Goodbye, Columbus (film)

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This article is about the film adaptation. For the original novel, see Goodbye, Columbus.
Goodbye, Columbus
Goodbye Columbus Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Larry Peerce
Produced by Stanley R. Jaffe
Screenplay by Arnold Schulman
Based on 1959 novella
Goodbye, Columbus 
by Philip Roth
Starring Richard Benjamin
Ali MacGraw
Jack Klugman
Nan Martin
Music by Charles Fox
Cinematography Enrique Bravo
Gerald Hirschfeld
Edited by Ralph Rosenblum
Production
  company
Willow Tree
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s)
  • April 3, 1969 (1969-04-03) (United States)
Running time 102 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1.5 million[1]
Box office $22,939,805[2]

Goodbye, Columbus is a 1969 American romantic comedy drama film starring Richard Benjamin and Ali MacGraw, directed by Larry Peerce and based on the novella of the same name by Philip Roth. The screenplay was written by Arnold Schulman who was awarded the Writers Guild of America Award.[3]

This was essentially MacGraw's film debut, as she had previously played a bit part in 1968's A Lovely Way to Die.

Plot[edit]

Neil Klugman (Richard Benjamin) is an intelligent, working class army veteran and graduate of Rutgers University who works as a library clerk. He falls for Brenda Patimkin (Ali MacGraw), a wealthy student at Radcliffe College who is home for the summer. They face obstacles from Brenda's family (particularly her mother), due to differences in class and assimilation into the American mainstream. Other conflicts include propriety and issues related to premarital sex and the possibility of pregnancy, and Mrs. Patimkin's envy of her daughter's youth.

Cast[edit]

  • Richard Benjamin as Neil Klugman
  • Ali MacGraw as Brenda Patimkin
  • Jack Klugman as Ben Patimkin
  • Nan Martin as Mrs. Ben Patimkin
  • Michael Meyers as Ron Patimkin
  • Lori Shelle as Julie Patimkin
  • Monroe Arnold as Uncle Leo
  • Kay Cummings as Doris Klugman
  • Sylvie Strause as Aunt Gladys
  • Ilona Simon as Gloria Feldman

Reception[edit]

Box-office[edit]

The film earned an estimated $10.5 million in rentals at the North American box office, making it one of the most popular movies of the year.[4]

Critical response[edit]

When the film was released the staff at Variety magazine lauded the film, writing, "This adaptation of Philip Roth's National Book Award-winning novella is sometimes a joy in striking a boisterous mood, and otherwise handling action. Castwise the feature excels. Richard Benjamin as the boy, a librarian after serving in the army, and Ali MacGraw, making her screen bow as the daughter of wealthy and socially-conscious parents, offer fresh portrayals seasoned with rich humor. Their romance develops swiftly after their meeting at a country-club pool."[5]

The New York Times film critic, Vincent Canby, liked the film but was annoyed that it strayed from Roth's work, "Thus, at its center, Goodbye, Columbus is sharp and honest. However, the further they are removed from the main situation, the more the subsidiary characters, lightly sketched in the novella, become overstuffed, blintz-shaped caricatures. Jack Klugman and Nan Martin, as Brenda's parents, are very nice, but Michael Meyers, as her huge, empty-headed brother ('so exceedingly polite,' Mr. Roth observed in the novella, 'that it seemed to be some affliction of those over six foot three') borders on a cartoon figure. Also, I somehow resent the really vulgar manners that Mr. Peerce allows his middle-class Jews—especially at an elaborate wedding reception—not because of any particular bias, but because it is gross moviemaking. These reservations, however, become academic. Goodbye, Columbus is so rich with understanding in more important ways that it is a thing of real and unusual pleasure.[6]

Film critic Dennis Schwartz praised the film as well, writing, "Philip Roth's prize-winning novella, a scathing satire of a nouveau riche Jewish family, has been brilliantly adapted for the screen by Arnold Schulman (received an Academy nomination) and directed by Larry Peerce (his father is the great opera singer Jan Peerce). Somehow it slipped under the radar and as far as I'm concerned is both funnier and more perceptive than even The Graduate, an earlier drama about young adults."[7]

Accolades[edit]

Wins

Nominations

Soundtrack[edit]

A vinyl LP record of the film's score was released in 1969 by Warner Bros. Records and a compact disc was released in 2006 by Collector's Choice Music.[8]

Three songs in the soundtrack were written and performed by members of The Association: "Goodbye, Columbus" (Jim Yester), "It's Gotta Be Real" (Larry Ramos), and "So Kind To Me" (Terry Kirkman).[9]

Track listing[edit]

  • 1. Goodbye, Columbus [Vocal Version]
  • 2. How Will I Know You?
  • 3. Dartmouth? Dartmouth!
  • 4. Goodbye, Columbus [Instrumental]
  • 5. Ron's Reverie: Across the Field/Carmen Ohio
  • 6. It's Gotta Be Real
  • 7. A Moment to Share
  • 8. Love Has a Way
  • 9. A Time for Love
  • 10. So Kind to Me (Brenda's Theme)
  • 11. Goodbye, Columbus

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solomon, Aubrey (1989). Twentieth Century Fox: A Corporate and Financial History. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press, p. 163, ISBN 978-0-8108-4244-1.
  2. ^ "Goodbye, Columbus, Box Office Information". The Numbers. Retrieved May 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ Goodbye, Columbus at the American Film Institute Catalog.
  4. ^ "Big Rental Films of 1969", Variety, 7 January 1970 p 15.
  5. ^ Variety. Staff film review, April 3, 1969. Last accessed: February 19, 2011.
  6. ^ Canby, Vincent. The New York Times, film review, April 4, 1969. Last accessed: February 19, 2011.
  7. ^ Schwartz, Dennis. Ozus' World Movie Reviews, film review, June 29, 2005. Last accessed: February 19, 2011.
  8. ^ Goodbye, Columbus at SoundTrack Collector web site. Last accessed: February 19, 2011.
  9. ^ IMDb, Soundtrack Section. Last accessed: February 19, 2011.

External links[edit]