Goodyear, Arizona

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Goodyear, Arizona
City
South Lake Park in Estrella, on the southern end of Goodyear
South Lake Park in Estrella, on the southern end of Goodyear
Official seal of Goodyear, Arizona
Seal
Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona
Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 33°27′00″N 112°21′30″W / 33.45000°N 112.35833°W / 33.45000; -112.35833Coordinates: 33°27′00″N 112°21′30″W / 33.45000°N 112.35833°W / 33.45000; -112.35833
Country USA
State Arizona
County Maricopa
Government
 • Mayor Georgia Lord
Area
 • Total 301.6 km2 (116.5 sq mi)
 • Land 301.6 km2 (116.5 sq mi)
 • Water 0 km2 (0 sq mi)
Elevation 295 m (968 ft)
Population (2010)
 • Total 65,275
 • Density 62.7/km2 (162.3/sq mi)
Time zone MST (no DST) (UTC-7)
ZIP code 85338, 85395
Area code(s) 623
FIPS code 04-28380
Website http://www.ci.goodyear.az.us/

Goodyear (O'odham: Valin Thak) is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States. It is a suburb of Phoenix and is in the Phoenix metropolitan area. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city is 65,275. Goodyear was the third fastest-growing place among all cities and towns in Arizona of any size between 1990 and 2000 (with an increase of 245.2%). The July 1, 2011 population estimate was 66,309, with an increase of 1.6%.[1]

The city is home to the Goodyear Ballpark, where the Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds of the MLB practice their spring training. On June 6, 2008, Goodyear won the All-America City Award, sponsored by the National Civic League. The city is named after the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, when the company had farmland to grow cotton for their tires.

History[edit]

Goodyear was established in 1917 with the purchase of 16,000 acres (65 km2) of land by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company to cultivate cotton for vehicle tire threads. World War II was important to Goodyear in the 1940s as the current Phoenix Goodyear Airport was built, but after the war, the economy suffered. Goodyear became a town on November 19, 1946.[2] At the time, it had 151 homes and 250 apartments, a grocery store, a barber shop, beauty shop and a gas station.

In January 1965, a harness racing track opened. At the time, there was no Interstate 10 or any major roads from Phoenix to Goodyear for access to the track. It closed under two years later, but still stands, and has not been used since then. It is located south of Interstate 10 and is clearly visible from the freeway.

The town became a city in 1985. In the same decade, the remaining 10,000 acres (40 km2) of the original farmland was sold for future development. The Phoenix Goodyear Airport received its current name in 1986.[3]

Throughout the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s, new homes and communities brought the population increasing rapidly. Goodyear continues to grow as more communities and homes are continuing to be built. Goodyear's population is projected to be 358,000 by 2035.[4]

Geography[edit]

Goodyear is located at 33°27′00″N 112°21′30″W / 33.45000°N 112.35833°W / 33.45000; -112.35833 (33.449917, -112.358382).[5] Nearby cities include Avondale, Litchfield Park, Tolleson and Buckeye. Goodyear is about 17 miles (27 km) west of downtown Phoenix.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 116.5 square miles (302 km2), all of it land. The Gila River passes through the city. The largest master planned community is Estrella,[6] south of the Gila River, located near the Estrella Mountains.

The Estrella Mountain Regional Park covers almost 20,000 acres (31 sq mi), which most of that area is still desert. It contains eight trails over 30 mi (48 km) in length combined, two baseball fields, and a 9.5 mi (15.3 km) track.[7]

Climate[edit]

Goodyear has a subtropical desert climate (Köppen: BWh) due to its location in the Sonoran Desert. The city receives over ten inches of rain annually. However, the city receives over 300 sunny days per year.

Winters are mild and temperate, with lows in the upper 30s to the lower 50s and highs ranging from 60 to 75. Spring is warm with highs easily going over 90 in April and 100 in May. Summers are very hot, with many of the days with highs over 110. Falls are still very warm, with temperatures commonly going over 90 in October.

