Gordy Hoffman

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Gordon Richard "Gordy" Hoffman (born (1964-10-13) October 13, 1964 (age 50)) is an American writer and director.

Early life[edit]

Hoffman is the older brother of late American actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. His mother, Marilyn O'Connor (née Loucks), a native of Waterloo, New York, is a family court judge and lawyer. His father, Gordon Stowell Hoffman, is a former Xerox executive.[1][2] He has two sisters, Jill and Emily, in addition to his late brother Philip. His parents divorced in 1976.[3]

Film[edit]

In 2002, he wrote the screenplay for the film Love Liza, about a man dealing with his wife's suicide.[4] The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw described it as a "very melancholy evening in the cinema ... an intelligent and harrowing movie,"[5] while Ed Gonzalez from Slant Magazine disparagingly wrote: "Love Liza will have a difficult time distinguishing itself from Alexander Payne's About Schmidt, another widower-in-chaos comedy starring Bates in an undervalued role. Love Liza is nowhere near as condescending but its shrill pitch makes it just as difficult to take."[6]

Hoffman is the founder of the BlueCat Screenplay Competition – widely considered one of the best screenplay competitions for finding and fostering undiscovered writing talent. The winning screenplay from the 2005 competition, Balls Out: Gary the Tennis Coach was purchased by Greenestreet Films, and was released in 2009.

He taught graduate screenwriting at the USC School of Cinematic Arts.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Philip Seymour Hoffman Biography (1967–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved August 14, 2010. 
  2. ^ Shaw, David L. (March 7, 2006). "Oscar-Winner's Mother Was Born in Waterloo". Syracuse Post Standard. p. 78. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Yahoo". Movies.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  4. ^ Bruce Weber (February 2, 2014). "Philip Seymour Hoffman, Actor of Depth, Dies at 46". The New York Times. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ Peter Bradshaw (2014). "Love Liza". The Guardian. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  6. ^ Ed Gonzalez (November 22, 2002). "Love Liza". Slant Magazine. Slant Magazine. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Screenwriting Workshop with Gordy Hoffman | Dryden Theatre". Dryden.eastmanhouse.org. August 1, 2007. Retrieved 2014-02-03. 

External links[edit]