Government of the 26th Dáil

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The 26th Dáil of Ireland was elected at the 1989 general election on 15 June 1989 and first met on 12 July when the 21st Government of Ireland was appointed. The 26th Dáil lasted 1,259 days.

21st Government of Ireland[edit]

Government of the 26th Dáil
21st Government of Ireland
Date formed 12 July 1989
Date dissolved 11 February 1992
People and organizations
Head of government Charles Haughey
Deputy head of government Brian Lenihan, Snr (1989–90)
John Wilson (1990–92)
Head of state Patrick Hillery (1989–90)
Mary Robinson (1990–92)
Total number of ministers 15
Member parties Fianna Fáil
Progressive Democrats
Status in legislature Coalition
Opposition leader Alan Dukes (1989–90) (FG)
John Bruton (1990–92) (FG)
History
Election(s) 1989 general election
Legislature term(s) 26th Dáil
Previous 20th Government of Ireland
Successor 22nd Government of Ireland

The 21st Government of Ireland (12 July 1989 – 11 February 1992) was formed by the Fianna Fáil and Progressive Democrats parties.[1] After the 1989 general election Fianna Fáil lost four seats, and Charles Haughey failed to achieve a majority when a vote for Taoiseach was taken in the Dáil. 27 days after the election had taken place the coalition government was formed. From January to June 1990 Ireland held the presidency of the European Community. The 1990 Presidential election was held on 7 November. Mary Robinson won the election, beating the Fianna Fáil candidate Brian Lenihan.

On 6 November 1991, Seán Power made a motion of no confidence in the Taoiseach, which failed.[2]

In early 1992 Seán Doherty, who as Minister for Justice had taken the blame for the phone-tapping scandal of the early 1980s, went on RTÉ and claimed that Haughey had known and authorised it. Haughey denied this but the Progressive Democrats stated that they could no longer continue in government with Haughey as Taoiseach.[3]

On 30 January 1992, Haughey resigned as leader of Fianna Fáil. He was succeeded by Albert Reynolds who formed the 22nd Government of Ireland.

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Charles Haughey 1989–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for the Gaeltacht
Tánaiste Brian Lenihan[4] 1989–90 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Defence
Minister for Agriculture and Food Michael O'Kennedy 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Communications[5] Ray Burke 1989–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Justice
Minister for Education Mary O'Rourke 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Energy Bobby Molloy 1989–92 Progressive Democrats
Minister for the Environment Pádraig Flynn[6] 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Finance Albert Reynolds[6] 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Foreign Affairs Gerry Collins 1989–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Health Rory O'Hanlon 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Industry and Commerce Desmond O'Malley 1989–92 Progressive Democrats
Minister for Labour Bertie Ahern 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for the Marine John Wilson 1989–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Social Welfare Michael Woods 1989–91 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Tourism and Transport[5] Séamus Brennan 1989–92 Fianna Fáil

Changes 1 November 1990[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Tánaiste John Wilson[4] 1990–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Defence Charles Haughey[4] (acting) Fianna Fáil

Changes 5 February 1991[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Minister for Defence Brendan Daly 1991 Fianna Fáil

Changes 8 November 1991[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Minister for the Environment John Wilson[6] (acting) Fianna Fáil
Minister for Finance Charles Haughey[6] (acting) Fianna Fáil

Changes 14 November 1991[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Minister for Agriculture and Food Michael Woods 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Defence Vincent Brady 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Education Noel Davern 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for the Environment Rory O'Hanlon 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Finance Bertie Ahern 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Health Mary O'Rourke 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Labour Michael O'Kennedy 1991–92 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Social Welfare Brendan Daly 1991–92 Fianna Fáil

Presidential election[edit]

After a challenge by John Wilson in September 1990 Fianna Fáil chose Lenihan as the party's candidate. The main opposition party, Fine Gael chose Austin Currie and the Labour Party chose the eventual winner Mary Robinson.

Acts of the Oireachtas passed[edit]

1989[edit]

  • No. 18/1989 – Children Act, 1989
  • No. 19/1989 – Prohibition of Incitement To Hatred Act, 1989
  • No. 20/1989 – Údarás na Gaeltachta (Amendment) Act, 1989
  • No. 21/1989 – Trustee Savings Banks Act, 1989
  • No. 22/1989 – Video Recordings Act, 1989
  • No. 23/1989 – Appropriation Act, 1989

Private Acts

  • No. 1/1989 – Local Government Provisional Order Confirmation Act, 1989

1990[edit]

