Gordon Newell Mott

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Gordon Newell Mott
GordonNewellMott.jpg
Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives from Nevada Territory
In office
March 4, 1863 – October 31, 1864
Preceded by John Cradlebaugh
Succeeded by Henry G. Worthington (as U.S. Representative)
Personal details
Born (1812-10-21)October 21, 1812
Zanesville, Ohio
Died April 27, 1887(1887-04-27) (aged 74)
San Francisco, California
Political party Republican
Profession Attorney

Gordon Newell Mott (October 21, 1812 - April 27, 1887) was the second and final delegate to the United States House of Representatives from Nevada Territory, serving from March 1863 until statehood.

Biography[edit]

Born in Zanesville, Ohio, Mott completed preparatory studies and studied law. He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Zanesville in 1836. He moved to Texas during its struggle for independence and served nine months as a volunteer. He then returned to Ohio and resumed the practice of law. He later moved to California, in 1849, and served as judge of Sutter County in 1850 and district judge from 1851 to 1854. He moved to Nevada in 1861. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln associate justice of the supreme court of Nevada Territory on March 27, 1861, and served until his resignation in 1863, having been elected to Congress.

Mott was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-eighth Congress and served from March 4, 1863, to October 31, 1864, when the Nevada Territory became a state. He was not a candidate for elective office from the new state.

Mott died in San Francisco, California on April 27, 1887, and was interred in Laurel Hill Cemetery.

References[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Cradlebaugh
Delegate to the United States House of Representatives from Nevada Territory
1863–1864
Succeeded by
Henry G. Worthington
(U.S. Representative)

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.