Goran Lozanovski

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Goran Lozanovski
Personal information
Full name Goran Lozanovski
Date of birth (1974-01-11) 11 January 1974 (age 41)
Place of birth Melbourne, Australia
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
Altona Magic
1990–1991 AIS
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1991–1993 Preston Makedonia 18 (1)
1993–1996 Adelaide City 86 (7)
1996–1997 Collingwood Warriors 17 (0)
1997–2001 South Melbourne 97 (15)
2001–2002 Alemannia Aachen 12 (0)
2002–2003 Adelaide City 29 (4)
2003–2004 Adelaide United 14 (0)
2004 Western Strikers 12 (6)
2005 Heidelberg United 8 (0)
2005–2008 Preston Lions 2 (0)
National team
1993 Australia U-20
1996 Australia U-23
1996–1998 Australia 9 (0)
Teams managed
2007–2008 Preston Lions
2008–2009 Hume City FC
2010-2011 Bentleigh Greens
2011-2012 Northcote City FC (Asst.)
2012—present Northcote City FC
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 12 May 2007.
† Appearances (Goals).

Goran Lozanovski (born 11 January 1974) is a former Australian football (soccer) player of Macedonian descent, and current manager of Northcote City in the Victorian NPL Mens 1.

Playing career[edit]

Club[edit]

Noted for his ability at taking set pieces, Lozanovski signed with South Melbourne in 1997 under Ange Postecoglou, where he would go on to win 2 National Soccer League grand finals in both the 1997-1998, and 1998-1999 seasons. In the 1999 Grand Final against Sydney United, Lozanovski was awarded the prestigious Joe Marston Medal in South Melbourne's 3-2 victory.[1]

Lozanovski's success at South Melbourne paved the way for him to link up with fellow Socceroo Mark Rudan at then-2. Bundesliga club Alemannia Aachen. However, his stay at the club would last only 12 games after being embroiled in the 'suitcase affair' corruption scandal in 2001, after financial irregularities arose following both Australian players transfers to the club.[2] After Rudan was briefly arrested by German authorities over the scandal,[3] charges were laid on the clubs treasurer Bernd Krings, who was convicted of financial fraud.[4] Both Lozanovski and Rudan were eventually cleared, with both players departing the club shortly after.

Returning home, Lozanovski had stints in South Australia with Adelaide City, Adelaide United, and Western Strikers during the dying years of the National Soccer League. He saw out his career in the Victorian State Leagues with Heidelberg United and Preston Lions respectively, where he retired in 2008.

Managerial[edit]

Following his retirement, Lozanovski immediately took up a head coaching position at Preston Lions. He would go on to briefly coach both Hume City, and his 2013 Grand Final opponents, Bentleigh Greens before joining Northcote City. During the 2012 season at Northcote, Lozanovski was promoted to head coach, following Peter Tsolakis' departure to South Melbourne.[5]

In 2013, Lozanovski took Northcote FC to their first ever Victorian Premier League Championship, defeating Bentleigh Greens in which would be the last season of the Victorian Premier League system, before it was re-branded into the National Premier Leagues Victoria.[6]

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Australia South Melbourne FC

Manager[edit]

Victoria (Australia) Northcote FC

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clark, Alan (1999). "Grand Final report by Alan Clark South Melbourne v Sydney United". OzFootball.net. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  2. ^ Schumacher, Wolfgang (6 November 2002). "Anklage gegen Ex-Alemannen Rudan" (in German). Aachener Nachrichten. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 
  3. ^ McDermott, Quentin (27 May 2002). "Final Whistle?". ABC TV. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "Geldkoffer-Prozess: Frano Zelic entlastet Bernd Krings" (in German). Alemannia Aachen. 21 October 2003. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 
  5. ^ Pollock, Tom (28 March 2013). "Lozanovski hopes old school approach will deliver success". MFootball.com.au. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  6. ^ "Northcote defeat Bentleigh to win VPL crown". FourFourTwo Australia. 19 October 2014. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 

External links[edit]