  • No. 1/1990 – Bord Glas Act, 1990
  • No. 2/1990 – Decimal Currency Act, 1990
  • No. 3/1990 – Building Control Act, 1990
  • No. 4/1990 – B & I Line Act, 1990
  • No. 5/1990 – Social Welfare Act, 1990
  • No. 6/1990 – Defence (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 7/1990 – Dún Laoghaire Harbour Act, 1990
  • No. 8/1990 – Horse Breeding Act, 1990
  • No. 9/1990 – Larceny Act, 1990
  • No. 10/1990 – Finance Act, 1990
  • No. 11/1990 – Local Government (Planning and Development) Act, 1990
  • No. 12/1990 – Firearms and Offensive Weapons Act, 1990
  • No. 13/1990 – International Carriage of Goods by Road Act, 1990
  • No. 14/1990 – Derelict Sites Act, 1990
  • No. 15/1990 – Industrial Credit (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 16/1990 – Criminal Justice Act, 1990
  • No. 17/1990 – Control of Clinical Trials and Drugs Act, 1990
  • No. 18/1990 – National Treasury Management Agency Act, 1990
  • No. 19/1990 – Industrial Relations Act, 1990
  • No. 20/1990 – Shannon Navigation Act, 1990
  • No. 21/1990 – Local Government (Water Pollution) (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 22/1990 – Turf Development Act, 1990
  • No. 23/1990 – Health (Nursing Homes) Act, 1990
  • No. 24/1990 – Broadcasting Act, 1990
  • No. 25/1990 – Pensions Act, 1990
  • No. 26/1990 – Insurance Act, 1990
  • No. 27/1990 – Companies (Amendment) Act, 1990 – created the Examinership process
  • No. 28/1990 – Teachers' Superannuation (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 29/1990 – International Development Association (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 30/1990 – Public Hospitals (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 31/1990 – Fóir Teoranta (Dissolution) Act, 1990
  • No. 32/1990 – Criminal Law (Rape) (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 33/1990 – Companies Act, 1990
  • No. 34/1990 – Criminal Justice (Forensic Evidence) Act, 1990
  • No. 35/1990 – Exchange Control (Continuance) Act, 1990
  • No. 36/1990 – Electoral (Amendment) Act, 1990
  • No. 37/1990 – Unit Trusts Act, 1990
  • No. 38/1990 – Appropriation Act, 1990

1991[edit]

  • No. 1/1991 – European Bank For Reconstruction and Development Act, 1991
  • No. 2/1991 – Marine Institute Act, 1991
  • No. 3/1991 – Sugar Act, 1991
  • No. 4/1991 – Destructive Insects and Pests (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 5/1991 – Worker Protection (Regular Part-Time Employees) Act, 1991
  • No. 6/1991 – Child Abduction and Enforcement of Custody Orders Act, 1991
  • No. 7/1991 – Social Welfare Act, 1991
  • No. 8/1991 – Contractual Obligations (Applicable Law) Act, 1991
  • No. 9/1991 – Radiological Protection Act, 1991
  • No. 10/1991 – Presidential Establishment (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 11/1991 – Local Government Act, 1991
  • No. 12/1991 – Educational Exchange (Ireland and the United States of America) Act, 1991
  • No. 13/1991 – Finance Act, 1991
  • No. 14/1991 – Adoption Act, 1991
  • No. 15/1991 – Health (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 16/1991 – University of Limerick (Dissolution of Thomond College) Act, 1991
  • No. 17/1991 – Child Care Act, 1991
  • No. 18/1991 – Statute of Limitations (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 19/1991 – Temple Bar Area Renewal and Development Act, 1991
  • No. 20/1991 – Courts Act, 1991
  • No. 21/1991 – Courts (No. 2) Act, 1991
  • No. 22/1991 – Trade and Marketing Promotion Act, 1991
  • No. 23/1991 – Courts (Supplemental Provisions) (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 24/1991 – Competition Act, 1991
  • No. 25/1991 – Payment of Wages Act, 1991
  • No. 26/1991 – Fisheries (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 27/1991 – Sea Pollution Act, 1991
  • No. 28/1991 – Liability For Defective Products Act, 1991
  • No. 29/1991 – B & I Line Act, 1991
  • No. 30/1991 – Industrial Development (Amendment) Act, 1991
  • No. 31/1991 – Criminal Damage Act, 1991
  • No. 32/1991 – Appropriation Act, 1991

22nd Government of Ireland[edit]

Government of the 26th Dáil
22nd Government of Ireland
Date formed 11 February 1992
Date dissolved 12 January 1993
People and organizations
Head of government Albert Reynolds
Deputy head of government John Wilson
Head of state Mary Robinson
Total number of ministers 15
Member parties Fianna Fáil
Progressive Democrats
Status in legislature Coalition
Opposition leader John Bruton (Fine Gael)
History
Legislature term(s) 26th Dáil
Previous 21st Government of Ireland
Successor 23rd Government of Ireland

The 22nd Government of Ireland (11 February 1992 – 12 January 1993) was formed by the Fianna Fáil and Progressive Democrats parties with Albert Reynolds as Taoiseach following the resignation of Charles Haughey.[1] Reynolds formed a controversial cabinet. He dismissed Ray Burke, Mary O'Rourke and Gerry Collins. Renolds promoted critics of Haughey like David Andrews, Séamus Brennan, and Charlie McCreevy into senior ministerial positions. Reynolds also promoted a number of younger TDs from rural constituencies like Noel Dempsey and Brian Cowen, to cabinet position. Bertie Ahern remained as Minister for Finance.

