Goran Marković (film director)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Goran Marković (Serbian: Горан Марковић) (born August 24, 1946, Belgrade, Serbia, Yugoslavia) is a Serbian movie and theatre director, screenwriter, and playwright. He has directed approximately 50 documentaries, 11 movies and 3 theatre plays and has written three books.

Career[edit]

Marković was born in Belgrade to Rade and Olivera Marković, both established Serbian actors. He finished 5th Belgrade Gymnasium prior to attending FAMU at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague.

Marković is the winner of more than 30 Yugoslavian, Serbian, and international film and theatre awards, the most significant of them being two Pula festival "Zlatna arena" awards, an award for the best director at the San Sebastian Film Festival for the film "Tito and Me", Grand Prix of Americas at the Montreal World Film Festival for the movie "Kordon"[1] and Sterija's Award for the best modern drama text for the theatre play "Turneja". The film version of Turneja won both "Best Film" and "Best Scenario" at the 2009 European Film Festival in Kiev[2] as well as Best Director and the Fipresci awards at the Montreal World Film Festival.[3]

A consistent opponent of the Milosević regime, Marković expressed his political stance in three post-1995 documentary films produced or co-produced with Radio B92: Crazy People (1997), Ordinary Heroes (2000) and Serbia, Year Zero (2001).[4]

Marković is also a professor at Belgrade Faculty of Dramatic Arts[1] and is a member of the European Film Academy in Brussels.

Filmography[edit]

Feature films[edit]

Documentaries[edit]

  • Neobavezno (1970), TV series documentary in two installments
  • Glumci (1973), TV series documentary in two installments
  • Junaci (1976), TV series documentary in five installments
  • Poludeli ljudi (1997)
  • Nevažni junaci (1999)
  • Serbie, année zéro (2001)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Reveler, Norma (8 September 2003). "'Cordon' Takes Ribbon at Montreal". Boston Globe. Retrieved 6 May 2010. 
  2. ^ "A film by Serbian director won the main prize...". BSSANA News. 5 June 2009. Retrieved 6 May 2010. 
  3. ^ "Inuit story audience favourite at Montreal World Film Festival". CBC.ca. 2 September 2008. Retrieved 6 May 2010. 
  4. ^ Daniel J. Goulding, "Liberated Cinema: The Yugoslav Experience, 1945-2001", 189.

External links[edit]