Snow is rare in the area, occurring once every several years. Lows in the winter occasionally dip below freezing, which may damage some desert plants such as saguaros and other cacti. In the summer (mainly July, August and early September), the North American Monsoon can hit the Phoenix area in the afternoon and evening (possibly continuing overnight), causing rain showers even from a sunny morning. Dust storms are occasional, mainly during the summer.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 1,200
1960 1,600 33.3%
1970 2,000 25.0%
1980 3,137 56.9%
1990 6,000 91.3%
2000 18,911 215.2%
2010 65,275 245.2%
source:[4]

2010 Census[edit]

As of 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that there were 65,275 people residing in the city. 71.9% of the city's population was White, 6.7% were Black, 1.3% were Native American, and 4.3% were Asian. 27.8% were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 25,027 housing units in the city.[8] 31% of the population is between ages 35 and 49.

2000 Census[edit]

As of 2000, there were 18,911 people, 6,179 households, and 4,986 families residing in the city. The population density was 162.4 people per square mile (62.7/km²). There were 6,771 housing units at an average density of 58.1 per square mile (22.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 78.13% White, 5.20% African American, 1.06% Native American, 1.71% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 10.87% from other races, and 2.95% from two or more races. 20.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,179 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.1% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.3% were non-families. 14.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 34.1% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $57,492, and the median income for a family was $60,707. Males had a median income of $40,702 versus $28,410 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,506. About 3.6% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Goodyear has a council-manager form of government. The current mayor is Georgia Lord (with a term from 2009-2013). The vice mayor of the city is Joanne Osborne (with a term from 2011-2015). The mayor has a two-term limit. There are six councilmembers with three-term limits.[9]

The Arizona Department of Corrections operates the Arizona State Prison Complex-Perryville in Goodyear.[10] The prison houses the female death row.[11]

Education[edit]

Several school districts serve the city of Goodyear. Elementary school districts include Avondale Elementary School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Mobile Elementary School District. High school districts include Agua Fria Union High School District and Buckeye Union High School District.[12]

Elementary/Middle schools[edit]

[13][14]

  • Mabel Padgett Elementary School
  • Palm Valley Elementary School
  • Desert Star Elementary School
  • Copper Trails Elementary School
  • Desert Thunder Elementary School
  • Estrella Mountain Elementary School
  • Westar Elementary School
  • Western Sky Middle School
  • Wildflower Elementary School

High schools[edit]

[15]

  • Millenium High School
  • Desert Edge High School
  • Estrella Foothills High School

Colleges and universities[edit]

There is only one campus in the city, a Franklin Pierce University campus, after the New Hampshire-based university signed a lease with the city to purchase 30 acres (120,000 m2) of land, existing since 2008.[16] It offers a Doctor of Physical Therapy program and other health care related programs.[17]

Economy[edit]

Goodyear is known as a bedroom community, while it is a developing residential suburb of Phoenix. More new homes are being built in master-planned communities.

Goodyear Centerpointe is a shopping center located on the intersection of Estrella Parkway and McDowell Road. Toys R Us, Old Navy, Party City and several other stores are located there. The future Estrella Falls Regional Mall will be more than 300 acres (0.47 sq mi) large and bring 2,000,000 square feet (190,000 m2) of shopping. It includes The Market at Estrella Falls Power Center and the Estrella Falls Super Regional Mall.[18]

Agriculture, like the Imperial Valley in Southern California and a lot of southern Arizona, is common in the area, and has been for a long time because of irrigation and canals. Cotton and vegetables such as lettuce, cabbage, and spinach are mainly grown on farms. The climate is also good for growing citrus fruits and oranges.

Due to Goodyear's long history of farming, it brought food companies to the city, such as Snyder's of Hanover, Poore Brothers and Del Monte Foods.[19] Amazon.com has a fulfillment center in the city, as well as in nearby Phoenix.

Housing[edit]

Goodyear was founded back in 1917, but the majority of construction and population growth was after 1995. 22 communities that are completed and under construction have a total area of approximately 20,000 acres (31 sq mi). These communities, along with another 21 communities for future suburban development, will contain almost 200,000 homes, with only 25,000 built.[20]

Goodyear, as well as other Arizona cities, got affected in the 2000s American housing bubble, reducing home values.

Estrella is the largest community in Goodyear, at 20,000 acres (31 sq mi) large. The community is home to about 10,000 residents. Palm Valley, located north of Interstate 10, is 9,000 acres (14 sq mi) large, with variously-sized homes. PebbleCreek is a community for active adult living, with 45 holes of championship golf, fitness centers, and restaurants.

