Gosankyō

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The Gosankyō (御三卿?) were three branches of the Tokugawa clan of Japan.[1] They were descended from the eighth of the fifteen Tokugawa shoguns, Yoshimune (1684–1751). Yoshimune established the Gosankyo to augment (or perhaps to replace) the Gosanke, the heads of the powerful han (fiefs) of Owari, Kishū, and Mito. Two of his sons, together with the second son of his successor Ieshige, established the Tayasu, Hitotsubashi, and Shimizu branches of the Tokugawa.[2] Unlike the Gosanke, they did not rule a han. Still, they remained prominent until the end of Tokugawa rule, and some later shoguns were chosen from the Hitotsubashi line.

Heads of Gosankyo[edit]

Tayasu House 田安家[edit]

  1. Munetake (1716–1771, r. 1731–1771)
  2. Haruaki (1753–1774, r. 1771–1774)
  3. Narimasa (1779–1846, r. 1787–1836)
  4. Naritaka (1810–1845, r. 1836–1839)
  5. Yoshiyori (1828–1876, r. 1839–1863)
  6. Takachiyo (1860–1865, r. 1863–1865)
  7. Kamenosuke (1863–1940, r. 1865–1868)
  8. Yoshiyori (2nd time) (1828–1876, r. 1868–1876)
  9. Satotaka (1865-1941, r. 1876-1941)
  10. Satonari (1899-1961, r. 1941-61)
  11. Munefusa (1929- , r.1961- )[3]

Shimizu House 清水家[edit]

  1. Shigeyoshi (1745–1795, r. 1758–1795)
  2. Atsunosuke (1796–1799, r. 1798–1799)
  3. Nariyuki (1801–1846, r. 1805–1816)
  4. Narinori (1810–1827, r. 1816–1827)
  5. Narikatsu (1820–1849, r. 1827–1846)
  6. Akitake (1853–1910, r. 1866–1868)
  7. Atsumori (1856–1924, r. 1870–1924)

Hitotsubashi House 一橋家[edit]

  1. Munetada (1721–1765, r. 1735–1764)
  2. Harusada (1751–1827, r. 1764–1799)
  3. Nariatsu (1780–1816, r. 1799–1816)
  4. Narinori (1803–1830, r. 1816–1830)
  5. Narikura (1818–1837, r. 1830–1837)
  6. Yoshimasa (1825–1838, r. 1837–1838)
  7. Yoshinaga (1823–1847, r. 1838–1847)
  8. Shōmaru (1846–1847, r. 1847)
  9. Yoshinobu (1837–1913, r. 1847–1866)
  10. Mochiharu (1831–1884, r. 1866–1884)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ United States. Embassy (Japan). Translation Services Branch. (1987). Summaries of Selected Japanese Magazines, Issues 2-12, p. 10.
  2. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Gosan-kyō" in Japan encyclopedia, p. 259; n.b., Louis-Frédéric is pseudonym of Louis-Frédéric Nussbaum, see Deutsche Nationalbibliothek Authority File.
  3. ^ Library of Congress authority file, Tokugawa Munefusa nr2007-10575

References[edit]