^ "Anheuser-Busch buys Rolling Rock brands - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. 2006-05-20. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  13. ^ "Latrobe brewery's boosters calling for boycott - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. 2006-05-24. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 
  14. ^ [1][dead link]
  15. ^ "Born A Donkey - Budweiser". Emmys.com. Retrieved 2012-10-16. 

External links[edit]