Gordon Edes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gordon Edes
Gordon edes.jpg
Born (1954-09-24) September 24, 1954 (age 59)
Education North Park University (did not graduate)

Gordon H. Edes (born September 24, 1954) is an American sportswriter and covers baseball for ESPN Boston.[1] He is best known for his long-time coverage of the Boston Red Sox baseball beat for the Boston Globe. He is a voter for the Baseball Hall of Fame.

He attended High School at Lunenburg High School in Lunenburg, Massachusetts, graduating in 1972.[2] He attended North Park University in Chicago from 1972-1975, but did not graduate.

Other media[edit]

While with the Globe, he was also a frequent guest on WBZ television's Sports Final program then hosted by Bob Lobel and a regular contributor to Soxcast, a Boston Globe podcast about the Red Sox.

Confrontation with Carl Everett[edit]

Edes is famous in Boston for his club house confrontation with former Red Sox outfielder Carl Everett. Everett, who had been the subject of several critical columns by Globe sportswriters, told Edes to get away from him and take his "curly-haired boyfriend" with him. He was referring to Dan Shaughnessy, another sportswriter with the Globe. The nickname, shortened to CHB, has stuck with Shaughnessy since, even being used by ESPN columnist Bill Simmons in his work.

Theo Epstein Wedding[edit]

In January 2007, Edes fell victim to a prank by Leslie Epstein, father of Red Sox Executive Vice President/General Manager Theo Epstein. In response to an email from Edes, Leslie Epstein confirmed that his son had secretly married Marie Whitney. In the email, however, Epstein stated the site of the wedding was Nathan's Famous hot dog stand at Coney Island.[3] Edes published this only to be later told by Epstein that he was joking about the location.

"Neither Theo or Marie has ever been to Coney Island as far as I know, or has ever tasted a Nathan’s Famous (though I have -- perfectly delicious), and Rabbi Schnitzlebaum slept undisturbed all day long. In short, not a word of it was meant to be taken seriously." [4]

It was later reported that the actual location of the wedding was Red Sox owner John Henry's yacht.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bill Ballou (2008-08-02). "Bay grew up idolizing Sox:Diamond Dust". Worcester Telegram & Gazette. Retrieved 2008-08-04. 
  2. ^ Edes, Gordon (2004-07-30). "Trade rumors, reunions, and Brian Daubach". Boston Globe. Retrieved 2007-05-04. 
  3. ^ Edes, Gordon (2007-01-31). "Hitch was in his plan". The Boston Globe. 
  4. ^ Edes, Gordon (2007-01-31). "A frank explanation". The Boston Globe. 
  5. ^ Error - BostonHerald.com

External links[edit]