The 22nd Government had to deal with the X Case. The government took the position that abortion should be illegal except when the life of the mother was in danger. A referendum on abortion was held with the government position being defeated

A tribunal of enquiry into irregularities in the beef industry, referred to as the "Beef Tribunal", was established to examine the relationship between the Irish governments and the beef industry. However this revealed to the public a substantial conflict of opinion between the two party leaders. At the tribunal Desmond O'Malley severely criticised Reynolds, in his capacity as Minister for Industry and Commerce, for an export credit scheme. When Reynolds gave evidence he referred to O'Malley as "dishonest", the Progressive Democrats voted with a motion of no confidence and the government fell.

After the 1992 general election, the 23rd Government of Ireland was formed by a coalition between Fianna Fáil and the Labour Party.

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Albert Reynolds 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Tánaiste John Wilson 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Defence
Minister for the Gaeltacht
Minister for Agriculture and Food Joe Walsh 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Education Séamus Brennan 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Energy Bobby Molloy[7] 1992 Progressive Democrats
Minister for the Environment Michael Smith 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Finance Bertie Ahern 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Foreign Affairs David Andrews 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Health John O'Connell 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Industry and Commerce Desmond O'Malley[7] 1992 Progressive Democrats
Minister for Justice Pádraig Flynn 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Labour Brian Cowen 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for the Marine Michael Woods 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Social Welfare Charlie McCreevy 1992–93 Fianna Fáil
Minister for Tourism, Transport and Communications[5] Máire Geoghegan-Quinn 1992–93 Fianna Fáil

Changes 4 November 1992[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Minister for Energy Albert Reynolds[7] (acting) Fianna Fáil
Minister for Industry and Commerce Pádraig Flynn[7] 1992–93 Fianna Fáil

Changes 4 January 1993[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Minister for Industry and Commerce Bertie Ahern 1993 Fianna Fáil

Acts of the Oireachtas passed[edit]

1992[edit]

  • No. 1/1992 – Patents Act, 1992
  • No. 2/1992 – Merchant Shipping Act, 1992
  • No. 3/1992 – Oireachtas (Allowances To Members) and Ministerial and Parliamentary Offices (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 4/1992 – Land Bond Act, 1992
  • No. 5/1992 – Social Welfare Act, 1992
  • No. 6/1992 – Acc Bank Act, 1992
  • No. 7/1992 – Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1992
  • No. 8/1992 – Referendum (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 9/1992 – Finance Act, 1992
  • No. 10/1992 – Fishery Harbour Centres (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 11/1992 – Financial Transactions of Certain Companies and Other Bodies Act, 1992
  • No. 12/1992 – Criminal Evidence Act, 1992
  • No. 13/1992 – Control of Dogs (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 14/1992 – Local Government (Planning and Development) Act, 1992
  • No. 15/1992 – Dublin Institute of Technology Act, 1992
  • No. 16/1992 – Regional Technical Colleges Act, 1992
  • No. 17/1992 – Foreshore (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 18/1992 – Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act, 1992
  • No. 19/1992 – Local Authorities (Higher Education Grants) Act, 1992
  • No. 20/1992 – Health (Family Planning) (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 21/1992 – ICC Bank Act, 1992
  • No. 22/1992 – Referendum (Amendment) (No. 2) Act, 1992
  • No. 23/1992 – Electoral Act, 1992
  • No. 24/1992 – European Communities (Amendment) Act, 1992
  • No. 25/1992 – Irish Land Commission (Dissolution) Act, 1992
  • No. 26/1992 – Appropriation Act, 1992
  • No. 27/1992 – Financial Transfers Act, 1992
  • No. 28/1992 – Finance (No. 2) Act, 1992
  • No. 29/1992 – Censorship of Films (Amendment) Act, 1992

Private Acts

  • No. 1/1992 – Limerick Markets Act, 1992

Constitutional Amendments

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History of Government – Twenty-Sixth Dáil". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 20 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "The motion failed". The Irish Emigrant. 11 November 1991. 
  3. ^ "Ireland's Haughey will resign to avert fall of coalition over wiretapping charges". The Baltimore Sun. 31 January 1992. 
  4. ^ a b c Brian Lenihan was sacked from the cabinet on 31 October during the 1990 Presidential election.
  5. ^ a b c On 7 February 1991, the functions of the Minister for Communications were passed to the retitled Minister for Tourism, Transport and Communications and the Department of Communications ceased to exist.
  6. ^ a b c d Albert Reynolds and Pádraig Flynn were both sacked in November 1991 after Reynolds challenged Charles Haughey for the leadership of Fianna Fáil.
  7. ^ a b c d On 4 November 1992 Desmond O'Malley resigned as Minister for Industry and Commerce and Bobby Molloy resigned as Minister for Energy after the Progressive Democrats left the government.