Gord Mackintosh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Honourable
Gord Mackintosh

MLA, BA, MA, LLB
Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Consumer Affairs
Incumbent
Assumed office
November 3, 2009
Premier Greg Selinger
Preceded by new portfolio
Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Housing
In office
September 21, 2006 – November 3, 2009
Premier Gary Doer
Preceded by Christine Melnick
Succeeded by portfolio abolished
Manitoba Minister of Justice and Attorney General
In office
October 5, 1999 – September 21, 2006
Premier Gary Doer
Preceded by Vic Toews
Succeeded by David Chomiak
Manitoba Government House Leader
In office
October 5, 1999 – September 21, 2006
Premier Gary Doer
Preceded by Darren Praznik
Succeeded by David Chomiak
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba
Incumbent
Assumed office
September 21, 1993
Preceded by Judy Wasylycia-Leis
Constituency St. Johns
Personal details
Born Gordon Henry Alexander Mackintosh
(1955-07-07) July 7, 1955 (age 59)
Fort Frances, Ontario
Political party New Democratic Party
Alma mater University of Manitoba

Gordon Henry Alexander "Gord" Mackintosh (born July 7, 1955) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada.[1][2] He is currently a cabinet minister in the New Democratic Party government of Greg Selinger.[1]

Mackintosh was born in Fort Frances, Ontario, and was educated at the University of Manitoba.[2] He trained as a lawyer, and was called to the bar in 1988.

Mackintosh worked for the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the Manitoba Human Rights Commission[3] between 1979 and 1984, and also worked as Deputy Clerk of the Manitoba legislature[3] from 1980 to 1984. He was chair of the Patient's Rights Committee[3] from 1986 to 1992, and was a member of the Rainbow Society and the Manitoba Anti-Poverty Organization. In his legal career, he specialized in environmental issues, and was also an assistant to Elijah Harper during the Meech Lake constitutional debates of 1990.[3]

Mackintosh entered provincial politics in September 1993, winning a by-election in the north Winnipeg riding of St. Johns (replacing Judy Wasylycia-Leis, who resigned to run for the federal House of Commons).[4] Mackintosh won 3232 votes, compared to 878 for his nearest opponent, Liberal Naty Yenkech.

In the provincial election of 1995, Mackintosh was re-elected in St. Johns with 4513 votes, against 1610 for Liberal Bron Gorski. The general election was won by Gary Filmon's Progressive Conservatives, and Mackintosh joined 22 other New Democrats in the official opposition.

The New Democrats won the election of 1999,[5] and Mackintosh was easily re-elected in his own riding. On October 5, he was appointed Minister of Justice, Attorney General and Keeper of the Great Seal with responsibility for Constitutional Affairs, and was also named NDP House Leader. On January 17, 2001, he was charged with responsibility for the Manitoba Public Insurance Corporation Act.

As Attorney General, Mackintosh oversaw the extension of children's rights in the legal system, and supported the creation of Cybertip.ca by Child Find Manitoba to report on online predators and child pornography. In addition, Mackintosh has overseen new initiatives in aboriginal and community justice, and has made efforts to target organized crime in Manitoba. On November 1, 2004, Mackintosh's department announced that it would introduce tough anti-gang legislation, which would permit the province to confiscate the assets of suspected gang members even if no criminal convictions have occurred.

In 2003, Mackintosh supported Bill Blaikie's candidacy to become leader of the federal New Democratic Party.[6]

The New Democrats were re-elected in 2003,[7] and Mackintosh was returned in St. Johns with over 72% of the vote.[4]

In September 2006, Mackintosh became Minister of Family Services and Housing, replacing Christine Melnick. Mackintosh assumed the portfolio during a period when the government was facing criticism over a perceived lack of accountability and proper financial controls over the funding of social service agencies. The controversy was sparked when an audit of the agency Hydra House by the provincial auditor found examples of widespread mismanagement and misapplication of public funds.

Mackintosh was re-elected in the 2007 provincial election.[8]

Trivia[edit]

In the 2007 television motion picture "Elijah", about the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, Mackintosh is portrayed by Matt Kippen.[9]

Electoral history[edit]

Manitoba provincial by-election, September 21, 1993: St. Johns
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
     New Democratic Party Gord Mackintosh 3,232 67.11
Liberal Naty Yankech 878 18.23
     Progressive Conservative June Robertson 465 9.66
     Progressive Neil Schipper 241 5.00
Total valid votes 4,816 100
Rejected and declined ballots 34
Turnout 4,850 44.48
Electors on the lists 10,903

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MLA Biographies - Living". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. November 4, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Batten, Donna; O'Handley, Kathryn, eds. (November 17, 2004). "Mackintosh, Hon. Gordon Henry Alexander, B.A., M.A., LL.B. (St. Johns)" (fee required). Canadian Parliamentary Guide (2005 ed.). Gale. ISBN 1-4144-0141-8. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Gord Mackintosh". Province of Manitoba. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "Manitoba Votes 2003 - Riding Profiles: St Johns". CBC News. 2003. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Manitoba Chooses NDP" (fee required). The Hamilton Spectator. Canadian Press. September 22, 1999. section C, p. 1. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Cross Canada Support for Bill". Bill Blaikie, Elmwood—Transcona. Archived from the original on April 1, 2007. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  7. ^ Edmonds, Scott (June 4, 2003). "Manitoba loves the NDP; Gary Doer's party wins stronger, second majority with increase in popular vote" (fee required). The Hamilton Spectator. section D, p. 3. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  8. ^ "16 cabinet ministers re-elected, one loses nailbiter". CBC News. May 22, 2007. Retrieved March 8, 2011. 
  9. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1001199/#Actor
Political offices
Preceded by
Himself
as Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Housing
Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Consumer Affairs
November 3, 2009 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Christine Melnick
Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Housing
September 21, 2006 – November 3, 2009
Succeeded by
Himself
as Manitoba Minister of Family Services and Consumer Affairs
Succeeded by
Kerri Irvin-Ross
as Manitoba Minister of Housing and Community Development
Preceded by
Vic Toews
Manitoba Minister of Justice and Attorney General
October 5, 1999 – September 21, 2006
Succeeded by
Dave Chomiak
Preceded by
Darren Praznik
Manitoba Government House Leader
October 5, 1999 – September 21, 2006
Succeeded by
Dave Chomiak
Legislative Assembly of Manitoba
Preceded by
Judy Wasylycia-Leis
Member of the Legislative Assembly for St. Johns
September 21, 1993 – present
Incumbent
Order of precedence
Preceded by
Rosann Wowchuk
as a member of the Executive Council of Manitoba
Order of precedence in Manitoba
as a member of the Executive Council of Manitoba
Succeeded by
Eric Robinson
as a member of the Executive Council of Manitoba