Goodlettsville, Tennessee

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Goodlettsville, Tennessee
City
Location of Goodlettsville, Tennessee
Location of Goodlettsville, Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°19′37″N 86°42′15″W / 36.32694°N 86.70417°W / 36.32694; -86.70417Coordinates: 36°19′37″N 86°42′15″W / 36.32694°N 86.70417°W / 36.32694; -86.70417
Country United States
State Tennessee
Counties Davidson, Sumner
Government
 • Mayor John Coombs
 • Vice Mayor Jane Birdwell
Area
 • Total 14.3 sq mi (37.1 km2)
 • Land 14.1 sq mi (36.6 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation 476 ft (145 m)
Population (2013)Estimate
 • Total 16,813
 • Density 1,200/sq mi (450/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 37070, 37072
Area code(s) 615
FIPS code 47-29920[1]
GNIS feature ID 1285638[2]
Website www.cityofgoodlettsville.org

Goodlettsville is a city in Davidson and Sumner counties, Tennessee. Goodlettsville was incorporated as a city in 1958 with a population of just over 3,000 residents; at the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 15,921[3] and in 2013 the population was 16,813. Goodlettsville chose to remain autonomous in 1963 when the city of Nashville merged with the government of Davidson County. Therefore, Goodlettsville is only governed by the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County in a limited manner.

Geography[edit]

Goodlettsville is located at 36°19′37″N 86°42′15″W / 36.32694°N 86.70417°W / 36.32694; -86.70417 (36.326968, -86.704285).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.3 square miles (37.1 km2), of which 14.1 square miles (36.6 km2) are land and 0.15 square miles (0.4 km2), or 1.20%, is water.[5]

History[edit]

Goodlettsville was named for A. G. Goodlett, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church from 1848 to 1853.[6]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 3,163
1970 6,168 95.0%
1980 8,327 35.0%
1990 11,219 34.7%
2000 13,780 22.8%
2010 15,921 15.5%
Est. 2012 16,415 3.1%
Sources:[7][8]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 13,780 people, 5,601 households, and 3,825 families residing in the city. The population density was 986.5 people per square mile (380.9/km²). There were 5,853 housing units at an average density of 419.0 per square mile (161.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 86.42% White, 9.83% African American, 0.22% Native American, 1.64% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 1.23% from two or more races. 1.48% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,601 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.7% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,690, and the median income for a family was $54,159. Males had a median income of $40,567 versus $27,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,946. 9.4% of the population and 7.5% of families were below the poverty line. 18.1% of those under the age of 18 and 5.1% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Schools and education[edit]

Goodlettsville's Davidson County portion has two elementary schools and one middle school: Goodlettsville Elementary School, Gateway Elementary School, and Goodlettsville Middle School. Goodlettsville schools feed into Metro Nashville Schools' Hunters Lane cluster, meaning that students tend to move from Goodlettsville Middle School to Hunters Lane High School upon completion of 8th grade and promotion to 9th grade.

On the Sumner County side of the line, the only school within the city limits is Madison Creek Elementary School, which feeds to Hunter Middle School and Beech Senior High School in Hendersonville. A portion of the city is zoned for Millersville Elementary, which feeds White House Middle and High Schools.

Goodlettsville residents on the Sumner County side have the option of sending students to Sumner County's Merrol Hyde Magnet School, if the students meet its criteria. Furthermore, residents on the Davidson County side have the opportunity to send students to Head Magnet Middle School, which feeds to Martin Luther King Jr. Academic Magnet, or Meigs Magnet Middle which feeds to Hume Fogg Academic High School. Both Meigs and Head have academic requirements.

Little League World Series[edit]

A little league team from Goodlettsville participated in the 2012 Little League World Series in Williamsport, PA where they won the United States Championship and played their winner of the international teams for the Little League World Series title. They were the fifth team from Tennessee to qualify in series history, and the first to play in the championship game. They lost to a team from Tokyo, Japan in the finals. Nevertheless, they were the first Tennessee team to qualify since 1987. As tournament runners-up, they were the most successful Tennessee team since 1985. They were the first to win at least two consecutive games since 1974. And, they were the first Nashville area team to qualify since 1970. It was only the second year for little league baseball in Goodlettsville.

Government[edit]

Goodlettsville operates a separate governmental entity than that of the Metropolitan Nashville Government. It operates as a satellite city of the Metropolitan Nashville Government. Goodlettsville's governing body is the Board of Commissioners, made up of five members elected at-large. The five members then select a Mayor and Vice-Mayor within themselves, much like a board selects a chair and vice-chair. The current mayor is John Coombs, vice-mayor is Jane Birdwell, and the other three city commissioners are Harry Bell, Zach Young, and Jeff Duncan. The Goodlettsville City Commission is elected to serve four year, alternating terms. Elections are held every two years.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Goodlettsville city, Tennessee". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Goodlettsville city, Tennessee". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  6. ^ Robert S. Brandt, Touring Middle Tennessee Backroads, John F. Blair, Publisher, 1 Jul 1995, p. 6 [1]
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-03-04. 
  8. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  9. ^ City of Goodlettsville

External links[edit]