Sports[edit]

Goodyear Ballpark

Goodyear is known for its spring training sessions. The Cleveland Indians of baseball's American League moved their spring training facility to Goodyear from Winter Haven, Florida and rejoined the Cactus League in February 2009, after a 15-year absence. Before that, the Indians held spring training for many years in Tucson. On April 7, 2008, Goodyear's city council unanimously approved a memorandum to fund a new $33 million baseball spring training complex for Major League Baseball's Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians. This includes a 10,000-seat park, Goodyear Ballpark that opened in 2009. The Reds and the Indians will have separate offices, clubhouses and practice fields. The Indians, who had held their spring training in Tucson for many years until moving to Winter Haven in 1993, agreed to return their spring training location back to Arizona on December 21, 2006.

The Goodyear Centennials of the Freedom Pro Baseball League play their home games at the Goodyear Ballpark. Two other baseball teams in the Arizona League, the Arizona League Indians and the Arizona League Reds, also play at the stadium.

Transportation[edit]

Air[edit]

There is an airport, which is the Phoenix Goodyear Airport (ICAO code: KGYR).

Rail[edit]

Union Pacific operates a railroad that goes through Goodyear.

Road transport[edit]

Interstate 10 goes through Goodyear, heading west to Buckeye and Los Angeles. I-10 heads east to Phoenix, Tucson, and the Southern states.

The city is also served by the western ends of several bus routes of the Valley Metro Bus.[21]

Other roads and highways serve the area. Loop 303 starts as Cotton Lane then heads up north to Surprise and then to Interstate 17. Van Buren Street, McDowell, Indian School and Camelback Roads are major arterial roads leading from the extreme western Phoenix area to past Scottsdale, in the east. MC 85 (Maricopa County Highway 85) is a highway running from Arizona State Route 85 in Buckeye to central Phoenix. The highway passes the southern sections of Goodyear.

Road improvements[edit]

Interstate 10 was built through Goodyear in the mid 20th-century. Between 2008 and 2012, the road had significant expansions. It was expanded from 2 lanes in each direction to 5 or 6 (including one HOV lane starting near Estrella Parkway going east).

Loop 303 improvement[edit]

The Arizona Department of Transportation is building a new interchange near the Interstate 10/Loop 303 junctions. The interchange is becoming a stack interchange from a diamond interchange. As a result, Loop 303 under Interstate 10 has been cleared, and Exit 124 on Interstate 10 has been shut down; the new interchange is under construction. The I-10/Loop 303 interchange is expected to be completed in 2014.

South of Interstate 10, Loop 303 is being planned to extend to a future State Route 30.[22]

State Route 801[edit]

Arizona State Route 801 is a proposed highway south of Interstate 10 that will relieve traffic congestion. It is planned to run between Arizona State Route 85 to Loop 202.[23]

Notable people from Goodyear[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Goodyear (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Goodyear at a Glance". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - History". Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Demographics and Growth". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ http://www.estrella.com/interactivemap.aspx
  7. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Attractions - Goodyear Area". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Goodyear city, Arizona QuickLinks from the US Census Bureau". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Mayor and Council". Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Arizona State Prison Complex- Perryville." Arizona Department of Corrections. Retrieved on August 16, 2010.
  11. ^ "Death Row Information and Frequently Asked Questions." Arizona Department of Corrections. Retrieved on August 16, 2010.
  12. ^ "Schools & Education." City of Goodyear. Retrieved on March 24, 2009.
  13. ^ "Schools". Retrieved December 16, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Liberty Elementary SD 25 - AZ - Liberty Home". Retrieved December 16, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Agua Fria Union High School District - Agua Fria Union High School District Home". Retrieved December 16, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Education". Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Franklin Pierce University in Goodyear Arizona - Franklin Pierce University". Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Estrella Falls Regional Mall". Retrieved December 22, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Industry". Retrieved December 22, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Goodyear, AZ - Official Website - Housing". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  21. ^ Transit Book. Valley Metro (Phoenix). July 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-26. 
  22. ^ "Loop 303 South of I-10". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  23. ^ "Valley Freeways (State Route 801)". Retrieved December 18, 2012. 

External links[edit]