Goofing off

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Goofing off is a slang term in the United States for engaging in recreation or an idle pastime while obligations of work or society are neglected. Common obligations neglected in the course of goofing off include schoolwork, paid employment, social courtesies and the expectations of relations. Goofing off at school is considered to be a regular behaviour, which is engaged in by all students at one time or another.[1]

When goofing off occurs within the classroom, teachers can resolve the matter quickly by direct confrontation.[2] Employers may use wage premiums to discourage goofing off by their employees, although it is suggested that the effects of such incentives causes aging to have a negative effect upon earnings sooner than would be otherwise expected.[3] Goofing off has been shown to improve work or study in the right environments, and can relieve stress.[4][5] It may be a form of creativity and experimentation, providing useful learning experiences and discoveries.[6]

Some research has indicated that women tend to feel more guilt than men about taking time for themselves and so use breaks to become more organized.[7]

Perhaps the most famous example of goofing off is the tale reported by Suetonius of Nero fiddling while Rome burned. Although commonly retold, it is untrue.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Everhart (Spring 1982), "The Nature of "Goofing Off" among Junior High School Adolescents", Adolescence 17 (65): 177–88 
  2. ^ John P. Fields, Classroom Management and Conflict Resolution: From "Goofing Off" to Violence in the Classroom (PDF) 
  3. ^ Kenneth V. Greene (October 1979), "Goofing off, Aging and Earnings", Southern Economic Journal (Southern Economic Association) 46 (2): 623–627, doi:10.2307/1057434, JSTOR 1057434 
  4. ^ http://www.entrepreneur.com/blog/224678
  5. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/29/living/play-at-work-irpt/
  6. ^ Lara Honos-Webb (2005), The Gift of ADHD, Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, p. 105, ISBN 1-57224-389-9 
  7. ^ Cynthia R. Shuster (2001), "Take Five:" Simplify (PDF), Ohio State University 
  8. ^ The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero
  9. ^ Mary Francis Gyles (Jan 1947), "Nero Fiddled while Rome Burned", The Classical Journal 42 (4): 211–217 

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